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Florida ‘stand your ground’ shooter Michael Drejka says ‘I followed the law’

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(CLEARWATER, Fla.) — Breaking his silence in a jailhouse interview, the white Florida man charged with manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man in a dispute over a parking space says “I cleared every hurdle” of the state’s “stand your ground” self-defense law.Michael Drejka spoke for the first time since being arrested and charged in the July killing of Marquis McGlockton, who was gunned down in front of his girlfriend and children.Drejka, 48, invoked the “stand your ground” law, saying that he was in fear of his life after McGlockton shoved him to the ground when he came out of a convenience store in Clearwater, Florida, to find Drejka allegedly berating his girlfriend, Britany Jacobs, about parking in a handicap space.“I followed the law the way I felt the law was supposed to be followed,” Drejka told ABC affiliate station WTSP-TV in Tampa Bay. “I cleared every hurdle that that law had put in front of me.”Asked if he could go back and change anything he did that fateful day, Drejka said, “No, [not] off the top of my head.”On July 19, Drejka spotted Jacobs sitting in her car parked in a handicap spot outside the Circle A convenience store in Clearwater waiting for McGlockton, the father of her three children, to come out.He said he confronted Jacobs because he has a “pet peeve” about seeing people illegally parked in spots reserved for the disabled.Drejka said he once had a childhood sweetheart who was disabled in a car crash when she was 16, and that his mother-in-law is disabled.“I always said, my whole life is always looking for a handicapped parking spot,” Drejka said in the interview conducted Friday at the Pinellas County Jail, where he is being held on $100,000 bail. “And it just always touched a nerve with me.”Investigators said Drejka, who is not disabled, was alone on the day of the shooting.He denied that the episode with Jacobs and McGlockton had anything to do with race, and said it was “totally false” that he used racial slurs in the encounter with Jacobs or anyone else.Drejka refuted allegations by attorneys for Jacobs and the McGlockton family that he is a racist.“No sir, not by any means,” he said. “I’ve worked with too many people, I’ve met too many people in my life to be that kind of person. There’s no way to survive really by being like that.”Surveillance video taken from in front of the Circle A store showed McGlockton, 28, getting between Drejka and Jacobs, and shoving Drejka to the ground. Drejka, who had a permit to carry a concealed weapon, is seen in the footage pulling a .40-caliber Glock handgun while he was still on the ground and firing it at McGlockton, who appeared to be retreating.The video shows McGlockton being shot once in the left side. Jacobs said she and McGlockton’s 5-year-old son witnessed the shooting.McGlockton stumbled back in the store mortally wounded and later died at a hospital.Drejka said he feared for his life when McGlockton “tackled” him to the ground.“There was only one way to look at that. You have to be scared … because if you’re not and you’re wrong you know … that’s that,” he said. “So, yeah very scared having never been confronted like that or never been assaulted like that if you will.”Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri initially declined to arrest Drejka after the gunman invoked the “stand your ground” defense, saying his decision was bound by the law.Drejka said he felt “vindicated” by Gualtieri’s decision, even as protests broke out in Clearwater and across the nation over the shooting.“I’m a strong supporter of Second Amendment rights and the fact that everybody deserves to feel secure in their person no matter where they go or what they’re doing as long as they’re there legally, of course,” he said. “So yeah, I guess you can say I’m a big supporter of the Second Amendment. I suppose not overtly outspoken about it, but in my heart.”When asked if he could say anything to McGlockton’s loved ones, he initially declined. But later in the interview, he said, “I’m sorry, that’s all I can really say to them.”“And thinking about it, would you accept those kinds of words from someone? I don’t think I would,” he said.He said he was surprised when Pinellas County State Attorney Bernie McCabe filed a manslaughter charge against him on Aug. 13. Drejka denied that he voluntarily turned himself in.“They lied to me,” he said of the detective who arrested him. “And under the guise of returning my property, he requested me to show up at the sheriff’s office to talk to the original detectives.”The only time in the interview that Drejka showed emotion was when he spoke of his wife and children, who he claims have been facing death threats and eviction from their rented home.“I miss my girl. I miss my girls. All of them, yeah,” he said crying.Attorneys for Jacobs and the McGlockton family could not be reached for comment on Sunday. They have previously praised McCabe for filing charges against Drejka while criticizing Sheriff Gualtieri for not arresting Drejka immediately.“I support the state attorney’s decision and will have no further comment as the case continues to work its way through the criminal justice system,” Gualtieri said in a statement after Drejka was charged with manslaughter.Jacobs’ attorney, Benjamin Crump, has called Drejka a “self-appointed wannabe cop” who attempted to “hide behind ‘stand your ground’ to defend his indefensible actions.”“I have full faith that this truth will prevail to punish this cold-blooded killer who angrily created the altercation that led to Markeis’ needless death,” Crump said the day Drejka was charged. “We will continue to fight until justice is brought for the family of Markeis McGlockton.”Drejka has plead not guilty to the charge and has a pre-trial hearing scheduled for Oct. 19.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Former St Hugh’s student completes row across Pacific

first_imgA St Hugh’s alumna has rowed across the Pacific from Japan to Alaska – and is thought to be the first person to complete the solo voyage.Sarah Outen, who read Biology, rowed 3,750 nautical miles in 150 days and arrived in Adak in the Aleutian Islands on Monday.She told Cherwell, “I am so happy to be safely ashore after some of the most amazing months of my life. And stoked that it all started in Oxford – that’s when I started to row. Thank you St Hugh’s/OUWBC!”The voyage was part of her London2London: Via the World expedition; she is attempting to row, kayak and cycle across two oceans, three continents and 14 countries in a continuous loop around the world. The expedition began on 1 April 2011 at London’s Tower Bridge and will see her row 7,500 nautical miles and cycle 16,000 miles in total.Bridget Fryer, outgoing President of Oxford University Women’s Boat Club, said, “It is great to hear of Sarah Outen’s achievement. We are extremely proud to have her as an alumni of the Oxford University Women’s Boat Club and I hope that her determination and courage is an inspiration to current and future oarswomen at Oxford University and throughout the UK.”After completing the North Pacific crossing Outen, 28, commented, “I have pushed myself to my absolute limits both physically and mentally to make land here in Alaska, and body and mind are now exhausted.”She added, “I am so grateful to everyone for supporting my return after Mawar ­– sponsors, family, friends at home and in Japan and my team. Without them I wouldn’t be here. I am solo only physically – there are in fact a lot of people on my boat with me!”Outen previously attempted the voyage in May 2012 but had to be rescued by the Japanese Coast Guard 25 days in after her boat was damaged by Typhoon Mawar. During her second attempt the rower capsized five times, narrowly avoided a collision with a cargo ship and was forced by high winds and bad weather to row to Alaska instead of Canada as planned. A spokesperson for St Hugh’s told Cherwell, “St Hugh’s is extremely proud of Sarah’s achievement. Not only has she successfully completed a demanding physical and mental challenge, she is also raising a significant amount of money for charity. We would also like to congratulate her on her recent engagement and wish her all the best for the future.”Outen proposed to her girlfriend Lucy via a satellite telephone whilst in the middle of the Pacific. She will move on to the next leg of the journey in 2014 when she will kayak through the Archipelago to mainland Alaska. Outen is expected to complete her London2London expedition in late 2015 and is hoping to raise over £100,000 for CoppaFeel!, the Motor Neurone Disease (MND) Association, The Jubilee Sailing Trust and WaterAid.A third year undergraduate at Exeter College said, “I will try and think of Sarah when I’m sweating on the Isis and be humbled. Big respect!”last_img read more

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Press release: £950 fine for Leicester man fishing with unlicensed rod and line

first_imgA 28-year old man from Burton Overy, Leicester has been successfully prosecuted after being found guilty of fishing with an unlicensed rod and line in May 2018.The case was brought to Wellingborough Magistrates Court by the Environment Agency on 12 November 2018 where Sam Kirk, of Scotland Lane, Burton Overy, was proved guilty in his absence and ordered to pay a total penalty of £957.The penalty includes a fine of £220 plus costs of £737 after Kirk was found in possession of an unlicensed fishing instrument, namely rod and line, with the intention of using it for fishing on 5 May 2018 at Beedles Lake, East Goscote, Leicester, contrary to Section 27(1)(b) of the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975.Following the verdict, Pete Haslock, Fisheries Enforcement Team Leader for the Environment Agency said: Anyone who suspects anglers of illegal fishing are urged to contact the Environment Agency’s 24/7 hotline on 0800 807060, or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111. We take all kinds of illegal fishing extremely seriously – whether it’s those fishing without a licence, or licensed anglers using illegal equipment. This case shows anglers how seriously the courts take these offences and we hope it will act as a deterrent to other anglers who flout the laws. Illegal fishing is not fair on other anglers who fish within the law, and it also endangers the future of the sport by damaging the sustainability of fish stocks. We regularly carry out enforcement operations to protect fish stocks and improve fisheries and urge anyone who has any information about any incidents of illegal fishing to report them to us so we can investigate.last_img read more

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With one year to go, experts warn of high-risk Tokyo Olympics amid pandemic

first_imgTopics : Although Tokyo on Thursday confirmed 224 new infections, a record high for a single day, Japan has largely avoided the disastrous effects seen in other countries.That has scientists and medical experts concerned about how things might look next summer, a year after the Tokyo Games were postponed.In interviews with a dozen infectious diseases experts, a common theme emerged: the Olympics would increase the risk of an outbreak.”Infection will flare up if we push ahead with the Olympics and hold them. There is no doubt about it,” said Daiichi Morii, a doctor at Osaka University Hospital’s infection control team. “The virus is barely under control as we are putting a halt on the inflow of people from overseas,” Morii added. “With events like the Olympics, the virus will come in for sure and the number of infections will shoot up inevitably.”Japan’s success in containing the virus is part of the reason. A recent government survey showed only 0.1% of Tokyo residents have coronavirus antibodies. That is much lower than 14% in the state of New York in April, and 7% in Stockholm.”Very few are infected in Japan and pretty much everyone is susceptible,” said Katsunori Yanagihara, professor in Nagasaki University’s school of tropical medicine and global health.Antibodies help fight off infections, and scientists say having antibodies for the coronavirus might provide protection against re-infection.There are more than 100 potential vaccines in development, but experts say none will likely be available in enough quantity in time for the Olympics, which involves about 200 countries.”Even if a vaccine has been developed by then, it’s near impossible for it to go around the world,” said Atsuo Hamada, a professor at Tokyo Medical University Hospital.A Tokyo voter survey by the Asahi Shimbun daily late last month showed that 59 percent of those polled believe the Olympics should be cancelled or postponed again, underscoring the public’s nagging worries about the pandemic.In a bid to address such concerns, Yoshiro Mori, head of the Tokyo Olympic organising committee, on Monday told the capital’s governor, Yuriko Koike, that he planned to set up a task force with the central and metropolitan governments by September.In the meeting, they discussed infection screening for foreign visitors and limiting crowd sizes, public broadcaster NHK reported.Japan has had only about 20,000 cases and 980 deaths. Researchers have cited various factors for those low numbers, from the nation’s robust healthcare system to infrequent hugging and handshaking. But they say there is no clear single reason for the country’s success.Norio Sugaya, a member of the World Health Organization’s influenza panel, said people in Japan should not feel secure just because of the relatively small scale of infections and deaths there so far.”Talks about how Japan has ridden out the first wave successfully. Talks about ‘Japan miracle’. Those make me very worried,” Sugaya said. “It’s terrifying if there are people out there who believe Japan is invincible.”center_img With just over a year to go until the Tokyo Olympics, medical experts say the event could pose a grave health risk to the Japanese public, predicting that few people will have coronavirus antibodies and that vaccines will not be widely available.Olympic organizers and the Japanese and Tokyo metropolitan governments are scrambling for steps to prevent the pandemic from derailing the event. But they say concrete plans are unlikely to shape up before the end of this year.The global death toll from COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the new coronavirus, reached half a million late last month, and cases topped 10 million.last_img read more

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Variability abounds in northwest Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest From corn and soybean fields well on their way, to field needing replanted after a washout rain, DuPont Pioneer’s Ryan Terry is seeing just about everything this time of year. He talks about the variability and what the wet weather in his area is stirring up in soybean fields in this week’s DuPont Pioneer Field Report.last_img

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Night Surveys: The Lights Are On, But Nobody is Home

first_imgReprogramming the controlsNot more than a couple of weeks after our Hendrie Hall Night Survey, Julie sent me a graph (see Image #6), saying, “After the survey, we met again with Tara Deming and our electrical supervisor Ed Grund [Hendrie Hall Facilities staff] to review lighting schedules in the public corridors and front foyer. We reprogrammed the Lutron system to better reflect building use – and have saved approximately 100 kWh/day (the equivalent of three Connecticut homes.) We are following up on a number of additional items.”When I asked Julie just what sort of return on investment there has been for her Night Survey, she said that Night surveys are a key component to building energy project portfolios that offer simple payback periods less than 5 years and significant cumulative long term savings. Opportunities found at night are among the lowest cost, highest value carbon abatement strategies.Julie concluded: “The Night Surveys work.”Sometimes it’s the simple stuff that works best, especially if someone is taking responsibility for building performance over time. Someone like Julie, just walking her Yale buildings at night. Infrared thermometer checksAs we walk Hendrie Hall, starting about 10 p.m., my students are snapping photos of spaces. One student is reinforcing Julie’s DIT shots with infrared camera shots.It becomes pretty clear that quite a bit of energy is being wasted. From the official Yale Energy Management Hendrie Hall report:General hallway and lobby lighting is higher than needed, especially in the evening hours. Operationally, lower level lights would be helpful to signify that the building is closing.Lutron system can be reprogrammed to set back public lighting.Replace row of PAR 38 Halogens in student lounge with LED type (see Images #2 and #3,below).Individual offices had sporadic computer screens left on and printers left on.AV systems left on in all larger spaces. Need to work with Yale AV staff to put into sleep / hibernate mode (see Images #4 and #5).Air handling units were operating during walk-through past scheduled operating hours. Investigate programming and space condition trending. Initial assumption is that air handling units are operating because of humidity setpoints.Band and glee rooms are used sporadically during the day and primarily in the evenings for rehearsal. Investigate appropriate schedule changes. This past October, as usual, my Yale Forestry and Environmental Studies graduate students joined Julie’s team to survey Hendrie Hall. Hendrie Hall, shared by the School of Music and just about all of the Yale performing ensembles, recently went through a two-year extensive renovation and addition, completed around the start of 2017. So this night survey was checking up on how the building is measuring up over the last nine months or so compared to energy performance predictions.“Tonight we’ll be focused on how we use this building,” Paquette says. “There are always ways to learn more about energy use and how we might adapt that use.” Julie places the night survey in context with a simple graphic (see Image 1 at the top of the page). Why Don’t Green Buildings Live Up to Hype on Energy Efficiency?Energy Modeling Isn’t Very AccurateHome Dashboards Help to Reduce Energy UseU.S. Towns Race for Conservation SupremacyStupid Energy-Saving Tipscenter_img Julie Paquette has been Director of Energy Management at Yale University for about 6 years. That means the buck stops at Julie’s desk for the energy consumption of over 400 buildings on campus. Yale has a pretty sophisticated approach to energy, including the Yale Facilities Energy Explorer, an energy dashboard system that shows energy consumption and details for every one of those 400 Yale buildings.But as a practicing engineer, Julie recognizes the benefits of less sophisticated approaches to understanding building energy consumption, including “night surveys.” Armed with just a digital infrared thermometer (DIT) and maybe a dozen pages of recent reports (energy consumption, building’s controls schedule, and even the custodial schedule), Julie walks her buildings with the members of the facility staff working in that particular building. They do this after the building is technically “closed” for the day. In the last four years, Julie has “night-surveyed” more than 35 Yale buildings, from labs to museums to classroom buildings. RELATED ARTICLES In addition to acting as GBA’s technical director, Peter Yost is the Vice President for Technical Services at BuildingGreen in Brattleboro, Vermont. He has been building, researching, teaching, writing, and consulting on high-performance homes for more than twenty years. An experienced trainer and consultant, he’s been recognized as NAHB Educator of the Year. Do you have a building science puzzle? Contact Pete here. You can also sign up for BuildingGreen’s email newsletter to get a free report on insulation, as well as regular posts from Peter.last_img read more

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Kanesatake community at odds with council

first_imgAPTN National NewsA public meeting was planned for Wednesday night in Kanesatake to discuss the current council.A referendum was held last month asking people whether they supported the grand chief or an opposition group of chiefs.That referendum didn’t seem to accomplish much.APTN’s Danielle Rochette has the story.last_img

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Two women rescued from canyon in La Jolla

first_img SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Two women had to be rescued from a La Jolla canyon amid Saturday’s storm, fire officials said. The two became stuck in Box Canyon, and firefighters and lifeguardsresponded to help around 3 p.m., according to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Facebook page.Slippery terrain and heavy river water flow made the rescues difficult, and one of the women slipped when she tried to exit the canyon on her own, then traveled about 30 feet in the water.“She ended up going down a waterfall and landing on the beach,” the Facebook post read. “Fortunately, she was not seriously hurt and did not have to be taken to the hospital.”The two were able to be brought up using a rope system. Both were evaluated by paramedics but did not have to be hospitalized. February 3, 2019 Posted: February 3, 2019 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Two women rescued from canyon in La Jolla Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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