0

Colorado Coal Industry Sees Sharpest Drop in 23 Years

first_imgColorado Coal Industry Sees Sharpest Drop in 23 Years FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Christopher Coats for SNL:Facing national and state pressure, coal mines in Colorado reported the lowest production in 23 years in 2015, with 18.7 million tons for the period. The state’s output marked an 18.5% drop from 2014 and a sharp drop from the almost 40 million tons it produced in 2004.According to data provided by the Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining and Safety, significant drops in production over 2014 were seen at a number of local mines, including Bowie Resource Partners LP’s Bowie No. 2 mine, where production fell from 2.4 million tons in 2014 to 1.6 million tons in the last year.Peabody Energy Corp.’s Foidel Creek mine fell even further, dropping about 2.5 million tons from 2014 to end the year with 4.1 million tons. The mine, also known as the Twentymile mine, once stood as the most productive mine in the basin, but it has seen output steadily decline in recent years.Arch Coal Inc.’s West Elk mine also saw a year-over-year drop of about a million tons, ending 2015 with 5.2 million tons in production.The state’s continued slide came despite no mine closures during the year, though a few remain idled, including Elk Creek and New Elk.Full article ($): Coal production in Colorado tumbles to 23-year low in 2015last_img read more

0

A Father’s Choice: How Frank Havens Brought Home the Gold

first_imgIn 1924, canoeist Bill Havens had a choice: compete in the Olympics or witness the birth of his child. Bill chose the latter, and 28 years later, that child, Frank Havens, brought the gold medal home from the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki. Today, the Havens family is still on the water, including the now 92-year-old Olympic medalist Frank.Georgetown, Maryland. 1924. Brothers Bill and Bud Havens, former Mid-Atlantic wrestling champions, are standing at the threshold of a very different athletic benchmark: becoming the first canoeists to represent the United States in Paris at the Summer Olympics.It’s the first year canoe sprint has ever been an event at the Olympics. Bill, 27, and Bud, 21, compete against 20 other paddlers in the Olympic Trials to earn their place on a four-man canoe crew. For months, the brothers train day and night on the Potomac River with the Washington Canoe Club, preparing their physical and mental fortitude for the games. Bill, undefeated in both the one-man single and double blade events, has high hopes of bringing home the gold.But just weeks before the team is set to sail for Paris, Bill is forced to face reality—his expecting wife is due sometime in late July, the exact time at which Bill will be competing on the other side of the globe. The decision, though not easy, is obvious. Bill forfeits his spot on the team, and just four days after the games (at which Bud Havens and the rest of the U.S. canoe crew win three gold, one silver, and two bronze over six events), his son Frank came into the world.Bill never made it to the Olympics, though he continued to compete with his brother close to home. However, his sons Bill “Junior” and Frank, did. After serving in the Army Air Corps during World War II, the second generation of brothers qualified for the 1948 Olympics in London. Junior, largely considered the better paddler of the two, placed fifth in the solo 1,000-meter canoe race. Frank, surprising even himself, came home with a silver medal in the solo 10,000-meter event.Image courtesy of the Havens family.Buoyed by their 1948 Olympic success, the brothers moved in together in Vienna, Va., to train for the 1952 games. Their coach was none other than their father Bill. Junior and Frank spent the better part of the ensuing four years on the water, training to compete together as a tandem canoe team.“Even in practice they were beating the world record,” says Dodge Havens, one of Junior’s three sons. “It was pretty much guaranteed they were going to get a gold.”But Olympic disappointment struck again during the winter of 1951. Junior, who worked as a schoolteacher off the water, was helping a colleague move a car that had been buried by snow when he lacerated the tendons in one of his hands. In a matter of minutes, his chance for Olympic glory was gone.Frank, as his Uncle Bud had done 28 years prior, departed for the 1952 games in Helsinki without his brother Junior. With a time of 57:41, Frank set the new world record and took home the gold in the solo 10,000-meter event. In a telegraph addressed to his father after the games, Frank said, “Dear Dad, thanks for waiting around for me to get born in 1924. I’m coming home with the gold medal you should have won. Your loving son, Frank.”“Dear Dad, thanks for waiting around for me to get born in 1924. I’m coming home with the gold medal you should have won. Your loving son, Frank.”Frank competed in the Olympic masters division in 1956 in Melbourne and 1960 in Rome, but he never podiumed again. To date, Frank is the only American canoeist to win gold in a solo single blade event. Like their father and uncle, Frank and Junior continued to compete well into their 60s. The brothers, who preferred to race as a tandem team, regularly crushed the competition on both the national and international stages.“He was never bitter about it,” Dodge says about his father’s unfortunate mishap before the ’52 Olympics. “He was very proud of his younger brother’s success. They loved to race together in tandem events. They were pretty much unbeatable. Even when they were in their 60s and 70s, they’d high kneel [the traditional stance for canoeing] and beat everybody’s butts, even the 25-year-olds.”Between 1936 and 1953, Junior won 19 National Canoe Tilting Championships. Frank went on to be a six-time National Paddling Single Blade Champion. In 1985, at the age of 61, he competed in seven different events at the World Masters Games in Toronto and won every single one. In 1995, Frank was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame, a testament to his storied past and countless accomplishments.Frank (second from left) and brother Junior (second from right) practice for the Olympics. / Image courtesy of the Havens family.Frank, now age 92, is still on the water nearly every day. Though he last competed in his late ’80s with his son Dan, he’s proud to see that the spirit of the river has been passed down from generation to generation. Dan, age 65, and his son Sean have continued the tradition of training with the Washington Canoe Club. They both compete in the growing East Coast outrigger racing scene and regularly place in the top three.Junior’s sons Dodge, Keith, and Kirk are also accomplished paddlers and hold multiple Whitewater Open Canoe Downriver National Championships. All three competed in the Olympic Trials for the 1980 and 1984 Olympics, but didn’t make the cut. Keith’s sons Zane and Zaak also join their father and uncles among the nation’s top canoeists and have been competing and winning National Championships since the age of 10. Zane has been serving off and on for the past year as a crewmember aboard the Hōkūle‘a, a Polynesian voyaging canoe that has been circumnavigating the world.“I don’t know whether it’s in our blood or in the culture,” says Dodge, but according to Frank, being a Havens family member is synonymous with being a canoeist. You can’t be one without the other.Frank Havens, pictured in front of his “Bachelor Camp” along the banks of the Potomac, where he lived and trained. / Image courtesy of the Havens family.Q+A WITH FRANK HAVENSWhat’s your earliest memory of being on the water?FH: We were all brought up on the Potomac River. We had a camp on the river and my grandfather built this place. There was a huge room where we could congregate and have meals and stuff. I can’t remember when I couldn’t swim, so I guess somebody must have taught me early.What was your relationship like with your brother, Junior?As a young kid, Bill [Junior] being five years older, I used to follow him around like a puppy. He was the man. In high school he was Mr. Everything. He had such a reputation. He was phenomenal at everything he did. My aim at that time was to be as good as my brother Bill was. My brother was my main competition for a long time, especially in training. Early on, Junior was the best that was around. Having him out there to push me, I’m sure I got a lot better because he was around. I didn’t get to the point where I could whip him until we were both Olympic caliber.Frank, age 92, still gets on the water almost every day. / Image by Priscilla Knight for a story in Cooperative Living Magazine.How did you end up with the solo 10,000-meter as your signature event?My dad recognized early that Bill Junior used to push me hard in the 1,000-meter, but as I progressed, he recognized I had the capacity to do longer distances. I was always pretty good in staying with it and being able to get into a rhythm that would move the boat. I did better the longer the race was. It just came naturally.Do you remember what it was like when you arrived in London for the ’48 games?We went to London on a boat from New York and came in at Southampton. When we got there, the Germans had been bombing Britain all during the war, so Southampton still had burned out buildings there on the waterfront. London was still a mess. They put us [the athletes] in an evacuees’ camp. We were over there for six weeks. That’s where it all started. I started to come into my own a bit at those games.After the ’48 Olympics, you and your brother decide to train together for the ’52 games in Helsinki. What was that like?We moved in together, bought a house out in Vienna, and really hit it hard for four years. He was a schoolteacher in Arlington and I worked for an appraisal company. We would train early in the morning and after work, two workouts a day in the Olympic years. I can remember paddling the Potomac when it was pitch dark but we knew that river like the back of our hand so we never had any trouble with it. Our dad was our coach and he pushed you hard.When Junior injured his hand and had to give up his chance to go to the Olympics, you kept going. In what way did your brother still help you prepare for the games?We had planned to go to Helsinki as a tandem. We had trained tandem so long that I think I was able to increase my stroke rate which doesn’t sound like much but it takes some doing when you’re already paddling somewhere in the high 50s strokes-per-minute. To pick it up was something else.What is one thing you remember about your father and coach, Bill?High kneeling, it’s all about getting the blade in the water as far forward as you can and getting at it from your hip. It’s a rotation of your upper body from the butt up. My dad always said, “If you didn’t have such a big butt, you wouldn’t be as good as you are.”How did you feel going into the games? Nervous? Excited?I was always in Bill Junior’s shadow, like all my life. Up until ’48, I had never done anything that was “outstanding.” When I won the Olympic trials that year, that’s when everything changed for me. The girl I was really interested in decided I was finally a keeper. Everything seemed to start working out then.Walk me through the day of the race, from the start to the finish line.I was behind at first. I didn’t have a great start. In the finals there were a dozen competitors. I think I was probably in the first five out there. I remember passing the German, mainly because he made a grunt when I went by. And then all that was in front of me was the Czech and the Hungarian. I could see they were riding each other’s wake a little bit. Every time we’d come to a turn, they would come as close to the buoy as you can. Really they were kinda blocking me out on the turns, but I was still in the top three, so as long as I hung in there I knew I could possibly catch them if I had anything left. When we came to the final turn, they let a little gap out while they were changing positions. I put the bow of my boat right in that gap and gave it just about all I could. When we came out of that turn and headed into the last 1,500 meters I was probably a deck’s length ahead of them. I could see them in my peripheral vision. I knew they were right there. I think I only won by 12 seconds.Not only did you win that year but you also set a new world record. What did that accomplishment feel like?I was completely exhausted after this one. My teammate picked me up and handed me a flag and carried me around on his shoulders. It was quite an ending to a day. If it hadn’t been for a squeaky pully at the podium, I’d have cried, but when they were raising the flag, the damn pully was squeaking so it got my attention. That thing should have been lubricated.How soon were you back on the water after the ’52 Olympics?I had a day or two off, then I had to go back to work. I raced the Nationals in Philadelphia the next weekend.How has the sport of canoeing changed since you first started paddling?The single blade boat that I raced in at Helsinki, you never see any of those anymore in world competition. They have a boat now that is so narrow, I don’t know if I could get my knee in it. We paddled 17-footers that weighed about 47 pounds, something like that. Pushing [a canoe] for an hour on one knee, well, we did it so many times it was just routine. But the boat I raced in Helsinki would not be comparable to anything they race today.You and your brother continued to race for many decades after the Olympics. What were some of your favorite races?We raced the Canadian Masters for years and the World Masters. We really kicked butt in the World Masters after we were no longer Olympic-type paddlers. Of course, you’re paddling in age groups, so it got awful easy when you only had people within five years of your age to compete against. We went to Denmark and Sweden. We took a crew to Hong Kong, did an awful lot of paddling around the world. It was quite a life we had.Do you still paddle today?I hate to admit it, but I sit and do it now. I had a knee operation several years ago. I’m paddling a regular canoe. It’s a beast but I know I won’t have any problem staying in it. I’m not going today because it’s pretty damn cold, but I’m on the water most every day.last_img read more

0

FLU SERIES CDC: Flu vaccine reached those in need

first_imgFeb 11, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Influenza vaccine doses intended for those at highest risk for serious complications from the flu made it into the arms of the right people, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta said yesterday.One highlight of the first part of the 2004-05 flu season is that 57.3% of children between 6 and 23 months old were vaccinated from September to December 2004, the CDC said. The data were collected during the first 3 weeks of January by the national Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. This was the first year flu immunization was officially recommended for young children.”It is wonderful news that so many children are being vaccinated against a potentially life-threatening illness like influenza,” CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding said in a news release.The survey also showed that most flu vaccine doses went to the priority groups identified for this season. Coverage among adults in priority groups was 43.1%, compared with 8.3% for adults in other groups. Nearly 59% of people aged 65 and older reported having vaccinations by last December, down from 65.5% of people who reported getting flu shots in the 2003 survey.It has been a turbulent flu season from an administrative standpoint. States have scrambled to make up shortfalls in supply prompted by the loss of Chiron’s 48 million doses last October. Faced with just over half the expected supply, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) identified priority groups for vaccination.A CDC workgroup will meet later this month to consider whether to sub-prioritize those priority categories, weighing issues such as whether vaccinating children prevents more illnesses than reaching members of other priority groups, said Bonnie Hebert, a CDC spokeswoman.With the CDC’s release of its flu vaccine stockpile on Jan 27, some 3.5 million more doses of vaccine were made available. In addition, states were allowed to make widely available some doses originally reserved for certain uninsured or underinsured children in the Vaccines for Children Program.In California and other states, experts are encouraging parents to bring children under age 9 in for flu shots in order to boost immunity this season and next, said Robert Schechter, MD, with the immunization branch of California’s Department of Health Services. ACIP recommendations call for two doses the first year children get flu shots.Children can have their first shot now, before the existing supplies expire on June 30, and get another dose next fall, Schechter said, “to make it a little easier to get existing shots before next winter and use the supply we have now.”The push is part of a larger educational initiative evident across the United States.”People expect that vaccination against flu happens in October or November,” Schechter said. They need to realize “there is a larger window than that.”The Minnesota Department of Health today announced 24 possible or probable influenza outbreaks in schools and 12 confirmed outbreaks in nursing homes. The department offered this gentle reminder: “With 3 months of the flu season still ahead of us, getting the shot now is still a good idea.”The flu season is in full swing in Tennessee, reported Kelly Moore, MD, MPH, medical director for the state’s immunization program. Demand for flu shots varies by region, but is particularly high in areas where the flu is circulating, she said.Several schools have been shut down across Tennessee because of the jump in flu cases and the prevalence of other viral illnesses this year, Moore said. Some schools were seeing absentee rates of 15% to 20%, according to the Associated Press (AP). About 1,700 cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) were reported in the state last week, the AP reported.In updating its flu activity report today, the CDC said the illness continued to increase across the nation last week. Flu activity was widespread in 27 states, regional in 16, and local in 4 states and the District of Columbia. Two states and Puerto Rico logged only sporadic influenza activity.The proportion of patient visits to sentinel providers for ILI was above the national baseline, the CDC said. However, the proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and flu—7.8%—was below the epidemic threshold of 8.2%, the agency said. Six flu-associated deaths in children have been reported to CDC this season.See also: Feb 10 CDC news releasehttp://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/r050210.htmlast_img read more

0

Police: Man Threatens to Shoot Up Juno Beach Pier

first_imgPolice say a man threatened to shoot up the Juno Beach Pier when he was asked to leave last week.Juno Beach Police arrested 18-year-old Cory Matthew Clemens over the weekend and charged him with written threats to kill, do bodily injury, or conduct a mass shooting.Investigators say Clemons, who is a regular fisherman at the pier, refused to leave last Friday when an attendant told him it was closing time. According to witnesses, he told the attendant, “I’m not leaving, this is my life.”Clemons continued fishing but eventually left, after allegedly threatening to physically attack the attendant.Last Saturday, Clemons went out on the pier without paying the admission fee, police say. The next day, a fisherman showed the attendant a Snapchat post which threatened to shoot up the pier.According to the arrest report, Clemons admitted to police that he sent three threatening Snapchat messages to six people, with each post threatening to shoot up either the pier or the staff.He appeared in court on Wednesday morning.last_img read more

0

Syracuse volleyball takes down Siena, 3-0, in 2017 season opener

first_imgIn its first game of the season, Syracuse (1-0) beat Siena (0-1), 3-0, Friday at the Women’s Building.The match marked the first of the Syracuse Tournament, a two-day slate of games featuring the Orange, Siena, Colgate, Grand Canyon, and Niagara.Kendra Lukacs led the Orange with 11 kills, six of which came in an impressive third set. The sophomore’s 12.5 points paced Syracuse. Defensive specialist Belle Sand had a game-high 15 digs, while junior Annie Bozzo’s 17 assists were a team high.The Orange dominated the first set, taking a 16-6 lead before winning the stanza, 25-19. Siena raced out to an early 7-3 advantage in the second set before Syracuse responded, closing the set on a 22-9 run. Jalissa Trotter set the tone for the Orange, notching eight assists in the second set alone.Trotter finished the game with 11 assists, good for second on the team. Siena took a 4-1 lead to begin the third set, but the Saints’ advantage unraveled. Sparked by Amber Witherspoon’s three blocks and Bozzo’s nine assists during the set, Syracuse recovered with another game-changing run. The Orange outscored Siena 24-12 to end the set and finish the 3-0 win.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNext up for Syracuse is Grand Canyon Friday at 6 p.m. at the Women’s Building. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on August 25, 2017 at 12:31 pm Contact Eric: [email protected] | @esblack34last_img read more

0

Whicker: Kershaw, deGrom turn game 1 into a showdown of arms

first_imgClayton Kershaw ambled off to the dugout after 6 2/3 innings, bathed by cheers he didn’t need to hear, surrounded by Mets on the basepaths who were excited he was leaving.“It wasn’t like we stood up and cheered,” said New York manager Terry Collins. “But it’s nice to see him walk off the field with us in the lead.”The Mets led 1-0 on Daniel Murphy’s home run in the fourth inning, the one piece of meat in a riveting famine of a playoff game. At one point Kershaw and Jacob deGrom had struck out 12 of the first 21 hitters. Kershaw had 11 strikeouts in five innings. Mets batting coach Kevin Long was getting ribbed in the dugout at that point. “They were telling him it was a good plan, seeing if we could strike out enough to drive up his pitch count,” Collins said. And it worked as well as anything else. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “As I sit here right now, he might have gone a little too far,” Collins said.First, however, the Dodgers have to make sure there is a Game 4, and to do that they have to beat either Noah Syndegaard at Dodger Stadium tonight or Matt Harvey in New York on Tuesday night, neither of which will be simple.Mattingly’s rationale was to make sure Kershaw didn’t have to face Wright for the fourth time when it mattered. In the first inning, Wright treated the fans to several souvenirs, fouling off eight pitches, six with two strikes, and going through a 12-pitch at-bat that launched Kershaw on the road to bad pitch count numbers.“(Curtis) Granderson started out by putting a good move on the first pitch (and lining out),” Murphy said. “I was afraid that it would be something like an eight-pitch inning, but David went up there and battled, and it paid dividends later. Plus, he won the at-bat (with a walk).”The crucial seventh began with a walk to Lucas Duda. “Clayton was a little out of sync there,” Mattingly said. With one out, Kershaw faced shortstop Ruben Tejada, whose defense got him playing time over Wilmer Flores’ offense. Tejada had 38 walks this year. He fell behind Kershaw 0-and-2 and fouled off two pitches, then took four balls. That was the plate appearance that put the Dodgers in check, and deGrom, a former infielder at Stetson University, moved them closer to checkmate with an expert bunt that moved up the baserunners.“Then Granderson comes up with a great left-on-left walk,” Murphy said. Kershaw tightened his lips as he snatched the ball back from A.J. Ellis, following a 3-and-2 pitch, at 95 mph, that just missed. He has been through enough postseason pickles to know when things turn sour.But it was hard to lay anything on Kershaw when you saw how much horsepower was under deGrom’s hood. The first batter he faced was Carl Crawford, and he took care of him with five pitches at the following speeds: 97, 97, 97, 97 and 98.“He beat us with velocity a lot of times,” Mattingly said. “I thought we did a good job laying off the breaking balls that he wanted us to chase. But that meant he was able to get us out with high fastballs. He was good tonight, but we had some chances.’The Dodgers were 0 for 6 with men in scoring position in the first four innings. Then deGrom began mixing in some off-speed stuff (definition: 85 to 90 mph) and he retired 11 straight Dodgers and struck out the last three he faced.The question is whether Kershaw will hear any more cheers in 2015, and for what reasons.center_img • PHOTOS: deGrom, Mets beat DodgersThis time Dodgers manager Don Mattingly lifted Kershaw to bring in reliever Pedro Baez, after Kershaw had walked three Mets, and David Wright was due to hit with two out.This decision will be second-guessed, of course, but Mattingly had perfectly sensible reasons, since Kershaw had thrown 113 pitches. The problem was not generated by Mattingly, but by a front office that had this ailment in the bullpen last year and could not find the prescription for it. Here, Baez hulked his way in, threw high-velocity fastballs, fell behind and watched Wright, one of the best Mets ever, rip a two-run single to center that put New York up 3-0 in a game it would win 3-1.deGrom left, too, after seven innings and 121 pitches. Collins had toyed with the idea of bringing back the shaggy right-hander for Game 4. last_img read more