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Prep Sports Roundup: 4/7

first_img Written by April 7, 2021 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 4/7 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBaseballNon-RegionPRICE, Utah-Creed Mogle posted the sole RBI of the game and the Gunnison Valley Bulldogs blanked Carbon 1-0 Wednesday in non-region baseball play. Janzen Keisel went the distance on the mound for Gunnison Valley, amassing 18 strikeouts and surrendering only one hit in seven innings of work. The Bulldogs improved to 10-1 on the season.MANTI, Utah-Karson Hunt posted a key 2-RBI double in the top of the 7th Inning and the South Sevier Rams came back to edge the Manti Templars 10-9 in non-region baseball play Wednesday. Jarin Robb and Tait Brown also posted 2 RBI apiece for the Rams, who improved to 5-5 with the win. Ridge Tebbs, Tyson Robb, Payson Mitchell and Emilio Miramontes also drove in runs for South Sevier in the win. Tebbs was attributed with the victory on the mound for the Rams. Jason Nelson and Kade Cherry each had 2 RBI apiece in the loss for the Templars. Braxton Henningson and A.J. Cox also drove in runs for Manti in defeat.SoftballNon-RegionPAROWAN, Utah-Bryn Rasmussen posted a pair of RBI and the Millard Eagles downed Parowan 3-1 in non-region softball action Wednesday. Hailey Flynn earned the win in the circle for Millard. Laci Sissener homered in the loss for the Rams.RICHFIELD, Utah-Kailey Stanworth hit two doubles and drove in four runs to lead Delta past Richfield 14-3 in non-region softball action Wednesday. Alex Taylor also hit a pair of doubles and had 3 RBI’s, while Lexie Curtis earned the win in the circle for the Rabbits. Whitlee Christensen doubled and drove in all three runs for the Wildcats.Boys SoccerRegion 14ROOSEVELT, Utah-Brady Jacobsen scored twice and the North Sanpete Hawks edged Union 2-1 Wednesday in Region 14 boys soccer action. Ian Stengel scored for the Cougars in defeat.MANTI, Utah-Trace Boggess posted a pair of goals and the Manti Templars humbled Delta 2-1 in Region 14 boys soccer action Wednesday. Juan Palmerin added an assist for Manti. Braiden Gonder scored in the loss for the Rabbits.center_img Brad Jameslast_img read more

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GOLUB, MARGRET (nee: Levy)

first_imgpassed away on July 8, 2017. Born in Brooklyn, she was a Bayonne resident for over 30 years. She was a secretary for the Interstate Environmental Commission. Margret was predeceased by her husband, Howard Golub. She is survived by her daughter, Alana Golub. Funeral arrangements by BAYONNE MEMORIAL HOME, 854 Avenue C.last_img

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Ocean City Police Activity Report for Oct. 19 to 25

first_imgOctober 21, 2014: TuesdayCalls for service: 78Motor Vehicle Stops: 26Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 24Alarms: 6The Police Department assisted with 2 fire and 2 EMS callsFraud, 1800 block Central Ave., at 4:50pmVerbal, 900 block Wesley Ave., at 8:48pm PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS:Just a reminder that it is a violation of a City Ordinance to have dogs on the boardwalk anytime during the year.City Ordinance 87-17sec.4-32 prohibits any Boat/Trailer over 22 feet in overall length from being parked on a city street.       Any boat/trailer less than 22 feet in overall length can only remain on a city street for three consecutive days. Officers will be issuing summons and towing boats/trailers for any observed violations.This week in Halloween so please be careful when driving on Friday night for young children out trick-or-treating. Ocean City Police Department October 24, 2014: FridayCalls for service: 83Motor Vehicle Stops: 37Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 14Alarms: 1The Police Department assisted with 4 fire and 3 EMS callsDisorderly conduct, 100 block Bay Ave., at 2:17amBurglary, 100 block Asbury Ave., at 7:16amWarrant, 400 block West Ave., one in custody, at 10:47amWarrant, 3400 block West Ave., one in custody, at 11:40amFraud, 400 block Atlantic Ave., at 1:12pmWarrant, 9th Street, one in custody, at 5:19pmThreats, Plymouth Pl., at 6:23pm October 19, 2014: Sunday                                                Calls for service: 82Motor Vehicle Stops: 17Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 21Alarms: 4The Police Department assisted with 6 Fire and 11 EMS callsWarrant, 2900 block Bay Ave., one in custody, at 1:15pmCriminal mischief, 2900 block Bay Ave., at 2:41pm October 23, 2014: ThursdayCalls for service: 60Motor Vehicle Stops: 22Motor Vehicle Accidents: 1Property Checks: 23Alarms: 1The Police Department assisted with 1 fire and 2 EMS callsMotor vehicle accident, 1200 block West Ave., at 8:54amBurglary, 100 block Asbury Ave., at 9:59am OCEAN CITY POLICE SUMMARIZED WEEK’S ACTIVITIES October 19 – 25, 2014Calls for Service: 528Daily Average: 75 October 22, 2014: WednesdayCalls for service: 51Motor Vehicle Stops: 13Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 22Alarms: 0The Police Department assisted with 3 fire and 4 EMS callsBurglary, 1600 block West Ave., at 10:24am October 25, 2014: Saturday Calls for service: 91Motor Vehicle Stops: 45Motor Vehicle Accidents: 1Property Checks: 15Alarms: 1The Police Department assisted with 2 fire and 3 EMS callsWarrant, Wesley Ave., one in custody, at 7:57amTrespassing, 4600 block West Ave., at 1:13pmThreats, Plymouth Pl., at 1:24pmMotor vehicle accident, Coolidge Rd., at 4:35pmWarrant, Route 52, one in custody, at 5:11pmTheft, 800 block Plymouth Pl., at 5:32pmFight, 500 block Atlantic Ave., at 5:40pm October 20, 2014: Monday Calls for service: 83Motor Vehicle Stops: 32Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 24Alarms: 6The Police Department assisted with 6 Fire and 4 EMS callsWarrant, 7th Street, one in custody, at 10:00amlast_img read more

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Faculty weighs in on proposed core curriculum changes

first_imgThe Core Curriculum Review Committee released its final report Aug. 31, after taking feedback on a draft report released last November. The proposed changes would reduce the number of required math and science courses and modify the requirements related to the arts, humanities and social sciences. According to the report, if the changes are accepted, they will be the most significant changes to the core curriculum in more than 40 years.Lindsey Meyers In order to take effect, the Academic Council and University President Fr. John Jenkins will have to approve the proposal.“The old requirement was two math, two science and now it’s one of each plus one more of either — so it indicates a bit of a decrease,” mathematics department chair Jeffrey Diller said. “No one likes to see their own area deemphasized. That said, there seems to be a ton of interest in math courses, requirements aside, these days. I don’t think we’re very worried about loss of enrollment or something in freshman course offerings. “Lots of people take calculus; I think econ, in particular, has been stressing taking calculus classes even more. The practical effect of it is, in truth, probably not that large for us.” Diller said he felt “neutral” toward the possible decrease in math classes and that his “concerns will be elsewhere,” specifically with students not being able to use AP credit to fill requirements.“So if you got a five on the Calculus BC exam that doesn’t automatically get you out of the University math requirement — you still need to take a math course, but it could be something down the road from calc I or II,” he said. “We’ll be very concerned that the advising matches that change. It’s a shame if people who took calc I and II in high school take it again because that’s just the simplest thing to do under the circumstances. We’ll be concerned to find courses where people actually see something new.”The report indicates that students would be required to take one class each in “quantitative reasoning” and “science and technology” and one additional course in either. Diller said the change in name could indicate an expansion in who can teach classes related to math. “In truth, even under the old system, it was possible for another department to propose a course that would fulfill the math requirement, but there never were any proposals,” he said. “Maybe that will change now for reasons that I can’t see. Even with the change in name, there was this opportunity before to have courses offered by people other than us.”The report also recommends requiring students to take a foundational philosophy course, but allowing a student to take a second course in philosophy or one in “Catholicism and the Disciplines” (CAD), a new category of courses that cover Catholic topics, but can be in any field.“When taught well, philosophy courses don’t just give students a body of information,” philosophy department chair Jeff Speaks said in an email. “They also teach students to form and defend their own views about the right answers to fundamental questions about the universe and themselves. “According to the recommendation, CAD courses must have this normative dimension as well. If they really do, then I think that the proposed changes will open up some interesting opportunities for Notre Dame students. If they don’t, then we will have taken a step in the wrong direction.”Diller said the proposed changes essentially come down to how much the University requires students to step out of their specific field of study.“Is it a good idea to make students take courses outside of their area of interest, or should we be like Brown [University], for instance, where there are basically no general requirements and people just take exactly what they want to take?” he said. “That’s somewhat above my paygrade, but I am sort of in favor in pushing people to try stuff outside of their specific area.”In addition to advising students to take appropriate math classes, Diller said he also has concerns about flexibility in course schedules.“This does make things somewhat more flexible for a lot of students, but not for science or engineering students,” he said. “It would be nice to see more flexibility for them. … I don’t see that the core curriculum has touched on this at all.”Tags: academics, Core Curriculum, core curriculum review committee, University Requirementslast_img read more

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Water wise plants

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of Georgia Georgia’s drought can be instructive when you’re picking plants for your landscape. If a plant is looking good now, it’s a winner.”There are some plants you just cannot kill, no matter how hard you try,” said University of Georgia horticulturist David Berle.”I dug up some day lilies, hostas and liriope from a bed one time and set them on the driveway to await the construction of a wall,” he said. “The stone for the wall took four weeks to arrive. And all that time, the plants set on the driveway with almost no water at all. They looked a little droopy, but we didn’t loose a single plant.”Plants with bulbs, corms or otherwise bulbous roots are amazingly tough and survive anything, he said.In his home landscape, Berle has seen that with no watering, these plants are looking good: Hydrangea macrophylla, Spirea japonica, Camellia sasanqua, Lagerstroemia x ‘Natchez,’ Iris ensata, Verbena bonariensis, Coreopsis ‘Moonbeam,’ Loropetalum chinensis and Vitex agnus-castus.He notes that they were well established before the drought. “Plants that have taken it pretty hard in my yard,” he said, “are Hydrangea quercifolia, pittosporums, Fothergilla ‘ Mt. Airy,’ Itea virginica, gardenia and, of course, the dogwoods.”All across north Georgia, homeowners report losing dogwoods. “I lost several older dogwoods this year,” Berle said. “They were already looking poorly over the past several years. But this year finished them off.”Signs of damaged dogwoods include dead limbs and decay. “I think this summer was just too much,” he said. “I like dogwoods, though, and fully intend to replant.””Start with some very small trees, 3- to 5-gallon size,” he said, “and plant as soon as they go dormant. There will be no transpiration and thus little drought stress on them. Smaller trees tend to adapt more quickly and require less water during their early years than larger specimen trees.”Some traditional rules for landscape care don’t apply this year. “Cut back all perennials now,” Berle said. “Normally I wait until just about the end of winter. But for those plants suffering already, I think cutting them back will at least hold the line on stress.”At this point, he said, plants can’t benefit much from being left intact. “Normally, I’d say leave the green as long as possible to let the plant send energy from photosynthesis to the roots,” he said. “But my guess is that little photosynthesis is going on, and plants are drying out and dying. I cut back lots of perennials as soon as it looked like water was going to be cut off. They look tidier, too.”Tim Smalley, a UGA horticulturist, usually saves transplanting for between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. “I always felt that it gave the plants time to better establish some roots before spring,” he said.Stepping up winter chores isn’t keeping him from planning to plant. “I still plan to plant some things this fall,” he said. “I’m using collected water, collecting water from the start of my shower to water these plants. I’ll water only until they lose their leaves in late fall, or until about Nov. 15 to first frost.”Water shortages have forced Georgians to think more seriously about conservation measures. Smalley says we should always think about conservation.”Many homeowners water their lawns more than once per week,” Smalley said. “A lawn or annual bed looks better with more frequent irrigation, but I don’t think that we have the water resources to sustain that use level. I water my plants for only one year after planting. And except for hydrangeas, I have had good success. I never water my lawn or established landscape.”last_img read more

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CUNA political ads, 100MM website take home awards

first_imgThere are a few new awards in CUNA’s trophy case, thanks to creative print and digital ads, as well as CUNA’s 100 million memberships website.CUNA won two awards from the American Association of Political Consultants, known as the “Pollies,” which recognize excellence in political communications.Both awards were from the 2014 election. The first, which took home the silver “Best Use of Membership Political Mail–Democrat,” was a campaign for Mark Udall, the former Colorado senator. The ad, done in conjunction with the Mountain West Credit Union Association (MWCUA), portrays Udall as a superhero fighting for credit union members.”He may not wear a cape, but Mark Udall is a hero when it comes to fighting for Credit Union members,” reads the ad, which was sent to MWCUA credit union members. continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Congress returns this week: Flood insurance, government funding on agenda

first_imgCongress is back in full swing this week, and NAFCU Vice President of Legislative Affairs Brad Thaler details lawmakers’ to-do list in a new NAFCU Today video, including the need to address fiscal 2018 government funding, reauthorize the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and raise the debt ceiling, all by month’s end.Thaler also mentions possible action soon by the Senate on a House-passed Congressional Review Act resolution to withdraw the CFPB’s recent arbitration rulemaking. In the coming weeks and months, Thaler says, Congress and the administration will also continue work on tax reform, regulatory relief, housing finance reform and data security.“All these issues and more will be addressed during next week’s Congressional Caucus,” says Thaler.Congress this week will also be holding hearings addressing economic growth and the financial regulatory regime. Hearings include: 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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4 best bets for stocking up on Halloween candy this year

first_imgHalloween is almost here. No matter how old you are, it brings out the kid in all of us. The best thing about Halloween? Some might say dressing up, but I’d say it’s the candy.While most of us probably try to avoid candy most of the time, Halloween is the one time during the year that we can stop worrying about it and stuff our faces with enough sugar to hold us over until next October.While candy is delicious, it can also be expensive. If you need to stock up on enough of the good stuff to keep the kids in your neighborhood satisfied (and have a little extra for yourself) you should take advantage of these Amazon deals right now.Here are 4 of my favorites you can’t go wrong with…Huge Assorted Party Mix Box – 6.25 lbs, $35.99 – This giant box of candy is a great mix of all the best Halloween candies. This might be all you need to be the favorite house in the neighborhood. That is unless somebody is giving out full-sized Snickers, in which case I can’t help you.AirHeads – 90 count, $9.37 – AirHeads are basically just sugar sticks with a hint of flavor, but they’re chewy and delicious, so what else do you need?M&M’s Variety Mix – 150 pieces, $22.99 – You can’t go wrong with M&M’s. If you like chocolate, you like M&M’s. Except maybe Peanut M&M’s. I mean they’re good, they’re just not quite as good as Peanut Butter M&M’s. Tell me I’m wrong.Mini Chocolate Candy Variety Mix – 240 pieces, $14.50 – Candy bars are awesome. A 4-pound bag of mini candy bars is super awesome. Twix, Snickers, 3 Musketeers, Milky Way . . . what’s not to love? Hop on this deal while it’s available and enjoy seeing some wide-eyed Avengers on your front porch this Halloween. 33SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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New $40M Nassau Police Academy Plan Linked to Cover-up Scandal

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County officials announced Wednesday plans to build a new $40 million police academy at Nassau Community College four years after affiliates of the nonprofit group helping fund its construction were linked to a burglary cover-up.The Center for Training and Intelligence, as the planned facility is called, would replace the current academy in the retrofitted, half-century-old Hawthorne Elementary School in Massapequa Park that the department rents for $700,000 annually. Officials said they’ll pay for the project with a combination of $10 million in taxpayer funding, $25 million in asset forfeiture funds—money seized from suspects during investigations—and $5 million donated by the nonprofit Nassau County Police Department Foundation. Three ex-Nassau police commanders were convicted of quashing burglary charges for the son of a donor to that nonprofit, including one ex-cop who appealed.“Instead of putting capital improvements in a leased space that would be very hard to retrofit, to take advantage of today’s technologies, we’re moving ahead,” Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano told reporters during a press conference while flanked by legislators, police brass and members of the nonprofit.The 120,000-square foot facility planned for East Garden City would be the first of its kind for the department’s 80-year history and is slated to debut in two years. It would train new recruits as well as current members in addition to housing the department’s intelligence unit and contain mock “tactical villages,” where police can conduct simulated drug raids and hostage situations. It would be a big step up from the academy as it stands now, police said.“Our current facility, as built and designed, was a grammar school, not a police academy,” said Acting Nassau Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter, who noted that the building is ill-equipped for its current function. “There are significant differences.”Asked if Nassau—which County Comptroller George Maragos projected is facing a $52-million deficit next year—can afford to spend millions on the new venture, Mangano said the academy was worth the investment.“You really can’t measure it from the dollars of the building,” Mangano said. “It’s what goes on in that building, that’s our investment—that training, that national exposure, that intelligence-led policing model.“We are very, very mindful of the deficiencies here in our county,” he added. “We strive for efficiency…we do not sacrifice quality of life…we do not sacrifice the investment in our police department.”Nassau Police Benevolent Association President James Carver told the Press he’s “in favor of a more modernized facility that will assist in training our police officers, both the recruits that are coming on the job, and providing training for active members.” But, he’d also like to see the county update some of its antiquated precincts, and hire additional officers, given recent retirements, he said. “Building a police academy without hiring makes no sense,” he said.The county needs to cut through plenty of red tape before shovel hits dirt, which could happen as early as this fall, officials said. The county submitted a Request for Proposal seeking contractors to build the facility earlier this month with a deadline of Feb. 18. And federal authorities must provide written approval for the county to use asset forfeiture dollars on the project.A rendering of the planned Nassau Police Academy’s “tactical village,” where officers can simulate mock drug raids or hostage situations.“We are very confident that we’ll receive that approval,” Krumpter said, adding that the department could get the go ahead in the next couple of months.The NCPD Foundation was founded in 2008 by former Nassau police commissioner Lawrence Mulvey specifically to raise money to build the new police academy. In statements made at a June 2010 Long Island Real Estate Group event, Mulvey told attendees that the nonprofit hoped to raise $25 million in two years to build a future police academy, then estimated to cost $48 million for a 75,000-square foot facility, according to the New York Real Estate Journal. The foundation ultimately raised one fifth of that goal.Eric Blumencranz, chairman of the NCPD Foundation, said Mulvey, who retired in 2011, “deserves substantial credit” for his contribution in having the foundation’s dream of a new academy realized. As for the donation, Blumencranz said: “I don’t think we ever committed to $25 million in fundraising, but we committed to raising significant amount of funds.” The $25 million figure likely included a combination of fundraising and asset forfeiture dollars, he said.“The fundraising for this project isn’t over, it’s still in the beginning stages,” Blumencranz explained, adding that he has commitments from several donors who first wanted to see shovels on the ground. Additional donations could come from naming certain academy buildings after donors, he said.The foundation came under scrutiny in 2012 when three Nassau police commanders were charged with quashing the investigation of a 2009 burglary committed by then-police-intern Zachary Parker, of Merrick, who’s father, Gary, donated to and volunteered for the nonprofit.Former Second Deputy Nassau Police Commissioner William Flanagan, convicted of conspiring to cover up a burglary, faced a press swarm after his arrest in March 2012. (Photo by Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)The charges stemmed from a Press expose into the foundation and the covered-up burglary. All three commanders left the department following their arrest and the burglar was convicted after prosecutors picked up the case. Then-Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice cleared the police foundation of wrongdoing, although Gary Parker was named in court as an un-indicted co-conspirator. He resigned from the group.In February 2013, a jury convicted William Flanagan, an ex-deputy Nassau County police commissioner, of conspiracy and official misconduct, but he was acquitted of receiving reward for official misconduct. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail, but execution of that sentence was stayed pending the outcome of his appeal.John Hunter, the former deputy chief patrol, and ex-Det. Sgt. Alan Sharpe later pleaded guilty to misconduct. They were sentenced to probation and community service.Since the scandal, the foundation has donated funds to help authorities identify residents with cognitive disorders who go missing, donated police equipment and contributed reward money in high-profile cases, such as the recent homicide of a gas station attendant in Jericho.The scandal was not of concern this week when officials thanked each other for bringing the academy project to fruition. The foundation and the department are now hoping to put it all behind them and finally break ground on their original plan.“It’s a very exciting time in the department,” Krumpter said, speaking about the academy. “It’s a long time coming.”—With Timothy Bolgerlast_img read more

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Space and grandeur on offer in Sunnybank Hills

first_imgThe outdoor area at 64 The Avenue, Sunnybank Hills.Outside, there is sandstone paving, a built-in barbecue area and an outdoor kitchen on the covered patio. The property has two water features and the landscaping is by an award-winning landscape architect.The home is walking distance to nearby parks.Mrs Angus said the home was in a lovely, quiet neighbourhood. The property is being marketed by Eric Li and Fiona Tan of Ray White Sunnybank Hills. The kitchen at 64 The Avenue, Sunnybank Hills.The grand two-storey home has double front doors that open directly to the foyer and the statement staircase. There are formal living and dining rooms at the front of the home and an open-plan living, dining and kitchen area opening out to both the courtyard and the covered patio.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The updated kitchen has stone benchtops, two island benches, an integrated fridge, two dishwashers and bevelled mirrored cupboard doors. The open-plan living area at 64 The Avenue, Sunnybank Hills.There is also a media room with a bar on the ground floor, along with a laundry, bathroom and bedroom with built-in robe.Upstairs, the master suite has two walk-in robes and a marble ensuite with bath, dual basins and bevelled mirrored drawers.The three other bedrooms have built-in robes and there is a family bathroom.center_img The home at 64 The Avenue, Sunnybank Hills.THIS architect-designed home is on 918sq m block with beautifully landscaped gardens and plenty of street appeal. Owners Katreena and Peter Angus built the home at 64 The Avenue, Sunnybank Hills and recently updated and painted the property inside and out.“It’s a Mediterranean-inspired home and it has that resort feel about it,” Mrs Angus said.“The home was designed for entertaining with wide corridors, high ceilings and very spacious interiors. You could easily fit 150 people in the backyard for entertaining.” last_img read more

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