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Adjunct Instructor – Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Systems

first_imgPosition Title: Adjunct Instructor – Remotely-PilotedAircraft SystemsSalary: Class/lecture – $53.96; Lab/practicum – $45.66Qualifications:Four years work experience with remotely-piloted aircraft systemsmaintenance and/or repair.Experience with training or classroom teaching preferred.Duties:The School of STEM Career at MVCC invites applications for AdjunctInstructors of Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Systems courses. Teachingfaculty at MVCC have the primary responsibility of fulfilling theCollege’s mission of providing high-quality educationalopportunities to meet the diverse needs of our students.Adjunct faculty members teach contracted classes in accordance withestablished policies, guidelines, and learning outcomes. Lecturesand labs may be taught in traditional classroom settings,virtually, or a combination. This position may include both daytimeand evening classes.Major Responsibilities: F acilitate classroom instruction;Teach assigned class in accordance with the learningobjectives;Develop and maintain syllabus materials;Evaluate student performance;Maintain grades, enter midterm and final grades;Respond promptly to student inquiries;Maintain attendance records according to MVCC standards;Integrate current and emerging instructional deliverytechnologies into the learning process;Maintain professional standards that protect studentconfidentiality;Communicate effectively, both orally and in writing usingdiscretion, patience, and courtesy. Special Instructions to Applicants:MVCC does not discriminate. MVCC is an affirmative action, equalopportunity employer. Women, minorities, veterans, and people withdisabilities are encouraged to apply. MVCC offers a comprehensiveemployee enrichment program. Official academic transcripts requiredupon hire.Review Start Date: 1/13/2020Review of applications will begin on the review start date andwill continue until successful candidates have beenidentified.last_img read more

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Corn Maze

first_imgIn a southeast Georgia corn field, University of Georgia students helped to design a corn maze in honor of Mark Richt, UGA Bulldogs head football coach, using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. As part of a precision agriculture class taught on the UGA Tifton Campus, students are learning the benefits of this technology while preparing for future agricultural careers. George Vellidis, a UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences crop and soil sciences professor, gave his precision agriculture students the opportunity to experience GPS technology firsthand by having them develop a corn maze at Rutland Farms in Tifton, Georgia.“I’ve been teaching precision agriculture at the UGA Tifton Campus since 2003. We’ve been teaching GPS from day one because GPS is a critical part of precision agriculture. Everything we do with precision agriculture has coordinates, so we can collect our data through GPS,” Vellidis said. “It’s a great experience for the students to go out and help with the corn maze. They get to do a fun activity while learning how to use GPS.”Ryan Rutland, a UGA CAES alumnus, and his wife, Meredith, designed the corn maze. In its fifth year, this year’s maze was created in Richt’s likeness. Covering 6.1 acres, the maze is the biggest ever constructed at Rutland Farms and is the most publicized. In September, ESPN ran a story about the maze on espn.go.com. Ryan says this was probably the most difficult maze ever built at Rutland Farms and gives all credit to Vellidis and his students.“Dr. Vellidis has partnered with us since we started in 2011. His class helps us by taking a perimeter of the field where we’ve planted the corn, putting an image on paper, then they transfer that image into the GPS,” he said. “They help us trace the lines and mow everything. They pretty much help us with the maze from start to finish.”Students have been impressed by how easy the technology is to use and how beneficial it can be to farmers. “I’ve used it to go back after we’ve already installed moisture sensors earlier in the season and I’ve used it to find the sensors much later in the season,” said Sydni Barwick, Vellidis’ student and student worker in irrigation for UGA Cooperative Extension. “When, for example, a corn crop is 8 feet high, you can’t see across that field, so there’s no way to find the sensors without GPS. Using the (GPS) system is great for things like that because it has an accuracy of about 3 feet,” she said.As far as precision agriculture, GPS allows farmers and researchers to make maps of data collected from fields. “The maps are then used to make decisions about how to vary the amount of crop inputs applied to different areas of the field,” Vellidis said. Like most other technology, there is a chance that students can experience trouble with GPS. Vellidis prepares his students to face possible technical difficulties.“The main thing is for them to understand all the problems they’ll run into, to understand how the technology works, to understand how to solve the problems associated with GPS. For example, cables might be disconnected or the electronics might not be speaking to each other,” he said. “So, I just want to get them familiar with how everything works.”UGA student Randall Stratton used the GPS technology for the first time in Vellidis’ precision agriculture class.“I found the GPS lab very interesting because it showed us how to work the GPS equipment, first off, and then it was important to know the uses of this in case future jobs involved GPS like what we had in class,” Stratton said.For now, Vellidis’ class is basking in the recognition that comes from creating a one-of-a-kind maze. “It was interesting; you have pride there for sure,” said Evan Hill, a junior agriscience student in Vellidis’ class.(Tatyana Phelps is an intern on the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

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ST CONALS COULD PLANT A NEW IDEA IN YOUR HEAD

first_imgThe St Conal’s garden crew with their pumpkinsWould you like the opportunity to grow your own vegetables, fruit, herbs and flowers? If so then the community gardens at St Conal’s Letterkenny is the place to become the modern day good-lifer!Since its inception in 2010 the garden has grown into a natural , sustainable and healthy community. The garden which holds over forty outdoor plots alongside four polytunnels, fruit picking orchards and an indoor gazebo is now accepting names from individuals for the 2014 growing season plot spaces. Alongside your plot space this year you will have the opportunity to get involved in tutored garden time and also some competitive growing!You can grow all sorts in the St Conal’s Garden!Community gardener Joanne Butler will be on hand one day a week to offer assistance and advice to all growers at St Conal’s.“Next year we will start a seed sharing & saving scheme along with a possible box scheme being launched at the garden ”One of the community groups involved in the garden this year is Cara House who are finishing up a very successful garden course there. Participants not only learned practical horticulture but also built a pallet garden, had a go at pumpkin carving, and made christmas pots which go on sale in a few weeks time .Chairperson of the gardens Ann Wilkilson said “increasing consumer interest in where our food comes from combined with concerns about air miles, GM foods and sustainability has led to a community garden renaissance here in which I firmly believe is growing by the year.”So if you would like to get growing with outdoor exercise and relaxation then come on and get involved in the community gardens at St Conal’s.Plot spaces are limited so call Ann on 0868591619 for more information .Busy at work potting some plants. ST CONALS COULD PLANT A NEW IDEA IN YOUR HEAD was last modified: November 18th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Joanne ButlerSt Conal’s Gardenlast_img read more