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Works Wonders wins Innovations in American Government Award

first_img Read Full Story The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, a leading research center at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, today named Works Wonders, a job training and placement initiative in Rhode Island aimed at youth who have aged out of — or are about to age out of — state care, as the winner of the 2018 Innovations in American Government Award. The award was presented to Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo ’93 on Dec. 12, at a ceremony at the State House.“Works Wonders is an outstanding program that helps foster kids in Rhode Island reach their full potential,” said Gov. Gina Raimondo. “Through a partnership with two state agencies and Foster Forward, Rhode Island is meeting a crucial need for a population that is too often underserved. This would not have been possible without the foster youth who were both co-creators and participants in the program — and absolutely instrumental to its success. I also want to thank the teams at the Department of Labor and Training, the Department of Children, Youth, and Families and particularly the folks at Foster Forward for their steadfast commitment to Rhode Island. I’m honored that the Ash Center at Harvard Kennedy School is recognizing this important work and awarding Works Wonders the 2018 Innovations in American Government Award.”Works Wonders program participant Tobias Bear spoke at the awards ceremony about the impact of the program on his life. Photo by Sarah GruczaRhode Island’s Works Wonders program was recognized by the Innovations Award Program at the Ash Center for its groundbreaking approach to filling the gap between traditional workforce development programs, which are traditionally aimed at adults, and youth-centric programs which assume a level of parental engagement. The program involves adolescents ages 16-21 in a rounded support system that addresses both hard and soft skills. Participating youth have access to education, peer support, counseling, experiential learning opportunities, and ultimately, paid jobs, vocational programs, and continued educational opportunities.  A recent research study showed that Works Wonders has an 83 percent completion rate and participants are 37 percent more likely to be employed as compared to those who didn’t participate in the program.“Rhode Island’s Works Wonders is an exemplar of how a range of stakeholders can come together to identify and meet the needs of an underserved group,” said Stephen Goldsmith, Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and the Director of the Innovations in American Government Program at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. “The award selection committee was unanimous in voting for Works Wonders as this year’s winner. We hope that this recognition will help the program scale and its award-winning attributes be adopted by other jurisdictions.”Additional ResourcesWatch Works Wonders present at the 2018 Innovations in American Government Award Finalists event.Visit the Ash Center website for more information about the Innovations in American Government Awards, to explore previous winners, and to sign up for our newsletter for upcoming information about the next award cycle.last_img read more

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Building Cities of Tomorrow with Ford

first_imgThe promise of continued advancement of technology is a massive opportunity for our world’s cities. As we sit in traffic, circle a block for parking, or brake for a pedestrian, we long for new and smarter ways for mobility in cities to become more livable and sustainable. We at Dell Technologies believe that the scale and complexity of mobility in cities – where over half the world’s population now lives – is matched only by its absolute importance to everyday lives.We are proud to work with Ford and other corporate partners to help deliver on this promise through the City of Tomorrow Challenge. This program looks at three cities: Pittsburgh, Miami, and Grand Rapids, Michigan and provides a platform for collaboration between citizens, corporations like us, and nonprofits to propose and pilot solutions to improve mobility. This design-led approach from Ford puts an emphasis on listening to the community through qualitative and quantitative research, co-creation from a wide range of stakeholders, and landing on a real, tangible pilot.The ideas coming into the platform or through the community workshops reflect the unique characteristics of the three communities. In Pittsburgh, one contributed idea is to build new affordable light rail over the old industrial rail infrastructure. Another idea is a call for wayfinding for walking paths that avoid hills and construction. Another idea points out the lack of public transportation for the city’s east side.In Miami, with the 10th worst traffic on the planet,  conversation on the site is dominated with ideas to reduce time on the road. Contributors point out specific choke points, ask for new public transit solutions or, my favorite, recommend that everyone re-take a driver’s test. In Grand Rapids, however, people have an average of a 20-minute commute. Traffic is simply not an issue. This city has an opportunity to, say, rethink parking in the downtown area, or enhance bike paths or walkability.What ideas do you have? Please check out the Challenge website to share your experiences, sign up for community working sessions, and offer insight into the variety of ways people move around the targeted cities today. In early July, the application period will open and participants can submit their ideas for a chance to win up to $100K in pilot funding to test their solutions.In September, semi-finalists will be selected to attend a prototyping session and receive mentoring support to refine their ideas before submitting a final pilot proposal. During the Challenge’s concluding stage, a prize of $100,000 will be awarded to the winner, who will be given the opportunity to use those funds to conduct pilot programs in partnership with their city, Ford, and other corporate partners.This type of challenge perfectly aligns with our purpose, which is to create technologies that drive human progress. We are participating in the challenge alongside the cities and Ford and look forward to sharing ideas and learnings from experiences we’ve had in digital cities projects from around the world.  We will learn from this project as well – and use this knowledge to better support our customers.We believe we can play a key role in making Ford’s vision real. We have built our unique family of companies on the idea that progress lives at the intersection of technology and humanity. Where better to further this idea than in some of the world’s great cities?last_img read more

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A Father’s Choice: How Frank Havens Brought Home the Gold

first_imgIn 1924, canoeist Bill Havens had a choice: compete in the Olympics or witness the birth of his child. Bill chose the latter, and 28 years later, that child, Frank Havens, brought the gold medal home from the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki. Today, the Havens family is still on the water, including the now 92-year-old Olympic medalist Frank.Georgetown, Maryland. 1924. Brothers Bill and Bud Havens, former Mid-Atlantic wrestling champions, are standing at the threshold of a very different athletic benchmark: becoming the first canoeists to represent the United States in Paris at the Summer Olympics.It’s the first year canoe sprint has ever been an event at the Olympics. Bill, 27, and Bud, 21, compete against 20 other paddlers in the Olympic Trials to earn their place on a four-man canoe crew. For months, the brothers train day and night on the Potomac River with the Washington Canoe Club, preparing their physical and mental fortitude for the games. Bill, undefeated in both the one-man single and double blade events, has high hopes of bringing home the gold.But just weeks before the team is set to sail for Paris, Bill is forced to face reality—his expecting wife is due sometime in late July, the exact time at which Bill will be competing on the other side of the globe. The decision, though not easy, is obvious. Bill forfeits his spot on the team, and just four days after the games (at which Bud Havens and the rest of the U.S. canoe crew win three gold, one silver, and two bronze over six events), his son Frank came into the world.Bill never made it to the Olympics, though he continued to compete with his brother close to home. However, his sons Bill “Junior” and Frank, did. After serving in the Army Air Corps during World War II, the second generation of brothers qualified for the 1948 Olympics in London. Junior, largely considered the better paddler of the two, placed fifth in the solo 1,000-meter canoe race. Frank, surprising even himself, came home with a silver medal in the solo 10,000-meter event.Image courtesy of the Havens family.Buoyed by their 1948 Olympic success, the brothers moved in together in Vienna, Va., to train for the 1952 games. Their coach was none other than their father Bill. Junior and Frank spent the better part of the ensuing four years on the water, training to compete together as a tandem canoe team.“Even in practice they were beating the world record,” says Dodge Havens, one of Junior’s three sons. “It was pretty much guaranteed they were going to get a gold.”But Olympic disappointment struck again during the winter of 1951. Junior, who worked as a schoolteacher off the water, was helping a colleague move a car that had been buried by snow when he lacerated the tendons in one of his hands. In a matter of minutes, his chance for Olympic glory was gone.Frank, as his Uncle Bud had done 28 years prior, departed for the 1952 games in Helsinki without his brother Junior. With a time of 57:41, Frank set the new world record and took home the gold in the solo 10,000-meter event. In a telegraph addressed to his father after the games, Frank said, “Dear Dad, thanks for waiting around for me to get born in 1924. I’m coming home with the gold medal you should have won. Your loving son, Frank.”“Dear Dad, thanks for waiting around for me to get born in 1924. I’m coming home with the gold medal you should have won. Your loving son, Frank.”Frank competed in the Olympic masters division in 1956 in Melbourne and 1960 in Rome, but he never podiumed again. To date, Frank is the only American canoeist to win gold in a solo single blade event. Like their father and uncle, Frank and Junior continued to compete well into their 60s. The brothers, who preferred to race as a tandem team, regularly crushed the competition on both the national and international stages.“He was never bitter about it,” Dodge says about his father’s unfortunate mishap before the ’52 Olympics. “He was very proud of his younger brother’s success. They loved to race together in tandem events. They were pretty much unbeatable. Even when they were in their 60s and 70s, they’d high kneel [the traditional stance for canoeing] and beat everybody’s butts, even the 25-year-olds.”Between 1936 and 1953, Junior won 19 National Canoe Tilting Championships. Frank went on to be a six-time National Paddling Single Blade Champion. In 1985, at the age of 61, he competed in seven different events at the World Masters Games in Toronto and won every single one. In 1995, Frank was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame, a testament to his storied past and countless accomplishments.Frank (second from left) and brother Junior (second from right) practice for the Olympics. / Image courtesy of the Havens family.Frank, now age 92, is still on the water nearly every day. Though he last competed in his late ’80s with his son Dan, he’s proud to see that the spirit of the river has been passed down from generation to generation. Dan, age 65, and his son Sean have continued the tradition of training with the Washington Canoe Club. They both compete in the growing East Coast outrigger racing scene and regularly place in the top three.Junior’s sons Dodge, Keith, and Kirk are also accomplished paddlers and hold multiple Whitewater Open Canoe Downriver National Championships. All three competed in the Olympic Trials for the 1980 and 1984 Olympics, but didn’t make the cut. Keith’s sons Zane and Zaak also join their father and uncles among the nation’s top canoeists and have been competing and winning National Championships since the age of 10. Zane has been serving off and on for the past year as a crewmember aboard the Hōkūle‘a, a Polynesian voyaging canoe that has been circumnavigating the world.“I don’t know whether it’s in our blood or in the culture,” says Dodge, but according to Frank, being a Havens family member is synonymous with being a canoeist. You can’t be one without the other.Frank Havens, pictured in front of his “Bachelor Camp” along the banks of the Potomac, where he lived and trained. / Image courtesy of the Havens family.Q+A WITH FRANK HAVENSWhat’s your earliest memory of being on the water?FH: We were all brought up on the Potomac River. We had a camp on the river and my grandfather built this place. There was a huge room where we could congregate and have meals and stuff. I can’t remember when I couldn’t swim, so I guess somebody must have taught me early.What was your relationship like with your brother, Junior?As a young kid, Bill [Junior] being five years older, I used to follow him around like a puppy. He was the man. In high school he was Mr. Everything. He had such a reputation. He was phenomenal at everything he did. My aim at that time was to be as good as my brother Bill was. My brother was my main competition for a long time, especially in training. Early on, Junior was the best that was around. Having him out there to push me, I’m sure I got a lot better because he was around. I didn’t get to the point where I could whip him until we were both Olympic caliber.Frank, age 92, still gets on the water almost every day. / Image by Priscilla Knight for a story in Cooperative Living Magazine.How did you end up with the solo 10,000-meter as your signature event?My dad recognized early that Bill Junior used to push me hard in the 1,000-meter, but as I progressed, he recognized I had the capacity to do longer distances. I was always pretty good in staying with it and being able to get into a rhythm that would move the boat. I did better the longer the race was. It just came naturally.Do you remember what it was like when you arrived in London for the ’48 games?We went to London on a boat from New York and came in at Southampton. When we got there, the Germans had been bombing Britain all during the war, so Southampton still had burned out buildings there on the waterfront. London was still a mess. They put us [the athletes] in an evacuees’ camp. We were over there for six weeks. That’s where it all started. I started to come into my own a bit at those games.After the ’48 Olympics, you and your brother decide to train together for the ’52 games in Helsinki. What was that like?We moved in together, bought a house out in Vienna, and really hit it hard for four years. He was a schoolteacher in Arlington and I worked for an appraisal company. We would train early in the morning and after work, two workouts a day in the Olympic years. I can remember paddling the Potomac when it was pitch dark but we knew that river like the back of our hand so we never had any trouble with it. Our dad was our coach and he pushed you hard.When Junior injured his hand and had to give up his chance to go to the Olympics, you kept going. In what way did your brother still help you prepare for the games?We had planned to go to Helsinki as a tandem. We had trained tandem so long that I think I was able to increase my stroke rate which doesn’t sound like much but it takes some doing when you’re already paddling somewhere in the high 50s strokes-per-minute. To pick it up was something else.What is one thing you remember about your father and coach, Bill?High kneeling, it’s all about getting the blade in the water as far forward as you can and getting at it from your hip. It’s a rotation of your upper body from the butt up. My dad always said, “If you didn’t have such a big butt, you wouldn’t be as good as you are.”How did you feel going into the games? Nervous? Excited?I was always in Bill Junior’s shadow, like all my life. Up until ’48, I had never done anything that was “outstanding.” When I won the Olympic trials that year, that’s when everything changed for me. The girl I was really interested in decided I was finally a keeper. Everything seemed to start working out then.Walk me through the day of the race, from the start to the finish line.I was behind at first. I didn’t have a great start. In the finals there were a dozen competitors. I think I was probably in the first five out there. I remember passing the German, mainly because he made a grunt when I went by. And then all that was in front of me was the Czech and the Hungarian. I could see they were riding each other’s wake a little bit. Every time we’d come to a turn, they would come as close to the buoy as you can. Really they were kinda blocking me out on the turns, but I was still in the top three, so as long as I hung in there I knew I could possibly catch them if I had anything left. When we came to the final turn, they let a little gap out while they were changing positions. I put the bow of my boat right in that gap and gave it just about all I could. When we came out of that turn and headed into the last 1,500 meters I was probably a deck’s length ahead of them. I could see them in my peripheral vision. I knew they were right there. I think I only won by 12 seconds.Not only did you win that year but you also set a new world record. What did that accomplishment feel like?I was completely exhausted after this one. My teammate picked me up and handed me a flag and carried me around on his shoulders. It was quite an ending to a day. If it hadn’t been for a squeaky pully at the podium, I’d have cried, but when they were raising the flag, the damn pully was squeaking so it got my attention. That thing should have been lubricated.How soon were you back on the water after the ’52 Olympics?I had a day or two off, then I had to go back to work. I raced the Nationals in Philadelphia the next weekend.How has the sport of canoeing changed since you first started paddling?The single blade boat that I raced in at Helsinki, you never see any of those anymore in world competition. They have a boat now that is so narrow, I don’t know if I could get my knee in it. We paddled 17-footers that weighed about 47 pounds, something like that. Pushing [a canoe] for an hour on one knee, well, we did it so many times it was just routine. But the boat I raced in Helsinki would not be comparable to anything they race today.You and your brother continued to race for many decades after the Olympics. What were some of your favorite races?We raced the Canadian Masters for years and the World Masters. We really kicked butt in the World Masters after we were no longer Olympic-type paddlers. Of course, you’re paddling in age groups, so it got awful easy when you only had people within five years of your age to compete against. We went to Denmark and Sweden. We took a crew to Hong Kong, did an awful lot of paddling around the world. It was quite a life we had.Do you still paddle today?I hate to admit it, but I sit and do it now. I had a knee operation several years ago. I’m paddling a regular canoe. It’s a beast but I know I won’t have any problem staying in it. I’m not going today because it’s pretty damn cold, but I’m on the water most every day.last_img read more

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Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador Create Joint Anti-Narcotics Force

first_img Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador will form a joint force to confront organized crime, particularly the Mexican Los Zetas cartel, Guatemalan President Álvaro Colom announced in an interview published by a Mexican newspaper. In the face of the threat from drug-trafficking cartels, “we should unite to strike them, dominate them, and reduce them to the minimum,” Colom said in an interview with the daily El Universal. The Central American countries are “strangled” between two routes that run to the United States along the Pacific and the Atlantic, Colom added. The president specified that the plan to create a multinational force will be debated at the Central American Integration System summit to be held in June. “The solution has to be regional: a Mesoamerican Security and Justice Plan, with the support and co-responsibility of the United States,” he explained. Colom added that the Central American nations will also seek the support of Mexico and Colombia in order to improve border coordination. Colom launched an offensive against Los Zetas in December with the imposition of a state of emergency, which will extend until April, in the department of Alta Verapaz, on the border with Mexico. Around 250 tons of cocaine enter the United States annually by way of the so-called Central American Route, of which Guatemala is a part, according to U.S. embassy data. By Dialogo February 02, 2011last_img read more

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Sound Beach Man Charged With Fatal Hit-and-run

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A suspected hit-and-run driver has been arrested for allegedly killing a 40-year-old woman while the victim was walking in her hometown of Miller Place last year, Suffolk County police said.Christopher Campbell, 35, of Sound Beach, was charged Tuesday with leaving the scene of an incident without reporting involving a fatality.Vehicular Crimes Unit detectives said that the suspect was driving a box truck eastbound on North Country Road when he struck Tracy Mangino while she was walking along the road shortly after 11 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014.The victim died at John T. Mather Hospital Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson.Campbell will be arraigned Tuesday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img read more

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NASA astronauts aim for Florida coast to end SpaceX flight

first_imgCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The first astronauts launched by Elon Musk’s SpaceX company have left the International Space Station for the final and most important part of their test flight: returning to Earth with a rare splashdown. It will be the first splashdown for astronauts in 45 years — and the first return of a crew by SpaceX. NASA’s Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken bid farewell to the three men left behind as their SpaceX Dragon capsule undocked Saturday night. center_img The capsule is headed toward a Sunday afternoon descent into the Gulf of Mexico near Pensacola, on the opposite side of Florida from approaching Tropical Storm Isaias.last_img read more

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MRT Jakarta drafts new business model amid falling ridership

first_imgCity-owned public transportation company PT MRT Jakarta is reviewing plans to switch to a new business model after suffering a dramatic fall in ridership during large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) for the COVID-19 outbreak.“[The new business plan] will provide new business values for MRT Jakarta. This is what we call ‘business beyond normal’,” MRT Jakarta president director William Sabandar said during a press briefing on Thursday.He added that the model would combine three business components he referred to as “beyond ridership, beyond physical mobility and beyond transport network”. The beyond physical mobility component will focus on virtual mobility to develop digital businesses, including the use of websites and social media for advertising and other commercial purposes.The operator recently launched MRTJ accelerator with aims to collaborate with start-ups in its digital activities. The program was slated to start between August and September.“MRT Jakarta is inviting local start-ups to help us develop digital ecosystems along MRT Jakarta routes and MRT Jakarta TOD areas,” William said, referring to the transit-oriented development.Read also: MRT Jakarta delays phase 2 construction amid COVID-19 outbreakThe approach is in line with the beyond transport network component, which will focus on not only developing more routes but also connecting areas around MRT stations for urban regeneration, especially in the upcoming second phase of the MRT Jakarta, which stretches from the Hotel Indonesia traffic circle in Central Jakarta to Kota in West Jakarta.The number of MRT Jakarta passengers dropped dramatically during the implementation of PSBB measures between April and June. The operator served an average of 90,000 to 100,000 passengers daily between January and mid-March, but the number dropped to 5,000 in April and 2,000 in May.Since the city began easing restrictions on Monday, the number of passengers has slowly risen to 13,000 a day.“However, the increase is yet to be significant because some businesses and malls have yet to resume operations until [June 15],” William said, projecting the figure to rise to 60,000 to 70,000 in July.Topics : As the MRT operator can no longer rely on ridership as a business parameter, it will prioritize non-farebox income in its beyond ridership scheme while promoting the branding value of living a healthy lifestyle.Read also: MRT Jakarta back to normalcy, but with limited capacityEmpty spaces in MRT stations will be used for coworking spaces equipped with various features, including video conferencing.In addition, MRT Jakarta will push for the development of mobile ticketing, smart vending machines, cashless retail transactions, online training for start-ups and small and medium-sized businesses as well as delivery services.last_img read more

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Most Kiwis support euthanasia for those with painful, incurable diseases

first_imgStuff co.nz 13 January 2017Just 12 per cent of Kiwis are completely opposed to the legalisation of assisted dying, according to a University of Auckland study.In a survey of 15,822 people, 66 per cent supported euthanasia as a legal means of ending the lives of people with painful, incurable diseases.“There is strong public support for euthanasia when people are asked whether doctors should be allowed by law to end the life of a patient with a painful incurable disease upon their request,” concluded the authors, led by post-graduate psychology student Carol Lee.The results were taken from the 2014-15 New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (NZAVS) survey, which Lee said provided “reliable demographic and personality differences in support for euthanasia”.Non-religious, younger, employed, rural people were more likely to support euthanasia, the authors said.Bob McCoskrie, spokesman for Family First, rejected the survey’s findings, labelling it a “weak, incomplete survey, drawing dubious conclusions, by its own admission”.“It appears to be set on finding the answer it wants, despite its own admission of significant limitations.”READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/euthanasia-debate/88349694/most-kiwis-support-euthanasia-for-those-with-painful-incurable-diseasesMost New Zealanders support euthanasia, study suggestsNewsHub 13 January 2017A majority of New Zealanders support euthanasia, according to a new study.More than 15,000 people took part in the 2014/15 New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study which, for the first time, included a question on assisted dying.Respondents were asked: “Suppose a person has a painful incurable disease. Do you think that doctors should be allowed by law to end the patient’s life if the patient requests it?”Sixty-six percent of participants were in support, 21.7 percent indicated they were neutral/unsure and 12.3 percent were strongly opposed.The researchers found non-religious, younger, employed, and rural people were more likely to support euthanasia, whereas people with lower income, who were parents, or of Pacific or Asian ethnicity tended to be less supportive.“Because we have such a national representative example of New Zealanders, findings of our study are likely to reflect what the general New Zealand public over the age of 18 think about this issue,” study author, University of Auckland masters student, Carol Lee says.READ MORE: http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/health/2017/01/most-new-zealanders-support-euthanasia-study-suggests.htmlNZ study shows strong euthanasia supportNZ City 13 January 2017Most New Zealanders support assisted dying for patients with painful terminal conditions, Auckland University researchers have found.Nearly 16,000 people were surveyed for the research, published in the New Zealand Medical Journal on Friday, which also found demographic and personality differences in people’s opinions on the issue.Two thirds were in favour when asked if a doctors should be allowed to end the life of a patient with a painful incurable disease if the patient requested it.Just 12 per cent were opposed, while 22 per cent said they were neutral.Act Party leader David Seymour, who is seeking to have his End of Life Choice member’s bill put before parliament, says it’s now impossible to deny public support for assisted dying.“The sample size of this survey eclipses previous polling on this topic, while also backing up previous findings: New Zealanders support the right to an assisted death for the painfully ill,” he said.The wording of the poll has been questioned by Family First’s Bob McCoskrie, who argues the scenario of a person suffering a painful death is no longer valid thanks to “the availability and effectiveness of palliative care”.Mr Seymour admitted polling could be influenced by the wording but rejected the views of Mr McCoskrie and other deniers as “living in dreamland”.READ MORE: http://home.nzcity.co.nz/news/article.aspx?id=240758Desperate euthanasia opponents are dishonest or innumerateScoop 13 January 2017READ MORE: http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA1701/S00030/desperate-euthanasia-opponents-are-dishonest-or-innumerate.htm Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Al-Shabab attacks UAE embassy in Somalia

first_img“We targeted enemy delegates from the UAE and we inflicted casualties upon them and their forces,” Sheikh Abdiasis Abu Musab, Shabaab’s military operation spokesman told Reuters.“The incident took place near the military hospital where UAE trains Somali military. Three Somali military who were on the military pick up died and several other civilians who were passing by were injured,” he added.“We have confirmed the death of six people, four of them civilians, while six others were also wounded, some seriously,” police officer Abdukadir Hassan told AFP.He said no UAE diplomats were hurt in the attack, with the Somali security staff escorting them stopping the bomber with their truck as the blast went off.The Shabab said they carried out the attack, which is believed to be the first time the al-Qaeda affiliate has targeted the UAE in Somalia. The UAE is involved in a number of security, infrastructure, development and humanitarian projects in Somalia.In the past, al Shabaab has exaggerated the number of government members it has killed, while officials have played down losses. Somalia’s Al-Shabab insurgents killed at least six people Wednesday in a suicide attack on a diplomatic convoy from the United Arab Emirates in the Somali capital Mogadishu, police and the Islamists said.last_img read more

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Stockdale: We’ll pick ourselves up

first_imgDavid Stockdale believes both nerves and naivety cost Fulham dear in Saturday’s 2-2 draw against Hull, which left Felix Magath’s side in the Barclays Premier League relegation zone with just two games remaining. Goals from Ashkan Dejagah and Fernando Amorebieta had put the hosts in the driving seat at Craven Cottage, but the Tigers hit back through Nikica Jelavic and Shane Long. The point was not enough to move Fulham out of the bottom three and, with a trip to Stoke looming before the final-day visit of Crystal Palace, goalkeeper Stockdale has pinpointed where they went wrong last weekend. When asked if it was nerves or naivety that allowed Hull back into the game, Stockdale replied: “All of the above. “When you are anxious to get the 90 minutes over and take the three points, things can go astray. There was a lot of tension in the ground and we did things that we would not normally do at home. That was our downfall.” With Sunderland winning 4-0 at home to Cardiff on Sunday, Fulham now sit 19th in the table but just one point from safety. Stockdale, who was promoted to the Premier League while on loan at Hull last season, reckons Fulham can still survive if they do not let Saturday’s disappointment linger. “It is important we pick ourselves up now,” he added. “It is points we need at this stage of the season. We can’t change the Hull result now so we have to go and win our remaining two games. “Three points against Stoke on Saturday and we are right back in it. If we play anything like we did in the first 75 minutes, we will be okay. We need a few teams to help us out now as well.” Captain Brede Hangeland has helped stave off relegation in previous seasons at Craven Cottage and feels it is now time for the whole Fulham squad to show what they are made of. “This is where, as a player, you really show your character and be accountable,” the Norway defender said. “It’s easy enough to play well when you’re 5-0 up and cruising at the top of the league, but now it’s a bit different and you need strong characters. “We all know the stakes. It’s do or die for us at the moment, so I don’t think it will be a problem to motivate people this week.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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