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Op-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways

first_imgOp-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享San Diego Union Tribune:Now that President Donald Trump has enfeebled the Environmental Protection Agency, reversed climate regulations opposed by fossil fuel interests and announced U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord, it is right to examine whether his agenda on climate change really puts “America first,” which he so often proclaims is his overriding goal. In four critical areas, it does not.Our public health: The Trump agenda apparently disregards that the burning of fossil fuels spews volumes of gases and particulates into the air that are toxic to human health. Numerous studies show that the most severe effects include acute and chronic bronchitis, asthma attacks, lead and heavy metals poisoning, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, heart attacks and premature death, with those most vulnerable to these ills being the elderly and our children.Moreover, pollution from the burning of fossil fuels costs billions of dollars in health care costs that are “hidden” in that they are not reflected in the market price for these fuels. These “hidden” costs include lost work days, increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations, increased insurance premiums and the overall growth in our national health care costs. In a 2009 report requested by Congress, the National Academy of Sciences estimated that in 2005 alone these costs were more than $120 billion.Our economy: Although President Trump proclaims he will bring back jobs by cutting environmental regulations, the evidence shows that new clean-energy technologies and the industries formed around them create far more jobs than are lost in the transition from burning fossil fuels.According to a 2015 report by the Environmental Defense Fund, based upon Department of Energy data, clean energy jobs already outnumbered those in fossil fuel by more than 2.5 to 1 and were growing at a rate 12 times faster than the rest of the U.S. economy. In a 2017 report, the Department of Energy predicts that energy-efficient employment will grow at the rate of 9 percent in the next 12 months, faster than any other energy sector.Our national security: Trump’s agenda also ignores a stark warning from the Department of Defense contained in a 2015 report requested by Congress, “National Security Implications of Climate-Related Risks and a Changing Climate.”The report goes straight to the heart of the matter: “DoD recognizes the reality of climate change and the significant risk it poses to U.S. interests globally. The National Security Strategy, issued in February 2015, is clear that climate change is an urgent and growing threat to our national security, contributing to increased natural disasters, refugee flows, and conflicts over basic resources such as food and water. These impacts are already occurring, and the scope, scale, and intensity of these impacts are projected to increase over time.”Our global leadership: President Trump has announced that the U.S., the world’s largest polluter after China, will withdraw from the 2015 Paris climate accord, an international agreement, signed by the United States with 196 other countries, which commits the world community to a concerted effort in combating climate change. Our withdrawal would leave the U.S. isolated as one of a tiny handful of nations in the world that is not a member the pact.China, however, has signed the agreement and sees climate action as a way to fill the leadership vacuum left by the U.S., announcing plans to invest more than $360 billion in renewable energy by the end of this decade. Moreover, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, China is accelerating its foreign investments in renewable technologies and related equipment, a growing international market in which China may soon become the dominant player.Our announced withdrawal from the Paris agreement amounts to abdication of leadership in the global effort to combat climate change, at our cost and to China’s benefit.Let it therefore be said that President Trump’s agenda on climate change not only fails to put “America first” by ignoring the hard facts, it also puts in jeopardy our critical interests as a nation both at home and in the global arena.How Trump is failing to put America firstlast_img read more

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4 reasons it’s not so great to be rich

first_img 34SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details When you think of money problems, you usually picture issues that arise because you don’t have enough of the green stuff. But have you ever thought about the issues that come from having too much cash? Here are four reasons Money.com says it’s not easy being rich…You find out who your friends are: When you have money, you may attract a different kind of “friend.” Hopefully you’ve surrounded yourself with “real” people who are true friends, but if the money disappears, you may quickly find out who was around simply for the benefits your money provided.Kids are lost: Money can be damaging to your children’s development. When kids grow up entitled, living in a “bubble”, they can really be detached from reality. Money can provide your children the opportunity to freely chase their dreams, but make sure their dream isn’t to sit by a pool and have everything given to them their whole life.Everyone wants a handout: Sometimes family and friends will try to take advantage of your wealth. Remember, you’re not a bank. Lending money will have an effect on your relationship, and you may never get that money back. But also, don’t be afraid to help someone achieve a dream if you feel they’ll work as hard with your money as you did to earn it.There’s a lot to worry about: As The Notorious B.I.G. song says, “It’s like the more money we come across, the more problems we see…” Problems can arise with friends, family, lawsuits, business partners, or the stock market. Some problems aren’t easily fixed by having money. I think we would all rather have too much cash than not enough of it, but it’s still something to think about.last_img read more

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FLU SERIES CDC: Flu vaccine reached those in need

first_imgFeb 11, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Influenza vaccine doses intended for those at highest risk for serious complications from the flu made it into the arms of the right people, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta said yesterday.One highlight of the first part of the 2004-05 flu season is that 57.3% of children between 6 and 23 months old were vaccinated from September to December 2004, the CDC said. The data were collected during the first 3 weeks of January by the national Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. This was the first year flu immunization was officially recommended for young children.”It is wonderful news that so many children are being vaccinated against a potentially life-threatening illness like influenza,” CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding said in a news release.The survey also showed that most flu vaccine doses went to the priority groups identified for this season. Coverage among adults in priority groups was 43.1%, compared with 8.3% for adults in other groups. Nearly 59% of people aged 65 and older reported having vaccinations by last December, down from 65.5% of people who reported getting flu shots in the 2003 survey.It has been a turbulent flu season from an administrative standpoint. States have scrambled to make up shortfalls in supply prompted by the loss of Chiron’s 48 million doses last October. Faced with just over half the expected supply, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) identified priority groups for vaccination.A CDC workgroup will meet later this month to consider whether to sub-prioritize those priority categories, weighing issues such as whether vaccinating children prevents more illnesses than reaching members of other priority groups, said Bonnie Hebert, a CDC spokeswoman.With the CDC’s release of its flu vaccine stockpile on Jan 27, some 3.5 million more doses of vaccine were made available. In addition, states were allowed to make widely available some doses originally reserved for certain uninsured or underinsured children in the Vaccines for Children Program.In California and other states, experts are encouraging parents to bring children under age 9 in for flu shots in order to boost immunity this season and next, said Robert Schechter, MD, with the immunization branch of California’s Department of Health Services. ACIP recommendations call for two doses the first year children get flu shots.Children can have their first shot now, before the existing supplies expire on June 30, and get another dose next fall, Schechter said, “to make it a little easier to get existing shots before next winter and use the supply we have now.”The push is part of a larger educational initiative evident across the United States.”People expect that vaccination against flu happens in October or November,” Schechter said. They need to realize “there is a larger window than that.”The Minnesota Department of Health today announced 24 possible or probable influenza outbreaks in schools and 12 confirmed outbreaks in nursing homes. The department offered this gentle reminder: “With 3 months of the flu season still ahead of us, getting the shot now is still a good idea.”The flu season is in full swing in Tennessee, reported Kelly Moore, MD, MPH, medical director for the state’s immunization program. Demand for flu shots varies by region, but is particularly high in areas where the flu is circulating, she said.Several schools have been shut down across Tennessee because of the jump in flu cases and the prevalence of other viral illnesses this year, Moore said. Some schools were seeing absentee rates of 15% to 20%, according to the Associated Press (AP). About 1,700 cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) were reported in the state last week, the AP reported.In updating its flu activity report today, the CDC said the illness continued to increase across the nation last week. Flu activity was widespread in 27 states, regional in 16, and local in 4 states and the District of Columbia. Two states and Puerto Rico logged only sporadic influenza activity.The proportion of patient visits to sentinel providers for ILI was above the national baseline, the CDC said. However, the proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and flu—7.8%—was below the epidemic threshold of 8.2%, the agency said. Six flu-associated deaths in children have been reported to CDC this season.See also: Feb 10 CDC news releasehttp://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/r050210.htmlast_img read more