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Rock N’ Roll Resort Announces “The Grateful Escape” Lineup With Melvin Seals, Kung Fu, & More

first_imgToday, Rock N’ Roll Resort has officially announced the upcoming eighth edition of their unique musical weekend getaway. Dubbed “The Grateful Escape”, the event is set to take place from Friday, March 23rd to Sunday, March 25th at  Hudson Valley Resort & Spa in Kerhonkson, NY. Nestled 90 miles north of New York City in the Catskill Mountains, attendees will enjoy the venue’s newly-renovated facilities. As always, Rock N’ Roll Resort gives fans the chance to enjoy a festival atmosphere without the hassle of camping and the extra planning that goes along with it.This year’s artist lineup will be highlighted by two sets from Melvin Seals & JGB, two sets from the Golden Gate Wingmen, two sets from funk-rock fusion outfit Kung Fu, and a rare performance from psychedelic rock quartet The Breakfast.The Grateful Escape’s headlining acts draw from both the band members and the music of Jerry Garcia’s two most prominent projects: The Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia Band. Melvin Seals, Jerry’s longtime collaborator, is most revered for the powerful, high-spirited, Hammond B-3 organ, during his time playing the keys for Garcia Band. His unique funky-blues rock-gospel fusion earned him the nickname “Master of the Universe” from Jerry. The Golden Gate Wingmen, comprised of four longtime satellites in the Grateful Dead Universe (guitarist/vocalist John Kadlecik, keyboardist Jeff Chimenti, bassist Reed Mathis, and drummer Jay Lane) will honor the Dead portion of Garcia’s legacy with their energetic interpretation of the band’s classic songbook.Many additional acts are still to be announced that feature artists from a variety of styles and genres. Keep your eyes peeled for further announcements. Room info and packages, additional artist announcements, resort activities, directions and all event info can be found on the event website. Grab your weekend ticket and begin planning your Grateful Escape today!last_img read more

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HSPH graduates told that career flexibility key to personal, professional growth

first_imgIn his opening message at the 2012 Commencement ceremony on May 24, Dean Julio Frenk spoke about the importance of “career plasticity.”He quoted Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook, who said, “Fortune does favor the bold, and I promise that you will never know what you’re capable of unless you try.” Explaining why he chose to quote a business person instead of someone like Einstein, Pasteur, or even Plato, Frenk said that “tightly-defined career paths … are no longer the only routes to personal and professional achievement” for graduates of Harvard School of Public Health.Frenk noted that the day’s commencement speaker, HSPH alumnus Gerald Chan, went on to a “bold, non-traditional career path” as an entrepreneur and innovator, but has continued to work on improving people’s health.“No government—even that of the wealthiest nation—can afford to pay for all of the scientific research and public health programs that we require to keep people healthy,” Frenk said. “As a result, it is vital that we have people educated in science and public health who see opportunities where others see barriers—who are comfortable moving easily between the worlds of government, business, civil society, and academia, to improve people’s health.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Words aimed at action

first_imgAuthor and conservationist Terry Tempest Williams is the guest speaker Wednesday at the Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center, a new initiative convened by Dean of Arts and Humanities Robin Kelsey and history Professor Ian J. Miller. The forum is a three-year effort to highlight new work being done in the humanities on environmental issues. “It’s a catalytic move,” said Miller, who also serves as faculty associate at Harvard’s Center for the Environment. “The forum is meant to help better understand the impediments to changing attitudes in the face of an emerging climate crisis and the humanities have an important role to play.” The Williams event, which will be live-streamed from Tsai Auditorium, brings an “intellectual eloquence” to “understanding — and in fact creating —beauty and meaning in a changing world,” he added. “It sounds hokey, but it’s really important. Climate change demands a scientific and policy response. On a fundamental level, it demands a human response. She brings those abstract, rather grand problems into the personal.”The Gazette interviewed Williams, formerly of the University of Utah, now a visiting professor at Dartmouth, about the experience that brought her to the Harvard initiative. GAZETTE: Your talk kicks off the Environment Forum at Harvard, part of a push toward the environmental humanities. What roles do writing and the humanities play in environmental policy and combating climate change?WILLIAMS: The world is made of stories. The humanities help us to make sense of these stories. Environmental humanities creates a bridge between the internal and external landscape of stories. Writing becomes a process of this integration and exploration, both personal and political. I love that Harvard is thinking about this bridge and how academic rigor in the classroom and engagement in the world can be brought into a creative alliance. Our students are hungry for this. Climate justice is something they care deeply about. It is not an abstraction, but something that is affecting their lives, their future.We have to have room in the academy where students can go out and experience ideas on the ground. To me that’s what environmental humanities is about. Taking the text and the ideas explored in the classroom and then going out in real communities and finding themselves in relationship to a larger world. Call it ground-truthing.I think this is where deep leadership is fostered. At the University of Utah, fossil fuel development is not an abstraction. For our students to be able to talk to people working at the tar sands mine in Vernal, Utah, to hear them talk about their own lives and struggles, is both deeply humbling and instructive. Empathy ensues. It’s both personal and political and that sometimes makes people uncomfortable, but I don’t think you can separate them. I see this generation of students as pragmatic visionaries.GAZETTE: Can you give a little insight into the title of your talk? “The Hour of Land: Our National Parks as Breathing Spaces” references your new book, “The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks,” which is a personal journey through many national parks, but also makes a powerful case for protecting them.WILLIAMS: “The Hour of Land” is a testament to environmental humanities and there are ties to Harvard. Jorie Graham [Boylston Professor of Oratory Rhetoric, Department of English] is a trusted friend of mine. It was really her poem “We” that allowed me to see this book in a different way. She was generous enough to let me use 13 lines as the backbone and scaffolding of this book. I view this book in collaboration with this poem. Language and landscape are my inspiration. Collaboration is the way forward. All these ideas, a poetics of place alongside a politics of place, are interrelated and interconnected.GAZETTE: Earlier this year, you wrote in favor of permanent protection for land in Maine near Mount Katahdin. In August, President Obama turned those more than 87,000 acres into the new Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument. Why was that such an important step, and how did you get involved in the effort?WILLIAMS: I have deep roots in Maine. I care about these wildlands. This year was the 100th anniversary of Acadia National Park. Roxanne Quimby [co-founder of Burt’s Bees] with her generosity of spirit bought these lands with the intent to turn them over to the U.S. government. I so admire that we have these kinds of benefactors who are willing to use their wealth for the common good. Was there opposition? Yes. But what I so admired about her son Lucas St. Clair was that for the last five years he has gone door to door and talked to almost every citizen in that county and listened to them and is still listening. Together they created a space for conversation.GAZETTE: You’ve written passionately on nature and wildlife. Is there a story about how this interest began? WILLIAMS: My grandmother gave me “Peterson Field Guide to Birds of Western North America” when I was 5 years old. As a child, this was nothing short of magic. Those birds, those colored plates, became pages of my journal. I marked the date and place where I saw them for the first time. And then my family’s business, ironically, laid natural gas pipe throughout eight western states. My father is very proud of the scars he has made across the Interior West, doing that work. As children we would travel with him and camp. While the men in my family were viewing where the pipe would be laid and trenches dug, I would see the prairie dog towns, watch the red-tailed hawks and coyotes. My brothers would shoot them. Early on I saw this paradox, loving the land while destroying the land. It fueled my imagination.The kinds of tension that circulated around our dinner table — there were four generations — was more than heated. It was boiling. I remember one Christmas Eve, my father said, “It’s easy for you to talk about desert tortoises being endangered and write poems about them while our business is shut down because of the laws protecting them, but those poems don’t pay the bills.”GAZETTE: The National Park Service celebrates its centennial this year. How do you reconcile the popularity of the parks with the politics of cutbacks in federal funds and selling? If 300 million people visit each year, how do you make sense of the disconnect? And how do you reach those visitors in a way that empowers them? WILLIAMS: There has to be a tax or endowment to support our national parks. We are loving the parks to death, but we’re not willing to pay for them. There’s a deep resentment of federal control in this country, and it’s not just found in the West. I have talked to re-enactors in Gettysburg, for example, asking them what were the causes of the Civil War. They said it was fought over state rights, not slavery. The Civil War has never ended — I’m not sure we’ve ever healed those wounds. It comes back to the stories we tell ourselves. For far too long, it has been one story being told, white and privileged. This is changing as we now are seeing a mosaic of stories celebrated within our national parks, be it Native Americans [the Bear Ears National Monument proposal in Utah], African-Americans [the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument in Maryland], or Latinos [the Cesar E. Chavez National Monument in California].GAZETTE: In the winter, you and your husband purchased more than 1,100 acres in Utah at a Bureau of Land Management fossil fuel lease auction. Why did you take that bold step, and what are your plans for the land? WILLIAMS: I was in Paris during the U.N. Climate Conference. I participated in the red-line march to keep fossil fuels in the ground. As the Eiffel Tower came into view, I stopped and I thought, “Enough. I’ve been in enough protests and marches. I need to go home and begin my work there.” Utah for me is ground zero. On Feb. 16, I sat with a room full of bidders from the extractive industry at the quarterly Bureau of Land Management oil and gas lease auction. I had to join. My husband and I purchased two leases totaling 1,120 acres for $1.50 an acre, less than a cup of coffee. We are interested in exploring a different kind of energy, creative energy, the kind of energy that can fuel a movement to keep it in the ground. We have not yet received those leases from the BLM. We paid our money. They don’t know what to do with us. This is where I think it’s about putting our love into action.It’s not any one of these actions. It’s a mosaic that’s being created. This is what environmental humanities is on the ground. It is collaborative, transformative, and, I would argue, begs for student engagement. We have never been here before.Williams’ talk is at 6 p.m. on Wednesday at Tsai Auditorium S010, CGIS South. This interview was edited for length and clarity.last_img read more

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Zuma says South Africa Ready 50 Days Before World Cup Kick-Off

first_imgBy Dialogo April 23, 2010 South African President Jacob Zuma says his country is ready for the football World Cup, and predicts a memorable event. He was speaking during ceremonies 50 days before the tournament kicks-off on June 11. President Jacob Zuma told a crowd of fans in the central city of Kimberly that the football World Cup will allow South Africa to tell the story of a continent alive with possibilities, whose population embraces people from other nations and cultures. “This is the single, greatest opportunity we have ever had to showcase our diversity and potential to the world,” said President Zuma. Mr. Zuma said his government had spent nearly $5 billion on bolstering infrastructure for the World Cup and this would benefit the country for years to come. He said the preparations already have had a significant impact on the South African economy. Officials hope the World Cup will create 60,000 permanent new jobs and add nearly one billion dollars to economic production. Mr. Zuma said now is the time for all South Africans to take ownership of the event and create the conditions for its success. “We are ready in every respect and I believe that our warmth, our South African-ness is going to be displayed,” said Mr. Zuma. “We are going to be a nation that will behave, that will show the world that we are ready to host and that Africa is ready.” With seven weeks to go until kick-off, construction has been completed on all of the 10 stadiums that will host World Cup matches. The new terminal at Johannesburg’s international airport was inaugurated Tuesday and a new airport at the southeastern city of Durban, is to be inaugurated in two weeks. South African security forces say they have been carrying out crowd control and anti-terrorism training and measures have been put in place to protect visiting teams, foreign dignitaries and fans. Police officials have assigned 40,000 officers specifically to World Cup events and say they have spent $180 million on new equipment.last_img read more

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Can Government Clean Up Funky Lake Ronkonkoma?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The summers when 20th century celebrities such as Greta Garbo and Jackie Gleason frequented the beach resorts that hugged the shores of Lake Ronkonkoma are long gone. Now the pavilions have vanished, the shores are contaminated with trash, and the polluted water often poses a health threat. Twice in July swimming was banned because of high levels of bacteria.Considering its present condition, it’s hard to imagine that Lake Ronkonkoma ever drew thousands of people. Today it’s earned a reputation as a symbol of environmental neglect because an assortment of municipalities are either unwilling or unable to cut through the bureaucratic tangle of red tape that surrounds Long Island’s largest freshwater body.The policy failures resonate far beyond its shores. Between historic poor land-use decisions that placed unsewered homes around the lake leeching nitrogen into the water and unresolved municipal hand-wringing over how to best address the area’s economic blight, its ongoing plight serves as a microcosm of LI’s larger regional challenges.Thanks to the Island’s many layers of governance and a distinct lack of coordination among them, our environment suffers. Our wastewater woes continue unabated, traffic congestion goes unaddressed, and unwise development choices continue. Fragmentation is the enemy of regional cohesion and planning.Recently Suffolk County Legis. Leslie Kennedy (R-Nesconset), whose legislative district includes Lake Ronkonkoma, explained the complex situation to CBS reporter Jennifer McLogan.“The bottom of the lake is owned by the Town of Islip, and some of the shore,” Kennedy said. “The Town of Smithtown has a small portion, the Town of Brookhaven has a portion, and the County of Suffolk has a portion.”This municipal mix has led to inaction—a concept all too familiar to Long Islanders—when it comes to dealing with the debris and pollution that plague the lake.After featuring Lake Ronkonkoma in her upbeat historic retrospective, News 12 Long Island’s Danielle Campbell learned first-hand how the once charmed area of her youth had suffered after years of neglect.“My grandparents lived a block from the lake for more than 30 years,” Campbell recently told the Press. “I always knew the lake was in trouble. When I saw the burnt-out book store crumbling down into the lake’s shoreline, I knew something had to change.”Last September, the Book House, a book shop dating back to the early 1920s, burned to the ground after being shuttered for almost a decade. Its charred rubble spread from the shoreline into the water. According to Campbell, the county finally intends to address the issue this fall. But the question remains: Why did it take so long?To Campbell, Lake Ronkonkoma occupies the intersection of public funding and bureaucratic indifference.“Unfortunately, Lake Ronkonkoma is under the jurisdiction of four municipalities,” Campbell said. “Because of this, [the] responsibilities, goals and vision for the lake and its surrounding area are fragmented and unclear.”As a result, this mostly working-class area has been neglected for far too long.“It is hard to imagine other Suffolk County waterfront communities such as Stony Brook or Brightwaters facing a similar fate of dumped trash, piles of construction debris, broken glass, hypodermic needles and a water quality that at most times is deemed toxic,” she noted.She may be onto something. The Setauket Mill Pond in Frank Melville Park was choked and clogged with invasive weeds until a dedicated effort got underway that involved the park’s trust foundation, local residents, the local civic organization, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Town of Brookhaven. Together, they took concrete steps to forge a plan and address the issue.Meanwhile, Lake Ronkonkoma remains dirty and its beaches are strewn with litter. But this is a problem with a long history. Its water quality began deteriorating after World War II, when residences without sewers started multiplying around its shore.Since all lakes and streams on Long Island are fed by groundwater, Lake Ronkonkoma’s low water table has caused trouble for its homeowners, whose houses shouldn’t have been built there in the first place—a fact that residents and their realtors still seem to be largely unaware of. It’s led to headaches for those who had to fill their basements with cement to prevent flooding and to leaky cesspools discharging nitrogen into the lake. Local woes have grown while official responses have stagnated.In fact, the most actively involved branch of government in Lake Ronkonkoma seems to be the Suffolk Health Department, which is constantly banning swimming due to elevated bacteria levels after every heavy rainfall. A quick search on Google shows just how badly the water quality degrades after these runoffs.According to Campbell, an inter-municipal task force formed four years ago to address the lake’s woes, but they never met once. But change could finally be coming. Only recently, after residents came together and formed called the Lake Ronkonkoma Improvement Group, did this task force schedule a meeting for September.The flurry of activity and publicity is welcome. Meanwhile, the DEC must join with Suffolk County to curb the runoff that chokes the lake with bacteria and curb the nitrogen loadings, and the lake’s municipal partners must coordinate their efforts to clean up the debris and improve the area’s quality of life.Lake Ronkonkoma will never replace the Hamptons. But if our local governments can’t clean up a two-mile long lakefront, how can we trust them to protect our drinking water or preserve our open space?Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s esteemed master planner. More of his views can be found on TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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With the synergy of the public and private sector in Pazin, united in creating a new tourist offer

first_imgAll interested stakeholders from the area of ​​the City of Pazin and the narrower part of the Central Istria Tourist Board gathered in Pazin to work together to determine what makes Pazin unique. Workshops were held with the aim of designing a four-day tourist itinerary, and this is the next step in the implementation of the I-Archeo.S project.Namely, in January this year, the European project I-Archeo.S started. worth 1.176.243 euros, which includes six partners, the Abruzzo region, Teatro Marche from Ancona and Teatro Pubblico Pugliese from Italy and the City of Pazin, the Poreč Public Open University and the City of Crikvenica from Croatia. All six partners committed to work on the valorization of natural and cultural heritage and sustainable economic development by June 2019, when the project is implemented, with the aim of creating a concrete, innovative and sustainable tourist product, all outside the tourist season.The workshops were attended by all interested stakeholders from the area of ​​the city of Pazin from various cultural and tourist sectors, both public and private, who applied for the Public Invitation. During the two-day workshops, the workshops aimed to introduce the stakeholders to the I-Archeo.S project and to start designing a four-day thematic itinerary as well as forming a public-private cluster.At the beginning, the participants were introduced to the strategic guidelines for the development of tourism in Central Istria and the analysis of territories: special features of the territory, benchmarking and existing offers. On the first day, in addition to presenting the offer of stakeholders, they discussed the numerous, but still insufficiently recognized advantages of Pazin and how to make the best use of them. The second day for the workshop participants included the task of devising several topics for a tourist itinerary, which was then analyzed. The formation of the cluster and the design of the thematic itinerary will be worked on until the next workshop, which will be held in July and during which cooperation agreements will be signed.The new tourism product will be presented to tour operators in February 2019 to get acquainted with their content as well as the mobile application that will be realized within the project and which will serve as a form of promotion of Pazin tourism and a new itinerary. At the next workshop, to be held from 9 to 11 July, stakeholders will define the final thematic tourism itinerary. All those interested in participating can still get involved by responding to the invitation that will be published on the website of the City of Pazin.Get involved, because only with the synergy of the public and private sector can we achieve success, and they are well aware of that in Istria.last_img read more

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Survey: 23% of Croats are seriously planning a holiday in Croatia

first_imgThe results of the regular MasterIndex survey published today, conducted for Mastercard by the Improve agency, show that a third of Croatians are planning a holiday in the country. Cover photo: Pixabay.com However, the corona crisis and the uncertainty it brings have also affected the fact that only 23% of respondents are seriously planning a holiday in Croatia, which is as much as 33% less than last year. The coronavirus pandemic negatively affected the online purchase of airline tickets, tickets for cultural events, and travel arrangements, which approximately two-thirds of respondents bought less than usual, as expected. However, almost a third of respondents (31%) are planning a summer vacation in the country, but they are not entirely sure whether they will realize it.  The MasterIndex online survey on the habits of using financial services in Croatia and attitudes towards payment cards was conducted in April 2020 for Mastercard by the market research agency Improve, on a sample of 1.046 users of banking services in Croatia aged 18 to 55.  As the main reasons for not planning a vacation in the Adriatic, respondents point out financial insecurity (30%), the fact that they live on the coast (25%) and the impact of the pandemic (28%) – whether they do not believe in its end by early summer (17%) or in turn because they feel safer at home and try to reduce the risk of infection (11%).last_img read more

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Property expert Andrew Winter reveals his biggest selling no-nos

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:22Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:22 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels576p576p540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter’s Spring Selling Tips01:23HE’S the man who can sell the unsellable home.But even property expert Andrew Winter admits he’s made mistakes that may have cost him a sale.So, with spring selling season in full swing, who better to ask how to not put buyers off when it comes to getting a house ready for sale than the host of Love It Or List It Australia and Selling Houses Australia. Here are his top five selling no-nos:TOP FIVE SELLING NO-NOS1. THE DIRTY TOILETRemember to clean the toilet. Picture: GettyIn his 25 years as a real estate agent, Mr Winter has been inside thousands of homes and seen just about all the selling mistakes you can think of.But he said what continued to shock him was how many homeowners were prepared to try to sell a property without simply cleaning it.Some of the biggest buyer turn-offs included an unclean toilet, dirty laundry and unmade beds, Mr Winter said.“In fact anything dirty!”2. PERSONAL TOUCHESThought about adding your own flavour to the home before showing it off to someone else?A few pieces of statement art, perhaps, or that water feature you’ve been wanting to buy for the living room.Maybe hold off.“Very strong colours, certain design features that only you will like … you have to tone it all down because some things can actually put buyers off,” Mr Winter said.3. A BAD FIRST IMPRESSIONMr Winter said it was important the first point of contact in a home was fit to make a good first impression.If the paint is peeling off your front gate, paint it.If your security intercom is dirty and cracked, clean it or have it replaced.Otherwise, Mr Winter warns it could send out “all the wrong signals” to potential buyers.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour ago4. PESKY PETSMake sure potential buyers don’t see any mess created by your pets. Picture: GettyRemember it’s not just yourself you have to clean up after, but your pets too!“In the garden, the dogs can leave their messages,” Mr Winter said.“The cat’s litter tray, and even nasty odours — all can come from your pets, so don’t forget the pesky pet!”5. BEING UNPREPAREDRemember you’re not the only one trying to sell a home.Spring selling season is the most competitive time of year for buyers and sellers, with more homes to choose from.Mr Winter said it paid to know who your competition was and get ahead of them.“Know what you’re up against,” he said.“That way you can fight against the other listings and come out a winner.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:18Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:18 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels576p576p540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenSpring selling & buying tips with Andrew Winter01:18last_img read more

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Medsafe investigating claims on cannabis billboard

first_imgStuff co.nz 18 December 2019Family First Comment: “A spokesman for Medsafe, the regulator for medicines and medical devices,​ said it was not correct to say that all cannabis is medicine.”Exactly.Read our summarywww.SayNopeToDope.org.nz/medicinalMedsafe is “looking into” New Zealand’s first cannabis advertising campaign.The Advertising Standards Authority received several complaints this week after a billboard advertising cannabis as medicine was erected on Auckland’s Anzac Ave.Helius Therapeutics, a licensed medicinal cannabis company, launched the billboards following last week’s legalisation of medicinal cannabis manufacture, to “rebrand” cannabis.A spokesman for Medsafe, the regulator for medicines and medical devices,​ said it was not correct to say that all cannabis is medicine.“Sativex is the only cannabinoid product approved by Medsafe in New Zealand…Medsafe is aware of this campaign and is looking into it.”READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/109435600/medsafe-investigating-claims-on-cannabis-billboardlast_img read more

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Duterte: Water firms liable for graft, plunder

first_imgPresident Duterte made the statement as the Department of Justice announced that it is working to revise the concession agreements with Maynilad and Manila Water after they found several “onerous” provisions in the deals. MANILA – President Rodrigo Dutertewanted to talk with the people behind the controversial 1997 water concessionagreements as he insisted on not paying the Maynilad and Manila Water. “Hindi ito maareglo hangga’t hindi ko makausap ‘yung mga (water) concessionaire,” says President Rodrigo Duterte. PCOO The President also claimed that the water companies have cheated the public of trillions of pesos for passing corporate income tax payments to the consumers and for their failure to establish wastewater treatment facilities “Kaya sabi ko, paano mo aregluhin ‘yan ngayon? They say na, “aregluhin natin.” How? How will I compromise? It’s plunder. That is the classic economic plunder. How can now I tell the people as President: Adre, p***, aregluhin na lang natin ‘to. Tell me. Tell me those f****… Tell me kung papaano ko sabihin sa tao?” he added.center_img “Trillion ‘to, sobra. The fact alone that all these years we were paying a fee para sa water treatment but it’s never came into being all these years. Then corporate income tax was passed on to the Filipino people,” Duterte said. “Kayagusto ko silang makausap. Hindi itomaareglo hangga’t hindi ko makausap ‘yungmga concessionaires,” the President said in a speech at the Malacañang onMonday evening. The President last week threatened to pursue economic sabotage charges against the water distributors as he claimed that Filipinos were being “milked by billions.”/PNlast_img read more

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