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Pensioner 95 arrested on suspicion of murder after his carer dies of

Cllr Richard Watts, leader of Islington Council, said: “We are devastated to hear of the death of a carer in Islington.  Our thoughts are with her family and friends at this desperately sad time.” The scene in Islington, north London, thought to be where a carer was injured The carer was an employee of a care agency commissioned by Islington Council.Last year a 96-year-old World War Two veteran strangled his dementia-suffering wife to death with a dressing gown cord and laid her on a bed of lilies before confessing to the police.Jack Tindall, admitted killing his wife Ernestine, after she begged him to end her life when the couple thought they were going to be moved into separate care homes.Britain’s oldest killer is thought to be Bernard Heginbotham who stabbed to death wife Ida, 87, in an ‘act of love’ when he was 99 on April 1, 2004.The great grandfather could not face his partner of 67 years being moved to a fifth care home in three months and so slashed her throat in their bungalow in Preesall, Lancs.He was handed a 12-month community order after he admitted manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility.Heginbotham died in a care home aged 102 in February, 2007. A 95-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after his female carer died when she suffered head injuries in north London, Scotland Yard said.Police were called at approximately 7am on Thursday to a north London hospital where a 61-year-old woman was admitted suffering from head injuries.She died in hospital just before 11am on Friday. Her next of kin have been informed.A post-mortem examination is expected to take place at a later date.It is thought that her injuries were sustained at a residential address in Islington where she was working as a carer.The 95-year-old has been taken to hospital as a precaution due to a pre-existing condition where he will remain pending transfer to a location where his complex health and care needs can be managed. Reports have emerged that he was suffering from dementia.Police have bailed him while enquiries continue. Detectives from the CID based at the Central North Command Unit investigate.Officers are not seeking anymore else in connection with this investigation.  The scene in Islington, north London, thought to be where a carer was injuredCredit:Henry Vaughan/PA Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Hemerdon completes commissioning and commences full production rampup

first_imgSpecialty metals development company, Wolf Minerals Ltd, has announced the completion of commissioning of the processing plant at the Drakelands open pit mine, constructed at the company’s world class Hemerdon tungsten and tin project in Devon, southwest England. Construction of the processing plant started on-site in March 2014 and wet commissioning of the plant commenced in June 2015. The entire processing plant, and all the equipment within it, has now run successfully satisfying the requirements for handover to Wolf. As a result of this success, Wolf has taken full operational control of the plant from the project’s EPC contractor, GR Engineering Services.The inaugural shipment of tungsten concentrate has also been dispatched from Drakelands for delivery to a long term customer, marking the company’s first generation of revenue and operating cash flow. Wolf Managing Director, Russell Clark, commented: “The conclusion of commissioning activities represents another major milestone in the development of the project, and I congratulate the Wolf team, GR Engineering Services and their  sub-contractors, who have worked together to safely achieve this landmark. With the inaugural shipment, Wolf has now realised its ambition of becoming a tungsten producer and we expect to supply high quality concentrate to our customers for many years into the future.”Following completion of commissioning, the company has commenced the ‘ramp-up’ of the processing plant towards full production. Design throughput of the plant is expected to be achieved in early 2016. The Drakelands mine and processing plant are now operating on a seven days a week basis under a six month trial which will run through to February 2016. If the trial is successful, Wolf will apply to make the arrangement permanent. A permanent change would increase available operating time by more than 27% in comparison to the original permission for a 5½ day working week and provide the opportunity to produce additional volumes of tungsten and tin concentrates with no further capital expenditure It also provides the opportunity to lower operating costs, pushing the operation further down the  tungsten concentrate production cost curve as well as generate additional employment opportunities.last_img read more