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Political influence seen in prosecution of Chadian newspaper publisher

first_img News Reports Follow the news on Chad Organisation ChadAfrica Condemning abuses Judicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expression RSF_en October 24, 2017 – Updated on October 25, 2017 Political influence seen in prosecution of Chadian newspaper publisher to go further The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa December 1, 2020 Find out more Many historic publications threatened with closure in Chad Newscenter_img Juda Allahondoum, Crédit photo- Le Visionnaire November 27, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information After a week in police custody, Allahondoum was finally brought before an N’djamena prosecutor yesterday and was transferred to prison pending trial on a charge of “pretending to be a journalist.” His trial has been scheduled for 2 November.The charge appears to be completely spurious because Allahondoum has been a journalist for more than ten years in Chad. He is the publisher of Le Visionnaire, a newspaper he founded two years ago. Before that, he was the publisher of the newspaper L’Union and he worked for other print and radio outlets. He has a press card issued by the High Council for Communication, which regulates Chad’s media, and he heads the Chadian media owners union.“We condemn this judicial farce and call for the immediate release of this journalist, who just did his job by reporting a story with supporting documents,” said Cléa Kahn-Sriber, the head RSF’s Africa desk. “The absurd charges brought against him raise doubts about judicial independence in Chad.”Following his arrest on 17 October, Allahondoum was held by the judicial police for nearly a week, during which he was subjected to interrogations designed to make him reveal his sources for the 11 October story in Le Visionnaire, which clearly upset the government.The article developed a story first published in the Lettre du Continent, a Paris-based newsletter, about the use of aircraft owned by the Chadian airline Air Inter 1 to transport arms to Syria.According to Le Visionnaire’s article, the civil aviation minister, who is also the sister of Chad’s First Lady, suspended the airline’s licence on 2 August but then inexplicably rescinded her decision. After it was announced that the United States was freezing visas for Chadian citizens – a freeze that the article linked to the minister’s actions – the minister was fired and Air Inter 1’s directors were placed under investigation.The article was accompanied by profiles of Air Inter 1 CEO Tarsi Mathias, First Lady Hinda Deby Itno, Prime Minister Albert Pahimi Padacké, the CEO of ASkyAIr, President Zakaria Deby Itno’s son, and two ministers, including the First Lady’s sister.The president’s family is off-limits for Chad’s media and the few journalists who dare to violate the taboo are liable to be harassed. The publisher of the newspaper L’Eclairage, Nestor Déli Sainzoumi, was accused of defamation in July after publishing an article implicating the president’s brother, Daoussa Deby, in illegal sugar trafficking. Sainzoumi is still being tried. Chad is ranked 121st out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index. ChadAfrica Condemning abuses Judicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expression Chadian radio stations on strike in protest against violent raid Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns Chadian newspaper publisher Juda Allahondoum’s detention for the past week and the way the proceedings against him have been manipulated in an attempt to make him reveal his sources for a story about a Chadian airline’s alleged involvement in arms deliveries to Syria. Receive email alerts News October 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Culture minister urged to step in and get ban lifted on eight books

first_img ChinaAsia – Pacific Follow the news on China ChinaAsia – Pacific Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes RSF_en China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures April 27, 2021 Find out more January 25, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Culture minister urged to step in and get ban lifted on eight books Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Newscenter_img News Organisation March 12, 2021 Find out more to go further June 2, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders today called on Chinese culture minister Sun Jiazheng to intervene to get a newly-imposed ban lifted on eight books – some by journalists – about social developments in recent years in China. The books were banned last week by Wu Shulin, the deputy director of the General Administration of Press and Publications (GAPP).“The GAPP’s control over publications is very disturbing,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Aside from the censorship of these eight books, it is the freedom of expression of all Chinese journalists and intellectuals that is being violated.”The press freedom organisation added: “The government must lose no time in ensuring that the GAPP stops exercising authoritarian control over all books in China. As things stand, publishers have to get a licence from this department every time they want to bring out a new book.”The eight newly-banned books include Past Stories of Peking Opera Stars by Zhang Yihe, the memoirs of People’s Daily journalist Yuan Ying, The Press by Zhu Huaxiang (about the Chinese news media) and This is how it goes at SARS.com by Hu Fayun. They are on a list of books which, according to the Communist Party of China’s Propaganda Department, “overstepped the line” in 2006. They also include a book about the Maoist “Great Leap Forward” and one about an independent candidate for local elections.Several press reports quoted GAPP deputy director Wu as saying Yuan’s book divulged state secrets and that all the publishers should be severely punished.Zhang described the accusations against her as “anti-revolutionary” and voiced frustration at the fact that her last two books were also banned. She said she would take the issue to the courts. “Chinese intellectuals have been deprived of all rights to free speech,” Zhang said. “If we keep silent today, tomorrow they can do the same thing to other writers and eventually the entire intellectual community will be muzzled.”Hu said the bans were aimed at “twisting history by erasing people’s memories,” but called them ridiculous and said they would not prevent people from getting access to the books on the Internet. News China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prisonlast_img read more