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Sugimoto-curated 79th floor at 432 Park quietly hits market

first_imgShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Email Address* Tags432 park avenueBillionaires RowHarry MackloweManhattan SalesNYC Luxury MarketResidential Real Estate Full Name* (Engel & Völkers Market Center, 432 Park)“Among the clouds, at one thousand feet, exists an inner floating garden,” reads the first line of the Engel & Völkers Mercedes Berk team’s off-market listing at 432 Park Avenue.The image seems out of place, borderline absurd, to pair with the rigidly square footprint and design of Harry Macklowe’s controversial supertall. But for the wealthy couple who bought the unfinished 79th floor for $59 million in 2016, that was the point.The pair spent years transforming it into a homage to Japanese workmanship and culture. Now they are looking for a buyer.The couple hired Hiroshi Sugimoto to build out the 8,000-square-foot box of raw space. Apparently sparing no expense, the acclaimed Japanese artist and architect imported specialty materials including weather-beaten stones from Kyoto, and old growth Canadian Hinoki Cypress wood.ADVERTISEMENTRead moreVince Viola’s $25.5M mansion sale breaks Brooklyn recordWho’s buying and selling Manhattan homes? Last month’s notable dealsSecret listings soarcenter_img Message* Share via Shortlink He flew in artisans skilled in traditional, high-specialized Japanese building techniques such as the application of a lime-based plaster called shikkui, which is applied to walls horizontally by multiple craftsmen in simultaneous coordination.“Everything has a meaning that’s in the apartment,” said Noel Berk, one of the listing agents. “It’s a piece of art to live in.”The wood flooring in the condo’s master bedroom is hand-carved, the kitchen cabinets are made from hand-hammered metal, and the apartment is compartmentalized by floating walls allowing for the movement of the pendulum-laden tower.Beyond materials and construction, Sugimoto designed the five-bedroom apartment to open into entertaining areas first, a traditional tearoom, then a large dining room, which includes a sushi bar that was manned by a chef Sugimoto personally selected for his clients, according to a profile by Architectural Record.The architect also custom-designed furniture for every room and installed his artwork and photographs through the space in a series of site-specific installations.But Berk said the apartment maintains a livable and comfortable atmosphere.“It’s big enough to have huge parties and quiet enough to find a corner and read a book,” she said.The intensive renovation finished in 2018 and now the owners, an American family who are “very serious collectors of contemporary Asian art,” are looking to sell the apartment because they’re moving too far away to keep it up, Berk said.The broker worked with the sellers when they initially bought the unit in 2016. Now she and her team are beginning to show the apartment to a select pool of high-end brokers and art-world figures. She doesn’t have an asking price.“We could not put a price on it,” said Berk, citing all the custom finishes and furnishings that would come with the sale. She also noted that Sugimoto hopes to have a relationship with a new owner.A full-floor unit three flights up is asking for $90 million.“The price will be determined by the person who walks in and says ‘This is my home and I want to live this way in New York City,’” Berk explained. “It’s for a unique buyer who’s looking for something very different.”There’s been an uptick in off-market transactions in recent years. Several notable sales were handled without public listings over the last several months, including billionaire Vincent Viola’s Brooklyn Heights mansion.Contact Erin Hudsonlast_img read more

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Statistical analysis of thermospheric gravity waves from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

first_imgData from the Fabry-Perot Interferometers at KEOPS (Sweden), Sodankylä (Finland), and Svalbard (Norway), have been analysed for gravity wave activity on all the clear nights from 2000 to 2006. A total of 249 nights were available from KEOPS, 133 from Sodankylä and 185 from the Svalbard FPI. A Lomb-Scargle analysis was performed on each of these nights to identify the periods of any wave activity during the night. Comparisons between many nights of data allow the general characteristics of the waves that are present in the high latitude upper thermosphere to be determined. Comparisons were made between the different parameters: the atomic oxygen intensities, the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and for each parameter the distribution of frequencies of the waves was determined. No dependence on the number of waves on geomagnetic activity levels, or position in the solar cycle, was found. All the FPIs have had different detectors at various times, producing different time resolutions of the data, so comparisons between the different years, and between data from different sites, showed how the time resolution determines which waves are observed. In addition to the cutoff due to the Nyquist frequency, poor resolution observations significantly reduce the number of short-period waves (5 h) detected. Comparisons between the number of gravity waves detected at KEOPS and Sodankylä over all the seasons showed a similar proportion of waves to the number of nights used for both sites, as expected since the two sites are at similar latitudes and therefore locations with respect to the auroral oval, confirming this as a likely source region. Svalbard showed fewer waves with short periods than KEOPS data for a season when both had the same time resolution data. This gives a clear indication of the direction of flow of the gravity waves, and corroborates that the source is the auroral oval. This is because the energy is dissipated through heating in each cycle of a wave, therefore, over a given distance, short period waves lose more energy than long and dissipate before they reach their target.last_img read more

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Russian Navy receives Project 11356 frigate Admiral Makarov

first_img Share this article Russian Navy receives third Project 11356 frigate ‘Admiral Makarov’ Russian shipbuilder Yantar delivered the third Project 11356 frigate ‘Admiral Makarov’ to the Russian Navy after a series of prolonged acceptance trials.The main reason for the delay were problems with the frigate-launched Shtil-1 surface to air missile system which had been unstable during operation, as explained by the Russian defense ministry.The most recent missile tests took place early November this year.Admiral Makarov, which was launched in September 2015 and started trials in October 2016, was handed over to the navy on December 25 and is to be commissioned into service on December 27.Project 11356 frigates are armed with Kalibr-NK cruise missiles and the Shtil-1 medium-range surface-to-air missile system.The frigates embark one Ка-28 or Ка-31 helicopter in hangar and feature the Russian-built Fregat-MAE-4k General detection and target designation radar designed for detection of air and surface targets and output of target designation data to firing units.They are designed for anti-ship and anti-submarine warfare and anti-aircraft actions both independently and as an escort ship. Measuring 124,8 meters in length, the frigates displace 3620 tonnes.The first two ships in the class, Admiral Grigorovich and Admiral Essen were commissioned on March 11 and June 7, 2016, respectively. December 26, 2017 Back to overview,Home naval-today Russian Navy receives third Project 11356 frigate ‘Admiral Makarov’ Authoritiescenter_img View post tag: Russian Navy View post tag: Project 11356 View post tag: Admiral Makarov View post tag: Yantarlast_img read more

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NEUROANESTHESIOLOGIST

first_imgFern [email protected] Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) PROFESSOR (CHS)(D01NN) or ASSOC PROFESSOR (CHS)(D02NN) or ASSTPROFESSOR (CHS)(D03NN) or CLINICAL PROFESSOR(D51NN) or CLINICALASSOC PROF(D52NN) or CLINICAL ASST PROF(D53NN) Ongoing/Renewable Salary: This position will be a dual appointment with UW Madison and UWMedical Foundation.Candidates for Associate Professor (CHS) or Professor (CHS) mustmeet criteria for appointment at rank per UW School of Medicine andPublic Health guidelines for appointment and promotion on the CHStrack.Candidates for Clinical Associate Professor or Clinical Professormust meet criteria for appointment at rank per UW School ofMedicine and Public Health guidelines for appointment to ClinicianTeacher Track. Principal Duties: Contact: Position Summary: Job Number: Department(s): Minimum Years and Type of Relevant Work Experience: Appointment Type, Duration: Additional Information: This is a position for a neuroanesthesiologist primarily to provideclinical anesthesia care with teaching opportunities to residentsand medical students. If appointed on the CHS track, duties willalso include education and research components.The School of Medicine and Public Health has a deep and profoundcommitment to diversity both as an end in itself but, also as avaluable means for eliminating health disparities. As such, westrongly encourage applications from candidates who foster andpromote the values of diversity and inclusion. 99063-AS Full or Part Time: 80% – 100% Wisconsin medical license or eligible for Wisconsin licensure.Board eligible or certified by the American Board ofAnesthesiology. Work Type: License or Certificate: Institutional Statement on Diversity:center_img Employment will require a criminal background check. It will alsorequire you and your references to answer questions regardingsexual violence and sexual harassment.The University of Wisconsin System will not reveal the identitiesof applicants who request confidentiality in writing, except thatthe identity of the successful candidate will be released. See Wis.Stat. sec. 19.36(7).The Annual Security and FireSafety Report contains current campus safety and disciplinarypolicies, crime statistics for the previous 3 calendar years, andon-campus student housing fire safety policies and fire statisticsfor the previous 3 calendar years. UW-Madison will provide a papercopy upon request; please contact the University of Wisconsin PoliceDepartment . Anticipated Begin Date: SEPTEMBER 01, 2019 Your application must be received through the jobs at UW portal tobe considered as a candidate. Apply at https://jobs.wisc.edu/.Search for Job ID: 99063-AS. Please apply online by clicking “”.You will be asked to upload a resume and cover letter.The deadline for assuring full consideration is July 15, 2019,however position will remain open and applications may beconsidered until the position is filled. Completion of Anesthesiology residency program and certified oreligible for certification by the American Board of Anesthesiology.Subspecialty training in neuroanesthesiology techniques andprocedures preferred. Instructions to Applicants: Job no: 99063-ASWork type: Faculty Full or Part Time, Faculty-Full Time,Faculty-Part TimeDepartment: SMPH/ANESTHESIOLOGY/ANESTHESIOLocation: MadisonCategories: Health Care, Medical, Social Services A530900-MEDICAL SCHOOL/ANESTHESIOLOGY/ANESTHESIO Degree and Area of Specialization: Official Title: Applications Open: Jun 7 2019 Central Daylight TimeApplications Close: Academic Staff-Renewable Diversity is a source of strength, creativity, and innovation forUW-Madison. We value the contributions of each person and respectthe profound ways their identity, culture, background, experience,status, abilities, and opinion enrich the university community. Wecommit ourselves to the pursuit of excellence in teaching,research, outreach, and diversity as inextricably linkedgoals.The University of Wisconsin-Madison fulfills its public mission bycreating a welcoming and inclusive community for people from everybackground – people who as students, faculty, and staff serveWisconsin and the world.For more information on diversity and inclusion on campus, pleasevisit: Diversity andInclusion NegotiableANNUAL (12 months) Duties for appointment to the Clinician Teacher (CT) track:Provision of clinical anesthetic care to surgical patients (i.e.working in the operating room, plus evening and weekend call ) inan anesthesia team model. Provision of clinical anesthetic carewill be primarily, but not exclusively, for neurological surgicalpatients. Teaching of residents and medical students in theoperating room, and occasional didactic sessions.Duties for appointment to CHS track: Major teachingresponsibilities for residents and medical students in theoperating room, and didactic sessions. Primary emphasis of teachingwill be in the neuroanesthesia patient care area. Provision ofclinical anesthetic care will be primarily, but not exclusively,for neurological surgical patients (i.e. working in the operatingroom, plus evening and weekend call) in an anesthesia team model orpersonally performed anesthesia. Opportunity for participation orto lead clinical research for interested and qualifiedcandidates.The successful applicant will participate in administrative andcommittee work to support the clinical and scholarly missions of UWHealth and the School of Medicine and Public Health. An essentialpart of these duties will be working in a collegial relationshipwith other faculty members. The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer. We promote excellence throughdiversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply.If you need to request an accommodation because of a disability,you can find information about how to make a request at thefollowing website: https://oed.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/ Employment Class: MD or DO, Anesthesiologylast_img read more

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News story: Minister attends UK’s largest interactive skills event to inspire next generation

first_imgThousands of young people came together today (Thursday 15 November) to try their hand at different skills and to hear career tips from top business leaders and young professionals at WorldSkills UK LIVE in Birmingham.Working with the Government’s Year of Engineering campaign, Facebook, Rolls Royce and Raspberry Pi created an exhibition space at the event for visitors to meet with real engineers and see the technological solutions which engineers have already developed for the challenges of the future.Apprenticeships and Skills Minister Anne Milton met with apprentices and trainees, employers and staff from schools and colleges across the country, as well as Skills Champions – former winners of WorldSkills competitions.She also met with Mayor of West Midlands Combined Authority Andy Street to discuss the recently announced West Midlands Skills Deal. This deal will boost digital and technical skills, job opportunities and productivity across the region – supporting more young people and adults into work as well as upskilling and retraining local people of all ages.Apprenticeships and Skills Minister Anne Milton said: WorldSkills UK LIVE is the UK’s largest skills, training and careers event. The event is built around the WorldSkills National Skill Competition Finals where scores of young apprentices and trainees battle it out in their skill to win medals and the chance to represent the UK in international competitions. It’s fantastic to be in Birmingham at WorldSkills UK Live! WorldSkills UK Live gives thousands of young people a chance to improve their skills and show off their amazing potential. The passion from all the organisers and those attending is palpable. The future of technical skills in our country is clearly in safe and very able hands!last_img read more

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Semitic Museum to offer touch tours

first_imgStepping expectantly into a museum gallery with a vast skylight overhead, the men and the Harvard student guide pause before a statue of an Assyrian king. Emily Axelsen ’23 is leading her first Touch Tour at the Harvard Semitic Museum, a beta-test of the new free program for adults with visual impairments.“We’re in a rectangular room with 12 resin slabs on the walls,” Axelsen begins to describe “From Stone to Silicone.” She explains that the slabs are precise copies of 3,000-year-old original stone carvings that once adorned the palace of King Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud, near modern-day Mosul in Iraq. Axelsen’s visitors may touch the panels, and handle several models and a 3D-printed replica of the Ashurnasirpal statue, rather than the original.She continues, “Each panel tells a story, and shows the roles of kings. The first one is called ‘Hunting Lions from a Chariot.’ Would you like to explore it first or would you like me to explain it first?”Howard Sumner, a retired medical device executive who started to lose his sight at age 62 and now describes his vision as “extremely blind,” asks for an explanation first. Sumner is among the 38 million Americans over age 40 who are blind, visually impaired, or have an age-related eye disease. He and his sighted friend Bill Cooney are both experienced museum visitors, and among the first to provide feedback on the tour.Axelsen is an experienced guide, having led New-York Historical Society groups for three summers, but she has never given tours for visually impaired people until now. Polly Hubbard, director of education for the Harvard Semitic Museum said, “Creating tours for visitors with vision loss benefits the growing population of elders and fits our mission to make the museums accessible to a widely diverse audience. Practicing these accommodations in one exhibit can help us get better at designing our next projects with this audience in mind.” To develop a tour “script” and strategies, Hubbard researched disability resources, sought guidance from other museums, and recruited beta testers through the Harvard Disability Office.Sumner appreciates that the tour lasts an hour, explaining that longer tours can be exhausting. Asked to recommend improvements to the Semitic Museum’s tour, he first compliments Axelson’s performance, then wonders if a fabric sample might be available, similar to the king’s robe, or a sound sample of the musicians depicted in the art.  Based on Sumner’s recommendations, Hubbard located an appropriate musical excerpt, but identifying an accurate fabric sample was a challenge. In all, Sumner is pleased with the tour so far, and says, “It’s a good time to be blind, compared to what it must have been like 50 years ago.”Harvard Semitic Museum Touch Tours will be offered to people with low vision during fall and spring semesters starting Feb. 9, 2020.last_img read more

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Liturgical seamstress celebrates 20 years of service at Basilica of the Sacred Heart

first_imgFor the last 20 years, Patti Schlarb has served as the liturgical seamstress for the Basilica of the Sacred Heart — a role that has not only brought her across campus, but across the globe as well.In her role as liturgical seamstress, Schlarb is responsible for handcrafting the vestments and other decor for the Basilica and all the chapels on campus. Not only does she make items for Notre Dame, she also covers the needs of the University of Portland and the Holy Cross Missions in Chile, Uganda, Kenya and Mexico.But her work does not stop there.“I also am sailing on the seven seas, because I’ve made albs for the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan [which] used to have a C.S.C. chaplain … I’m all over the world,” Schlarb said.Liturgical seamstress Patti Schlarb has been handcrafting religious vestments for the Basilica and campus chapels for the past 20 years.Before coming to work at Notre Dame, Schlarb ran her own tailoring business for 20 years.“It just so happened that one of my clients that I had at my tailoring business was Fr. [Peter] Rocca’s secretary, and Brother Dennis Meyers who used to be here asked her if she knew anybody that sewed. So, she gave him my name,” Schlarb said.After three job interviews, during which Schlarb said she “was scared to death,” she started working at the Basilica. After 20 years in the position, Schlarb estimated she has made up to 100 vestments and 5,000 albs, on top of numerous other projects.Currently, Schlarb is right in the middle of her “busy season,” — preparing for Easter celebrations.“It’s one of those things I just have to keep going on each project that I work on, and I do it kind of like in a piece by piece,” she said. “I get one vestment done, I get the altar cloth done and I check them off my list. So as my time goes on, it usually takes me about 12 weeks to get ready for Easter.”After finishing her work for Easter, she then moves on to preparations for Holy Cross priestly ordinations.“We have five that are going to be ordained this year, so I have five vestments to make for them, and they’re all custom-made for each one of them — and yes, they take them with them, and they take them all over the world, no matter where they’re at,” she said. “I find it’s kind of a privilege because I basically go along with them wherever they are. It’s a good feeling for the ministry to do that.”Schlarb said not many people think of all the work that occurs behind the scenes in preparation for the different celebrations.“It’s very busy, and I think that most people don’t realize that everything is made here at the Basilica,” she said. “They just think that they open up a catalog and they buy it and it just appears, but that’s not the way it is. Everything that I make here is very unique, and is designed for the Basilica … I do a lot of things that nobody knows that I do. And even when somebody needs a button sewed on, I do that, too.”Her favorite part of working at the Basilica, she said, is working with the seminarians.“Seeing them come in … they really don’t know what’s going on, and by the time they become priests, they have grown so much and accomplished so much and it’s almost like I’m a proud mama, because they are like my children,” Schlarb said. “Because I’ve seen them for the last 10 years of becoming a priest. It’s very gratifying for me.”Schlarb said one of the most memorable moments from her years working as the liturgical seamstress was when she was given the opportunity to make the vestments used for the inaugural Mass of Fr. John Jenkins as president of the University.“He allowed me to go in and help vest him, and he signed a program for me and took pictures,“ Schlarb said. “I felt very very blessed doing that.”Schlarb’s work has even been worn by recipients of the Laetare Medal.“Four years ago the President’s Office called me and wanted me to design a ribbon that they could put [the Laetare Medal] on so they could put it around the neck like they do the congressional medals … so I designed that, and it’s now a tradition that they use that every year for the Laetare medal,“ she said. ”And the first two that were given out was Vice President Biden and House Speaker Boehner. They both have one of my ribbons.”Schlarb said she feels blessed to have worked at the Basilica for 20 years.“I know my business very well. It’s a very gratifying job, I’m not the type of person that needs a pat on the back,” Schlarb said. “I know what I do, and I know the quality of work that I do, and just to be at Mass and to see my creations and how much everybody enjoys it — that’s my gratitude that I get back. … I love my job. You can tell that. I do. I love what I do, and there aren’t too many people that say that they love their job. I really do love it.”Tags: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, liturgical seamstress, Patti Schlarblast_img read more

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Wayne Brady Gets Ready to Enter the Land of Lola in Kinky Boots

first_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019 Kinky Boots Related Shows Shazam and bam! Wayne Brady is getting ready to join the Tony-winning musical Kinky Boots. Before starting rehearsals next week, Brady prepared himself by attending Michelle Obama’s bicep bootcamp stepping into Gregg Barnes’ fabulous costumes for the character of Lola. The multi-talented Brady’s first performance in the feel-good show is November 21. (Tony-winning Broadway.com vlogger Billy Porter will play his final performance the day before.) Everybody say yeah and welcome Brady back to Broadway! last_img read more

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Corn Maze

first_imgIn a southeast Georgia corn field, University of Georgia students helped to design a corn maze in honor of Mark Richt, UGA Bulldogs head football coach, using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. As part of a precision agriculture class taught on the UGA Tifton Campus, students are learning the benefits of this technology while preparing for future agricultural careers. George Vellidis, a UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences crop and soil sciences professor, gave his precision agriculture students the opportunity to experience GPS technology firsthand by having them develop a corn maze at Rutland Farms in Tifton, Georgia.“I’ve been teaching precision agriculture at the UGA Tifton Campus since 2003. We’ve been teaching GPS from day one because GPS is a critical part of precision agriculture. Everything we do with precision agriculture has coordinates, so we can collect our data through GPS,” Vellidis said. “It’s a great experience for the students to go out and help with the corn maze. They get to do a fun activity while learning how to use GPS.”Ryan Rutland, a UGA CAES alumnus, and his wife, Meredith, designed the corn maze. In its fifth year, this year’s maze was created in Richt’s likeness. Covering 6.1 acres, the maze is the biggest ever constructed at Rutland Farms and is the most publicized. In September, ESPN ran a story about the maze on espn.go.com. Ryan says this was probably the most difficult maze ever built at Rutland Farms and gives all credit to Vellidis and his students.“Dr. Vellidis has partnered with us since we started in 2011. His class helps us by taking a perimeter of the field where we’ve planted the corn, putting an image on paper, then they transfer that image into the GPS,” he said. “They help us trace the lines and mow everything. They pretty much help us with the maze from start to finish.”Students have been impressed by how easy the technology is to use and how beneficial it can be to farmers. “I’ve used it to go back after we’ve already installed moisture sensors earlier in the season and I’ve used it to find the sensors much later in the season,” said Sydni Barwick, Vellidis’ student and student worker in irrigation for UGA Cooperative Extension. “When, for example, a corn crop is 8 feet high, you can’t see across that field, so there’s no way to find the sensors without GPS. Using the (GPS) system is great for things like that because it has an accuracy of about 3 feet,” she said.As far as precision agriculture, GPS allows farmers and researchers to make maps of data collected from fields. “The maps are then used to make decisions about how to vary the amount of crop inputs applied to different areas of the field,” Vellidis said. Like most other technology, there is a chance that students can experience trouble with GPS. Vellidis prepares his students to face possible technical difficulties.“The main thing is for them to understand all the problems they’ll run into, to understand how the technology works, to understand how to solve the problems associated with GPS. For example, cables might be disconnected or the electronics might not be speaking to each other,” he said. “So, I just want to get them familiar with how everything works.”UGA student Randall Stratton used the GPS technology for the first time in Vellidis’ precision agriculture class.“I found the GPS lab very interesting because it showed us how to work the GPS equipment, first off, and then it was important to know the uses of this in case future jobs involved GPS like what we had in class,” Stratton said.For now, Vellidis’ class is basking in the recognition that comes from creating a one-of-a-kind maze. “It was interesting; you have pride there for sure,” said Evan Hill, a junior agriscience student in Vellidis’ class.(Tatyana Phelps is an intern on the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

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Op-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways

first_imgOp-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享San Diego Union Tribune:Now that President Donald Trump has enfeebled the Environmental Protection Agency, reversed climate regulations opposed by fossil fuel interests and announced U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord, it is right to examine whether his agenda on climate change really puts “America first,” which he so often proclaims is his overriding goal. In four critical areas, it does not.Our public health: The Trump agenda apparently disregards that the burning of fossil fuels spews volumes of gases and particulates into the air that are toxic to human health. Numerous studies show that the most severe effects include acute and chronic bronchitis, asthma attacks, lead and heavy metals poisoning, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, heart attacks and premature death, with those most vulnerable to these ills being the elderly and our children.Moreover, pollution from the burning of fossil fuels costs billions of dollars in health care costs that are “hidden” in that they are not reflected in the market price for these fuels. These “hidden” costs include lost work days, increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations, increased insurance premiums and the overall growth in our national health care costs. In a 2009 report requested by Congress, the National Academy of Sciences estimated that in 2005 alone these costs were more than $120 billion.Our economy: Although President Trump proclaims he will bring back jobs by cutting environmental regulations, the evidence shows that new clean-energy technologies and the industries formed around them create far more jobs than are lost in the transition from burning fossil fuels.According to a 2015 report by the Environmental Defense Fund, based upon Department of Energy data, clean energy jobs already outnumbered those in fossil fuel by more than 2.5 to 1 and were growing at a rate 12 times faster than the rest of the U.S. economy. In a 2017 report, the Department of Energy predicts that energy-efficient employment will grow at the rate of 9 percent in the next 12 months, faster than any other energy sector.Our national security: Trump’s agenda also ignores a stark warning from the Department of Defense contained in a 2015 report requested by Congress, “National Security Implications of Climate-Related Risks and a Changing Climate.”The report goes straight to the heart of the matter: “DoD recognizes the reality of climate change and the significant risk it poses to U.S. interests globally. The National Security Strategy, issued in February 2015, is clear that climate change is an urgent and growing threat to our national security, contributing to increased natural disasters, refugee flows, and conflicts over basic resources such as food and water. These impacts are already occurring, and the scope, scale, and intensity of these impacts are projected to increase over time.”Our global leadership: President Trump has announced that the U.S., the world’s largest polluter after China, will withdraw from the 2015 Paris climate accord, an international agreement, signed by the United States with 196 other countries, which commits the world community to a concerted effort in combating climate change. Our withdrawal would leave the U.S. isolated as one of a tiny handful of nations in the world that is not a member the pact.China, however, has signed the agreement and sees climate action as a way to fill the leadership vacuum left by the U.S., announcing plans to invest more than $360 billion in renewable energy by the end of this decade. Moreover, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, China is accelerating its foreign investments in renewable technologies and related equipment, a growing international market in which China may soon become the dominant player.Our announced withdrawal from the Paris agreement amounts to abdication of leadership in the global effort to combat climate change, at our cost and to China’s benefit.Let it therefore be said that President Trump’s agenda on climate change not only fails to put “America first” by ignoring the hard facts, it also puts in jeopardy our critical interests as a nation both at home and in the global arena.How Trump is failing to put America firstlast_img read more

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