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Video: Praying for a holy land

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI December 27, 2012 at 11:12 am The important work of the Diocese of Jerusalem is a gift to those they serve of all faith traditions. Education and compassionate healthcare are offered throughout Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon. The Holy Land is the root of our faith tree. We must support those who labor as stewards of this land and this tradition. Learn more about the Diocese at http://www.j-diocese.org or their humanitarian work at http://www.afedj.org. Consider a visit which will transform your life in ways you don’t expect. And John McCann, let’s talk. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Anne Lynn says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 December 25, 2012 at 12:46 pm Beautiful. Truth and hope is always beautiful.Yes, pray, but be that supporter and advocate.Merry Christmas Rector Shreveport, LA By Matthew DaviesPosted Dec 25, 2012 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Middle East, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Video Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and the Middle East runs more than 30 education and healthcare institutions throughout Israel, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and the Palestinian Territories, bringing vital services and a much-needed lifeline to the local community.The diocese and many of its institutions operate against a backdrop of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that has lasted for more than 60 years. The Christian minority is increasingly emigrating in search of a better life and better opportunities overseas.The living stones of the holy land and the ministry of the Christian institutions encourage people from all over the world to invest in the region, but more support and advocacy is needed to ensure the Christian presence remains.The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem has been instrumental in ministering to the needs of the community and working with its ecumenical partners towards achieving peace in the holy land. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Israel-Palestine, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rev, Vicki Gray says: Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (3) Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC John McCann says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Video: Praying for a holy land Cathedral Dean Boise, ID December 25, 2012 at 5:09 pm I am an active lay member of the Trinity Wall Street & St. Paul’s Chapel in New York, which stand as places of pilgrimage for those in search of world peace. These two venerable churches, St. Paul’s being the oldest in New York, are literally a block from the site of the World Trade Center, and their survival, and mission of ministering to the first responders brought the response of the first responders. They have also become places of ecumenical sharing- St Paul’s is sharing its space with a young synagogue, Tamid. I am in the midst of studying the 3 Abrahamic religions, and taking the EFM theological course which lasts for four years. In a couple of years I would like to begin conversations about how I can bring my discerned vocation of social action, and religious dialogue to the Diocese of Jerusalem, your work is a beacon of hope in these times of trouble. Christmas blessings to you!last_img read more

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6 Symptoms Men Shouldn’t Ignore

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! It’s true. Men are notorious for putting off doctor visits. Many think they’re invincible or can’t be bothered. And others only seek medical attention when they’re at death’s door — or when their wives, sisters, mothers, daughters or friends prod them into going.While every symptom may not warrant a doctor’s visit, some seemingly minor signs shouldn’t be ignored. Below are six danger signs you can help him watch out for:Symptom #1: ConstipationAfter 50, constipation worsens in men and women, says Charlene LePane, DO, a gastroenterologist with Florida Hospital. Changes in diet, less exercise, medications, certain diseases, or bed rest after an accident or illness are typical culprits.Over-the-counter remedies may work for occasional constipation. However, frequent constipation could signal a tumor in the lower bowel that’s blocking waste from exiting the body.Any change in bowel habits (constipation or diarrhea) that lasts two weeks or more should be evaluated. Both can signal colorectal cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Also, pay attention to: bloody or narrow stools, unexplained weight loss or fatigue, cramping and bloating.“Colorectal cancer symptoms often don’t appear until the cancer is well-advanced, and sometimes that can be too late,” says Dr. LePane. So see a doctor right away if you have any of the above.Symptom #2: Shortness of BreathShortness of breath can mean a number of things. It can signal a heart attack or congestive heart failure. Or, it could mean a lung disease such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma or pulmonary hypertension.“Many of these are caused by smoking,” says Jorge Guerrero, MD, a pulmonologist with the Florida Hospital Cancer Institute. “Secondhand smoke, chemical fumes, air pollution and dust can be factors as well.”Symptoms shouldn’t be ignored because all these conditions worsen over time, adds Dr. Guerrero. If caught early, treatments may prevent diseases from progressing.Symptom #3: Trouble UrinatingPain when urinating usually means a urinary tract infection for women. In men, it signals an enlarged prostate gland or prostate cancer.“Most men are going to have to deal with an enlarged prostate at some point in their lives,” says Stephen Dobkin, MD, a urologist with Florida Hospital.Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a non-cancerous enlargement of the prostate, may be caused by hormone changes in aging men.“Fifty percent of men in their 60s and as many as 90 percent in their 70s have it,” says Dr. Dobkin.But painful urination can be a sign of a more serious problem: prostate cancer, which affects one in six men, according to the Prostate Cancer Foundation.His risk increases if he’s over 50, overweight, doesn’t exercise, is African-American, or has one or more first-degree relatives (father, brother, son) with a history of the disease.Early stages of prostate cancer often have no symptoms, so routine screening for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is important. Trouble urinating, weak urine stream, blood in urine or semen, pelvic pain or discomfort, and frequent urinary tract infections are all symptoms of prostate cancer and BPH.Symptom #4: Heavy Ache that Disappears QuicklyIs it indigestion or a heart attack? “Even if it’s short in duration, it can be a sign of something serious,” says Linus Wodi, MD, a cardiologist at Florida Hospital.A blood clot may have lodged in a narrowed section of a coronary artery, completely cutting off the flow of blood to one section of the heart. If you experience chest pain, shortness of breath, severe lightheadedness or sudden pain in the shoulders or arms, call 9-1-1!About 50 percent of deaths from heart attacks occur within three hours of the first symptoms. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in men.Symptom #5: Daytime SleepinessFalling asleep during the day — at the movies or in front of the TV — can be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea, where the airway narrows or is blocked during sleep, cutting off breathing and disrupting slumber five to 30 times an hour.“We all have a night here and there when we don’t sleep well. But if the fatigue doesn’t go away, obstructive sleep apnea can cause an increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, stroke and diabetes,” says J. Scott Magnuson, MD, an otolaryngologist with Florida Hospital. And it can increase the risk of arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats, and even heart failure.Common in overweight men and heavy snorers, the condition can be treated with breathing devices such as a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure), an apparatus that you wear at night to keep airways open and TransOral Robotic Surgery (TORS), a minimally invasive procedure where surgeons remove obstructive tissue at the base of the tongue.Symptom #6: A Pain in the SideAny pain between the ribs and your hips could be a symptom of appendicitis, pancreatitis or an inflamed gallbladder. In all three cases, the cause is the same: Something has blocked up the organ in question, resulting in a potentially fatal infection.If the pain is in your lower-right abdomen and your white-blood-cell count is up, says Juan Omaña, MD, a general surgeon at Florida Hospital, it’s probably appendicitis. Pain in the upper abdomen with high white blood cells usually means an inflamed gallbladder.And if it hurts below your breastbone and certain enzymes in the blood are elevated, then pancreatitis is most likely the culprit. The pancreas stays, but a gallstone may be blocking things up. If so, the stone and the gallbladder may have to come out. These symptoms are true for women as well. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate From Florida Hospital Apopkacenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSFlorida Hospital – ApopkaMen’s Health Previous articleA Father’s Day reminder from science: Your kids aren’t really growing up quicklyNext articleTo avoid humans, more wildlife now work the night shift Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Oxford firsts

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Advertisement Oxford firsts  30 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Oxford University’s innovation in fundraising is emphasised in its current newsletter to alumni. Michael Smithson, Director of the Oxford University Development Officer writes: “Oxford was the first university in the UK to establish a properly structured Development Office; it was the first UK university to open a permanent Development office in the United States; and in 1995 it was the first UK university to complete a major capital campaign.” Howard Lake | 20 November 2000 | News read more

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Rapid drop in Direct Debit donation cancellations, says Rapidata Tracking Report

first_img“History will show that UK fundraising weathered the storm of this last recession rather well and that this will have been done best by those who concentrated on regular giving.“In January 2009, with the full roar of the recession ringing in our ears, 5.63% of Direct Debits were cancelled. By December 2013, cancellation rates were down to a remarkable 2.40%. The difference may only be a few percentage points but for charities as a whole those few points mean millions of pounds.”Cancellation cycleRapidata has found that, over the last 10 years, cancellations tend to occur during the summer months and after Christmas, as people cut back for the additional expense often associated with these holiday seasons.However, this typical cancellation cycle broke down during the peak period of the recession and fluctuated with the impact of major events. But the figure had started to return to a similar pattern in 2012.The report is being launched today at the IoF National Convention 2014 on stand 42 . About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 7 July 2014 | News Rapid drop in Direct Debit donation cancellations, says Rapidata Tracking Report Fewer donors are cancelling their Direct Debit regular gifts to charity than at any time since 2006, before the global recession occurred.Rapidata Services Plc has announced a dramatic fall in the past year to the lowest annual average rate of charity Direct Debit cancellations since 2006.The company’s research is based on more than 500,000 monthly Direct Debit transactions. Indeed, Rapidata’s Tracking report has been analysing Direct Debit cancellations over the past ten years.Direct Debit cancellations down to 2.4%According to Rapidata, during 2013, cancellations fell from 4.05% in January to close at 2.4% in December. The average cancellation rate of 3.1% for the year was the lowest level since 2006, and lower than that of 2012 (3.56%).Rapidata supporter servicesPre-recession giving highsThe Rapidata report shows not just the impact of the recession on cancellation rates, but also indicates how key national events can impact donor behaviour. The London Olympics and Paralympics of 2014, and the wedding of Prince William to Kate Middleton both seemed to produce a positive attitude that resulted in markedly fewer cancellations during those months.Mark Astarita,Director of Fundraising at the British Red Cross and Chair of the Institute of Fundraising, added: Advertisementcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  39 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: direct debit Rapidata Services plc regular giving Research / statisticslast_img read more

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Housing Survey Shows Purchase Pessimism at All-Time High

first_img 2021-05-07 Christina Hughes Babb Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago A serious dearth of inventory is making the prospect of home shopping and homebuying too daunting for a majority of Americans today, according to Fannie Mae’s National Housing Survey. In fact, consumers’ pessimism toward homebuying conditions in April set a survey record.”The Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment Index decreased in April by 2.7 points to 79.0. Four of the HPSI’s six components decreased month over month, most notably the component related to homebuying conditions, which turned net negative for the first time in the survey’s history,” according to a press release from Fannie Mae.Consumers continued to show optimism when it comes to selling a home, a component that continued its significant rise from this time one year ago. Home-selling sentiment has nearly returned to its pre-pandemic peak, rising 16.0 points year-over-year.”April’s HPSI reading appears to have been acutely impacted by the ongoing lack of housing supply despite improving economic conditions,” said Doug Duncan, SVP and Chief Economist. “Consumer sentiment toward buying homes reached the lowest level in our survey’s ten-year history; unsurprisingly, respondents overwhelmingly cited the lack of supply and high home prices as primary reasons for their pessimism. The decrease in homebuying sentiment likely indicates that some consumers, potentially flush with savings—perhaps boosted in part by stimulus payments—may be attempting, but failing, to buy a home due to heightened competition for relatively few listed homes. Notably, consumers in the household income range of $50,000 to $100,000, a range inclusive of the Census Bureau’s reported median household income level, showed a particularly large decrease in overall housing sentiment, and we know that the housing market serving the affordable segment has been particularly competitive.”Duncan continued, “Conversely, consumer positivity regarding home-selling conditions nearly matched its all-time high, demonstrating a large divergence in perceived conditions between sellers and buyers, as measured by the gap between the two components. As has become standard discourse in the housing industry recently, increasing the supply of homes for sale would certainly help bring balance to this strong seller’s market, but unfortunately, the most recent data doesn’t suggest that inventory is likely to improve in the near future.”The full report is available at FannieMae.com.  Share Save Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago 23 days ago 3,128 Views  Print This Post Previous: Mortgage Delinquency Rate Declines at Unprecedented Pace Next: The Week Ahead: SFR Market Takes Center Stage Subscribe Housing Survey Shows Purchase Pessimism at All-Time High About Author: Christina Hughes Babb Related Articles Home / Daily Dose / Housing Survey Shows Purchase Pessimism at All-Time High Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agolast_img read more

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International news: world must equip women

first_imgInternational news: world must equip womenOn 13 Jun 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. • Minister for Women Margaret Jay told a United Nations special session on gender equality in New York last week that world leaders must improve women’s choices and opportunities in education and training. “We must equip women to play a full and equal part in the 21st century economy by lifelong learning programmes which include the new technologies and the new skills.” At the conference, the minister launched a report of the UK’s work done to improve women’s lives worldwide through its development work. www.undp.org/gender/Good relations with manager keep staff in jobs• A Gallup survey carried out in the US confirms that employees tend to stay in jobs where they are supervised by empathetic bosses. According the poll, employees’ length of tenure is determined by the nature of their relationships with their bosses. Charles O’Reilly, a visiting professor at Harvard Business School, told the New York Times, “It’s taken a tight labour market for employers to think through the social contract they are striking with people. When job opportunities are plentiful, people with crummy bosses leave.”www.shrm.org/ebulletin/issuesAnti-bias moves welcomed – with provisos• The European Union’s economic and social committee said it “broadly welcomes” the European Commission’s package of anti-discrimination measures but has set out six areas for change. It says that in the framework directive on equal treatment in employment and occupation that employers should be liable for harassment only in situations which are clearly under the employer’s control and where the employer knows about the harassment and has allowed the harassment to continue. And it suggests that more effort should be given to researching and developing the benefits which equality of opportunity can bring to business. www.eiro.eurofound.ielast_img read more

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Anything you can do

first_imgAnything you can doOn 18 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. … a computer can do just as well – at least, if you believe thepredictions, it soon will, thanks to advances in artificial intelligence. Andit could have a profound and surprising impact on the role of HR. Jane LewisreportsAI – artificial intelligence as opposed to insemination – is suddenly backas a talking point. In fact, it probably has not loomed so large in the publicconsciousness since the days of Metal Mickey and K9. Even if you managed tobypass the recent children’s craze for robotic pets (including a particularlygruesome, “intelligent” giant scorpion as well as morerun-of-the-mill dogs and cats) you’re unlikely to escape the influence of thisautumn’s $90m blockbuster: Spielberg’s A.I: Artificial Intelligence. Best described as a kind of futurist’s Pinocchio, AI recounts the adventuresof a robot child that has been programmed to love. What he wants most, ofcourse, is to become a proper human child. Equally predictably, the baddies ofthe piece are also human – so paranoid about being usurped by more intelligent”mechas” or robots that their only mission is to destroy him. Preoccupations in fiction often reflect what is going on in real life, andAI is no exception. The tech market may be in the grips of the worst downturnit has ever seen but a substantial chunk of any spare capital still floatingaround is now being channelled in this direction. The industry is building onold foundations: the development of AI (aka “intelligent softwareagents”, “softbots” or “expert systems”) was once ahotbed of development talent, generally considered the next Big Thing in theindustry. But it got shoved on the back-burner following the sudden onslaughtof the communications revolution and the Internet. Now a new generation of systems is evolving and futurologists claim we willshortly witness a new wave of AI applications – this time heavily boosted bythe leap forward in communications technology. Intelligent systems will nolonger be standalone entities, so much as networked “agents”, capableof intelligently interacting with other agents and people. The momentum is such that even Japan, a nation currently ground down byeconomic misery, continues to lead the field in robot “pets”, capableof understanding simple verbal instructions, running households and monitoringsecurity. BT’s leading futurologist, Dr Ian Pearson thinks it likely that thesemobile “pets” will feature radio links to a smart computer elsewherein the house and that these devices will become common by about 2010. Systems are certainly getting cleverer in leaps and bounds. We areperiodically startled by their growing prowess in different fields – mostnotably, perhaps, in the ongoing battle of wits between Kasparov and IBM’schess wizard Deep Blue. Futurologists predict that computers will have matchedhuman intelligence by about 2015. But it is clear that in some fields they are already steaming ahead. Earlierthis summer, developers at Hewlett-Packard’s Bristol research centre surprisedeven themselves by creating a robot that outperformed six of the City’s beststock-market experts in a head-to-head joust. The most galling thing about the exercise is that they were not even reallytrying. According to Dave Cliff, who devised the experiment, the”bots” were programmed to be the simplest possible example of a robottrader, with the smallest amount of intelligence. He was highly sceptical abouttheir chances of coming out on top. “I never planned for them tooutperform humans,” he says. In fact, it is becoming obvious that computers are leading the waythroughout the money markets as a whole – both increasing the volume of tradeand the speed with which transactions are undertaken. We may be languishing ina bear market but figures show that the number of stocks and shares exchangedon Nasdaq one supposedly sluggish Friday afternoon this July exceeded the dailyrecord of the boom two years ago. In many ways this is down to a phenomenon of supply and demand thatenvironmental engineers call “induced traffic” – the more capacityyou build to ease congestion, the higher the overall rate of traffic becomes.And the faster computers become, the more they rule out the possibility ofeffective human competition. No human – not even a super-trader – can respondquickly enough in an environment in which heavily traded stocks such asMicrosoft and Intel routinely change value several times a second. But acomputer, programmed to follow certain rules on risk and price, can clean up. The human consequences of this are already apparent: once the programminghas been accomplished, the job is done. “A lot of what we’re doing is justwatching machines talk to other machines,” says one trader. Two othersspent the afternoon desultorily tossing a football back and forth. Back atNasdaq’s computer nerve centre, meanwhile, a solitary technician sat back andsupervised the movement of millions. If the outlook looks gloomy for City traders, the same is true across thespectrum of white-collar work as the next phase of AI – the automation of”mental” work – begins to kick in. Given that this is how 80 per centof us spend our gainful working hours, future prospects look interesting, tosay the least. We have already seen the impact that non-intelligent systems – typicallythose handling routine administrative tasks – has had on the workplace.”We can administrate faster and more effectively using electronic toolsthan we ever could using clerical intermediaries,” says BT’s Pearson. And the same is true of the entire product cycle. According to US think-tankthe World Future Society, the entire design and marketing cycle – idea,invention, innovation and imitation – in companies is continuing to shrinksteadily. As late as the 1940s, the product cycle stretched to 30-40 years.Today it seldom lasts 30-40 weeks. If automating routine tasks alone can achieve such widespread change on thecorporate landscape, imagine the impact that systems designed to mimic humanintelligence – in all its myriad forms – will have. The clear implication, saysPearson, is that large numbers of managerial and professional jobs are next inthe line of fire. And if your job is not actually eliminated completely, youcan bet that some of the “unique” skills and experience you bring toit will be. Who is likely to be affected first? According to the World Future Society,by 2005 expert systems incorporating robotics, machine vision, voicerecognition, speech synthesis and electronic data processing will be commonacross all industries, incorporating every sector from health services throughinsurance underwriting, law enforcement, travel, energy prospecting and whateveraspects of manufacturing and design that have not already been taken over byrobots. But the greatest change of all will come in the structure of futurecommercial institutions, which – thanks to AI – will bear very littleresemblance to their original forms, says Pearson. “We will move fromtraditional companies with management and workers, to virtual companies withcore management and project teams only.” Smart technology will ensure that these new-look, sparsely populatedcompanies will be lithe and highly adaptive – capable of being re-jigged anddisbanded at the drop of a hat to take advantage of the emerging market nichestheir super-sensitive expert systems have identified for them. The overalleffect will be to “generally disintermediate” the entire managementinfrastructure of a company” says Pearson. Some companies won’t be neededat all. It will be an environment in which the élite will thrive – often working forseveral companies at a time for high rewards. But the bulk of people will ineffect become commodity items, with a global supplier base. Nonetheless, the democratising aspect of systems means there will also beroom for some plodders – at least in the early days. Smart systems mean that asemi-educated clerk will be able to perform many of the functions previouslyreserved for professionals. And because budding entrepreneurs will not have toworry about all the administrative functions entailed in managing staff, itwill also be much easier to set up companies, says London Business Schoolresearch fellow, David Cannon. “AI means computers can learn very quicklyhow you are and how you operate, and adopt systems to match,” he says Almost certainly AI will also lead to enormous boosts in productivity. Infact, says Pearson, “It will go through the roof – so we will all be muchwealthier”. But the question hanging in the air, especially if you are anHR professional, is what on earth will happen to all those large numbers ofhumans who will no longer be needed to operate the productive side of theeconomy? More to the point, how do you decide which individuals and roles toretain, and which to consign to the scrapheap? Clearly in the first stages of the cycle, demand for engineers andtechnicians – as well as for computer-literate managers – is likely to growexponentially. But it is easy to predict a scenario in the not-too-distantfuture where even these “knowledge workers” in effect program them-selves into redundancy by creating electronic Frankensteins capable ofprogramming, regenerating and improving themselves indefinitely. In the long term, therefore, the only skills worth honing if you aredetermined to stay in the workplace (rather than sloping off to enjoy yourselfon the back of the predicted AI-inspired productivity boom) will be those leastcapable of being replicated by computer. “We’ll need a few ‘ideascreators’ and a few ‘assimilators’ to package their ideas into useful anddesirable products,” says Pearson airily. And it’s difficult to envisage ascenario in which expert human marketers will not be necessary – until, thatis, computers learn to experience and convey emotion. But the really irreplaceable jobs will be those majoring on intensely human,interpersonal attributes which involve caring and empathy. In the barren landscapeof a grey electro-world, these kind of skills will be like gold dust, saysPearson. And we will be prepared to pay a premium for them. “We will valuethe human as a human, not as a cog in the machine,” he says. Machines will liberate people to cope with much higher value transactions,aimed primarily at making life more pleasant. But we will pay through the nosefor such luxuries. According to one pundit, the time will come when dining in arestaurant, on food hand-cooked and served by humans, will be the ultimate inhigh living. Pearson believes that as technology gradually automates much of theintellectual side of work, people will find alternative channels for theirbrain power and competitive instincts. One prediction is that community activitywill become a much more important facet of life as people try to impose someorder on all those long, leisure-strewn hours. A possible result, he says, is that people may begin to form their sense ofidentity from their place and relationships in the community rather than fromtheir job – a process, one might argue, that is already well underway in thecelebrity industry. Taken to its logical conclusion, then, the shift into the AI era willclearly have a profound impact on almost every aspect of society and theeconomy – and on how our institutions are structured and run. Be prepared toturn current ideas about the status quo upside down. A good example Pearson cites is healthcare. At present the group at the topof the pecking order – both in terms of status and reward – are those who canboast the greatest expertise and experience, typically consultants andsurgeons. “But expert judgement and high precision accuracy willeventually become redundant skills, because they will lie firmly in the machinedomain”, he says. So who will be the new high earners? Those currently at the bottom of thepile – the nurses and carers whose intuitive actions and tender brow-moppingscannot be machine-replicated. From this perspective, as Pearson points out,”The current practice of sending nurses on degree courses is completelythe wrong direction to take.” The HR profession could be said to be equally short-sighted, as it tries toshed its role as hand-holding people in favour of areas such as generalstrategy and business management. But the ability to get the best out of peoplewill be huge in the new economy, says Cannon at London Business School. A highly symbolic change will be the way people interact with each other, hesays. “When people in this highly automated, virtual world actually meet,it will be something really big. That’s going to force greater pressure onpeople. “There will be a new kind of networking – not about informationswapping so much as “whether I can trust you or whether we have some kindof mutual benefit,” he adds. “The pressure on leadership will changeto emphasise areas like this ability to inspire trust.” Pearson is the first to admit that the new world order he outlines –particularly the elimination of all but a few people from most of the businesscycle – may seem difficult to get to grips with. But similarly strange thingshave happened before. As he points out, “If you’d told someone in the1920s that 80 per cent of the entire economy would be based on services by theend of the century, they would not have believed you.” So what sort of timescale are we looking at? The replacement of theinformation economy by the “care economy” will begin in earnestbetween 2015 and 2020, predicts Pearson – just at the point when AI broadlyapproaches the human equivalent. That should give you enough time to dust offthose lucrative tea-and-sympathy skills. Just make sure you don’t forget aspare clean hanky. last_img read more

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Labour and Tories woo workers, leaving the Lib Dems to buddy up to business

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Labour and Tories woo workers, leaving the Lib Dems to buddy up to businessBy Michael Millar on 10 Oct 2006 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. The hot air of the political conference season has gone, to be replaced by the cold winds of autumn. But what did the respective party get-togethers have to say on the future of the UK workplace?Perhaps the biggest lesson business could learn from Labour in Manchester was how not to conduct succession planning, with the Gordon Brown/pretty-much-anyone-on-the-front-bench leadership race that dominated proceedings.Education and skills secretary, Alan Johnson, said all GCSE coursework would be removed from maths, and that other subjects would be supervised. He also promised an apprenticeship to every “young qualified person” who wants one. Though it seems the minister has not heard about age discrimination.Pensions secretary, John Hutton, reminded everyone of the forthcoming pensions reforms. Meanwhile, industry secretary, Alistair Darling, listed all the new rights workers have gained under a Labour government, and promised more to come.Employers will welcome the focus on skills, but the debate rages on about the 600 or so pieces of business legislation enacted since Labour came to power.For the Tories, the word ‘family’ – at 23 mentions – was pipped at the post by ‘NHS’, in David Cameron’s keynote speech in Bournemouth. He also called for greater understanding of workers’ need to “disappear at a moment’s notice” to look after their children. Employers had better start limbering up now if they don’t want to pull a muscle implementing this ultra-flexible vision of the future.Shadow work and pensions secretary, Philip Hammond, said a Conservative future would mean “work tailored to the circumstances of the would-be workers, not workers squeezed into jobs that they don’t fit”.In his speech to the party’s Brighton conference, Lib Dem leader, Menzies Campbell, outlined the issues “that matter to people – public services, the environment, crime, taxation – a fairer and more peaceful world”. No mention of employment matters at all. Lib Dem education spokeswoman, Sarah Teather, called for A-levels to be scrapped in favour of a European-style system of diplomas recommended in the Tomlinson report. It was left to the party’s trade and industry spokesman, Edward Davey, to tackle deregulation, promising to repeal unnecessary legislation and ensure future laws are properly assessed and fit for purpose. It all sounds good, but will Ming ever be given the chance to be merciless on business red tape?last_img read more

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Council rejects pleas to keep Polish monument at Exchange Place

first_imgDespite pleas by by scores of Polish-Americans and others, the City Council approved an ordinance to move the Katyn Memorial in Jersey City. ×Despite pleas by by scores of Polish-Americans and others, the City Council approved an ordinance to move the Katyn Memorial in Jersey City. JERSEY CITY – Pleas by scores of Polish-Americans and others not to relocate a monument to thousands of Poles massacred by the Soviet Union during World War II fell largely on deaf ears at the June 13 council meeting as the City Council adopted an ordinance that would allow the statute to be relocated one block south to York Street.Protestors filled the council chambers waving Polish flags and bearing signs opposing the move. They raised questions about the cost and who would actually pay for the move, and whether there was a risk of damage to the statute.The Katyn Massacre monument has been located at its current site in the Exchange Place Plaza for 27 years. Because it depicts an extremely violent act as tribute to the 22,000 Polish who were killed in the Katyn Forest during World War II leaders of the SID decided it was inappropriate for a park that would include play areas for young kids.Councilmen Richard Boggiano and Michael Yun voted against moving the statue.When first proposed, Mayor Steven Fulop said the city would pay part of the cost to relocate the statue and the construction of a new park. But City Business Administrator Brian Platt said at the June 13 meeting that taxpayers would incur no cost in moving the statue or developing the new park, but would be responsible for maintain the York Street memorial park once the statue was relocated there.The Exchange Place Special Improvement District – which is supposed to pay for the construction of the new Exchange Place Park as well as the York Street memorial park – did not supply cost estimates or specific plans that several council members requested.Some protestors also pointed out that the statue is being moved to accommodate a new Exchange Place Park and several new luxury rental and hotel projects, not the general public.Also the city, the SID, and a committee associated with the statue were supposed to come up with a memo of understanding that would detail responsibilities of all parties involved. But not memo has yet been signed.last_img read more

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GUALARIO, JOSEPH THOMAS

first_imgA funeral mass was held Sept. 4 at Saints Peter & Paul Church, Hoboken, for Joseph Thomas Gualario, 65. He passed away Aug. 30 after a long illness, surrounded by his family. Joseph was a life-long Hoboken resident and will be sadly missed by his wife of 42 years, Grace Gualario, his daughters Lea DiVincent and her husband Stephen, Christina Gualario and her fiancé, Mark Mautone, and his three grandchildren, Sophia Hope, Stephen Arthur, and Christian Joseph. Also surviving are his brothers Anthony and his wife Diana, James and his wife Linda, Michael and his partner Lisa, and John, and his nieces and nephews, Michael, Tony, James, Lindsay, and Erica. He was employed with Wakefern Food Corporation (Elizabeth) for 32 years until his retirement in 2014. He enjoyed summers spent at the Jersey Shore, traveling to Florida to visit with his family and walking his dogs. Besides playing football in high school as a Hoboken Redwing, Joe loved watching professional and college football, especially when his favorite teams Michigan University and the New York Giants played. Services arranged by the Lawton-Turso Funeral Home, Hoboken.last_img read more

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