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NEUROANESTHESIOLOGIST

first_imgFern [email protected] Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) PROFESSOR (CHS)(D01NN) or ASSOC PROFESSOR (CHS)(D02NN) or ASSTPROFESSOR (CHS)(D03NN) or CLINICAL PROFESSOR(D51NN) or CLINICALASSOC PROF(D52NN) or CLINICAL ASST PROF(D53NN) Ongoing/Renewable Salary: This position will be a dual appointment with UW Madison and UWMedical Foundation.Candidates for Associate Professor (CHS) or Professor (CHS) mustmeet criteria for appointment at rank per UW School of Medicine andPublic Health guidelines for appointment and promotion on the CHStrack.Candidates for Clinical Associate Professor or Clinical Professormust meet criteria for appointment at rank per UW School ofMedicine and Public Health guidelines for appointment to ClinicianTeacher Track. Principal Duties: Contact: Position Summary: Job Number: Department(s): Minimum Years and Type of Relevant Work Experience: Appointment Type, Duration: Additional Information: This is a position for a neuroanesthesiologist primarily to provideclinical anesthesia care with teaching opportunities to residentsand medical students. If appointed on the CHS track, duties willalso include education and research components.The School of Medicine and Public Health has a deep and profoundcommitment to diversity both as an end in itself but, also as avaluable means for eliminating health disparities. As such, westrongly encourage applications from candidates who foster andpromote the values of diversity and inclusion. 99063-AS Full or Part Time: 80% – 100% Wisconsin medical license or eligible for Wisconsin licensure.Board eligible or certified by the American Board ofAnesthesiology. Work Type: License or Certificate: Institutional Statement on Diversity:center_img Employment will require a criminal background check. It will alsorequire you and your references to answer questions regardingsexual violence and sexual harassment.The University of Wisconsin System will not reveal the identitiesof applicants who request confidentiality in writing, except thatthe identity of the successful candidate will be released. See Wis.Stat. sec. 19.36(7).The Annual Security and FireSafety Report contains current campus safety and disciplinarypolicies, crime statistics for the previous 3 calendar years, andon-campus student housing fire safety policies and fire statisticsfor the previous 3 calendar years. UW-Madison will provide a papercopy upon request; please contact the University of Wisconsin PoliceDepartment . Anticipated Begin Date: SEPTEMBER 01, 2019 Your application must be received through the jobs at UW portal tobe considered as a candidate. Apply at https://jobs.wisc.edu/.Search for Job ID: 99063-AS. Please apply online by clicking “”.You will be asked to upload a resume and cover letter.The deadline for assuring full consideration is July 15, 2019,however position will remain open and applications may beconsidered until the position is filled. Completion of Anesthesiology residency program and certified oreligible for certification by the American Board of Anesthesiology.Subspecialty training in neuroanesthesiology techniques andprocedures preferred. Instructions to Applicants: Job no: 99063-ASWork type: Faculty Full or Part Time, Faculty-Full Time,Faculty-Part TimeDepartment: SMPH/ANESTHESIOLOGY/ANESTHESIOLocation: MadisonCategories: Health Care, Medical, Social Services A530900-MEDICAL SCHOOL/ANESTHESIOLOGY/ANESTHESIO Degree and Area of Specialization: Official Title: Applications Open: Jun 7 2019 Central Daylight TimeApplications Close: Academic Staff-Renewable Diversity is a source of strength, creativity, and innovation forUW-Madison. We value the contributions of each person and respectthe profound ways their identity, culture, background, experience,status, abilities, and opinion enrich the university community. Wecommit ourselves to the pursuit of excellence in teaching,research, outreach, and diversity as inextricably linkedgoals.The University of Wisconsin-Madison fulfills its public mission bycreating a welcoming and inclusive community for people from everybackground – people who as students, faculty, and staff serveWisconsin and the world.For more information on diversity and inclusion on campus, pleasevisit: Diversity andInclusion NegotiableANNUAL (12 months) Duties for appointment to the Clinician Teacher (CT) track:Provision of clinical anesthetic care to surgical patients (i.e.working in the operating room, plus evening and weekend call ) inan anesthesia team model. Provision of clinical anesthetic carewill be primarily, but not exclusively, for neurological surgicalpatients. Teaching of residents and medical students in theoperating room, and occasional didactic sessions.Duties for appointment to CHS track: Major teachingresponsibilities for residents and medical students in theoperating room, and didactic sessions. Primary emphasis of teachingwill be in the neuroanesthesia patient care area. Provision ofclinical anesthetic care will be primarily, but not exclusively,for neurological surgical patients (i.e. working in the operatingroom, plus evening and weekend call) in an anesthesia team model orpersonally performed anesthesia. Opportunity for participation orto lead clinical research for interested and qualifiedcandidates.The successful applicant will participate in administrative andcommittee work to support the clinical and scholarly missions of UWHealth and the School of Medicine and Public Health. An essentialpart of these duties will be working in a collegial relationshipwith other faculty members. The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer. We promote excellence throughdiversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply.If you need to request an accommodation because of a disability,you can find information about how to make a request at thefollowing website: https://oed.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/ Employment Class: MD or DO, Anesthesiologylast_img read more

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Raising awareness about plastics pollution

first_img× JERSEY CITY – It was a day of environmental advocacy at Liberty State Park as environmental volunteers turned out for a shoreline cleanup at the park’s Caven Point Beach.The Sept. 16 event, sponsored by Liberty State Park, Friends of Liberty State Park (FOLSP) and NY/NJ Baykeeper, featured internationally acclaimed businessman-turned-environmentalist Dhruv Boruah, founder of global environmental initiative The Thames Project, which he created to raise awareness about plastics pollution in waterways.Boruah, who flew in from London, cycled on the Hudson River Estuary on his cycle and picked up plastics and debris from the waterway, later joining the volunteers at the beach for the shoreline clean up.“It was a great day cleaning up Caven Point with Liberty State Park, Friends of Liberty State Park and NY/NJ Baykeeper,” Boruah said. “It was wonderful to see the community engagement, sad to be collecting so much plastic, but very motivating to hear everyone’s promise to not just rethink their purchasing behavior but also to inspire their family, friends and colleagues to take action and think about solutions. We should not be cleaning up – we should stop this at its source. Awareness is great, but we need to find solutions to stem the plastic tide.”“We had a great group of volunteers come together to donate their time and help improve the amazing Caven Point Beach Habitat at Liberty State Park,” said Lori Garth Resource Interpretive Specialist with Liberty State Park. “We had young children exploring the shoreline and participants of all ages and backgrounds working together to remove plastics and other debris from the sandy beach and upland vegetation. We got to meet Dhruv and learn about his innovative projects and efforts in the battle against plastics in our waterways, we got to see amazing wildlife, and we made new friends.”Sam Pesin, president of the Friends of Liberty State Park, praised the volunteers.“Our volunteers reflect the diversity of those who use and love our inspiring urban state park behind Lady Liberty and Ellis Island,” Pesin said. “I’m delighted with this first time cleanup collaboration, initiated by the London environmentalist Dhruv Boruah, with the Friends, NY/NJ Baykeeper and Liberty State Park staff, which helped beautify this unique remnant sandy beach in our densely populated estuary.”“NY/NJ Baykeeper was pleased to have the opportunity to partner with Liberty State Park, Friends of Liberty State Park and Dhruv Boruah,” said Greg Remaud, NY/NJ Baykeeper CEO. “The shoreline cleanup was a great way to bring people together to help raise awareness about the issue of plastics pollution in our waterways. Liberty State Park is a cherished natural resource and we are grateful to all those who turned out.”last_img read more

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Watch out for changes to grievance law

first_imgBusinesses should be aware of changes to grievance procedures, warned legal expert Ray Silverstein, in a talk on employment law at the Bakers’ Fair in Sheffield.He told visitors to the event on Sunday, 19 October, that from next April, current statutory minimum procedures will be replaced by a revised Code of Practice, to be introduced by the Advisory Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS), together with non-statutory guidance.Most businesses currently follow a standard three-step procedure – a written statement, followed by a meeting, then an appeal meeting. According to ACAS, the new system will offer “greater flexibility”, but Silverstein believes it is “pretty vague”. He said he would advise businesses to continue to follow the current three-step procedure alongside any new guidelines.last_img read more

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A Father’s Choice: How Frank Havens Brought Home the Gold

first_imgIn 1924, canoeist Bill Havens had a choice: compete in the Olympics or witness the birth of his child. Bill chose the latter, and 28 years later, that child, Frank Havens, brought the gold medal home from the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki. Today, the Havens family is still on the water, including the now 92-year-old Olympic medalist Frank.Georgetown, Maryland. 1924. Brothers Bill and Bud Havens, former Mid-Atlantic wrestling champions, are standing at the threshold of a very different athletic benchmark: becoming the first canoeists to represent the United States in Paris at the Summer Olympics.It’s the first year canoe sprint has ever been an event at the Olympics. Bill, 27, and Bud, 21, compete against 20 other paddlers in the Olympic Trials to earn their place on a four-man canoe crew. For months, the brothers train day and night on the Potomac River with the Washington Canoe Club, preparing their physical and mental fortitude for the games. Bill, undefeated in both the one-man single and double blade events, has high hopes of bringing home the gold.But just weeks before the team is set to sail for Paris, Bill is forced to face reality—his expecting wife is due sometime in late July, the exact time at which Bill will be competing on the other side of the globe. The decision, though not easy, is obvious. Bill forfeits his spot on the team, and just four days after the games (at which Bud Havens and the rest of the U.S. canoe crew win three gold, one silver, and two bronze over six events), his son Frank came into the world.Bill never made it to the Olympics, though he continued to compete with his brother close to home. However, his sons Bill “Junior” and Frank, did. After serving in the Army Air Corps during World War II, the second generation of brothers qualified for the 1948 Olympics in London. Junior, largely considered the better paddler of the two, placed fifth in the solo 1,000-meter canoe race. Frank, surprising even himself, came home with a silver medal in the solo 10,000-meter event.Image courtesy of the Havens family.Buoyed by their 1948 Olympic success, the brothers moved in together in Vienna, Va., to train for the 1952 games. Their coach was none other than their father Bill. Junior and Frank spent the better part of the ensuing four years on the water, training to compete together as a tandem canoe team.“Even in practice they were beating the world record,” says Dodge Havens, one of Junior’s three sons. “It was pretty much guaranteed they were going to get a gold.”But Olympic disappointment struck again during the winter of 1951. Junior, who worked as a schoolteacher off the water, was helping a colleague move a car that had been buried by snow when he lacerated the tendons in one of his hands. In a matter of minutes, his chance for Olympic glory was gone.Frank, as his Uncle Bud had done 28 years prior, departed for the 1952 games in Helsinki without his brother Junior. With a time of 57:41, Frank set the new world record and took home the gold in the solo 10,000-meter event. In a telegraph addressed to his father after the games, Frank said, “Dear Dad, thanks for waiting around for me to get born in 1924. I’m coming home with the gold medal you should have won. Your loving son, Frank.”“Dear Dad, thanks for waiting around for me to get born in 1924. I’m coming home with the gold medal you should have won. Your loving son, Frank.”Frank competed in the Olympic masters division in 1956 in Melbourne and 1960 in Rome, but he never podiumed again. To date, Frank is the only American canoeist to win gold in a solo single blade event. Like their father and uncle, Frank and Junior continued to compete well into their 60s. The brothers, who preferred to race as a tandem team, regularly crushed the competition on both the national and international stages.“He was never bitter about it,” Dodge says about his father’s unfortunate mishap before the ’52 Olympics. “He was very proud of his younger brother’s success. They loved to race together in tandem events. They were pretty much unbeatable. Even when they were in their 60s and 70s, they’d high kneel [the traditional stance for canoeing] and beat everybody’s butts, even the 25-year-olds.”Between 1936 and 1953, Junior won 19 National Canoe Tilting Championships. Frank went on to be a six-time National Paddling Single Blade Champion. In 1985, at the age of 61, he competed in seven different events at the World Masters Games in Toronto and won every single one. In 1995, Frank was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame, a testament to his storied past and countless accomplishments.Frank (second from left) and brother Junior (second from right) practice for the Olympics. / Image courtesy of the Havens family.Frank, now age 92, is still on the water nearly every day. Though he last competed in his late ’80s with his son Dan, he’s proud to see that the spirit of the river has been passed down from generation to generation. Dan, age 65, and his son Sean have continued the tradition of training with the Washington Canoe Club. They both compete in the growing East Coast outrigger racing scene and regularly place in the top three.Junior’s sons Dodge, Keith, and Kirk are also accomplished paddlers and hold multiple Whitewater Open Canoe Downriver National Championships. All three competed in the Olympic Trials for the 1980 and 1984 Olympics, but didn’t make the cut. Keith’s sons Zane and Zaak also join their father and uncles among the nation’s top canoeists and have been competing and winning National Championships since the age of 10. Zane has been serving off and on for the past year as a crewmember aboard the Hōkūle‘a, a Polynesian voyaging canoe that has been circumnavigating the world.“I don’t know whether it’s in our blood or in the culture,” says Dodge, but according to Frank, being a Havens family member is synonymous with being a canoeist. You can’t be one without the other.Frank Havens, pictured in front of his “Bachelor Camp” along the banks of the Potomac, where he lived and trained. / Image courtesy of the Havens family.Q+A WITH FRANK HAVENSWhat’s your earliest memory of being on the water?FH: We were all brought up on the Potomac River. We had a camp on the river and my grandfather built this place. There was a huge room where we could congregate and have meals and stuff. I can’t remember when I couldn’t swim, so I guess somebody must have taught me early.What was your relationship like with your brother, Junior?As a young kid, Bill [Junior] being five years older, I used to follow him around like a puppy. He was the man. In high school he was Mr. Everything. He had such a reputation. He was phenomenal at everything he did. My aim at that time was to be as good as my brother Bill was. My brother was my main competition for a long time, especially in training. Early on, Junior was the best that was around. Having him out there to push me, I’m sure I got a lot better because he was around. I didn’t get to the point where I could whip him until we were both Olympic caliber.Frank, age 92, still gets on the water almost every day. / Image by Priscilla Knight for a story in Cooperative Living Magazine.How did you end up with the solo 10,000-meter as your signature event?My dad recognized early that Bill Junior used to push me hard in the 1,000-meter, but as I progressed, he recognized I had the capacity to do longer distances. I was always pretty good in staying with it and being able to get into a rhythm that would move the boat. I did better the longer the race was. It just came naturally.Do you remember what it was like when you arrived in London for the ’48 games?We went to London on a boat from New York and came in at Southampton. When we got there, the Germans had been bombing Britain all during the war, so Southampton still had burned out buildings there on the waterfront. London was still a mess. They put us [the athletes] in an evacuees’ camp. We were over there for six weeks. That’s where it all started. I started to come into my own a bit at those games.After the ’48 Olympics, you and your brother decide to train together for the ’52 games in Helsinki. What was that like?We moved in together, bought a house out in Vienna, and really hit it hard for four years. He was a schoolteacher in Arlington and I worked for an appraisal company. We would train early in the morning and after work, two workouts a day in the Olympic years. I can remember paddling the Potomac when it was pitch dark but we knew that river like the back of our hand so we never had any trouble with it. Our dad was our coach and he pushed you hard.When Junior injured his hand and had to give up his chance to go to the Olympics, you kept going. In what way did your brother still help you prepare for the games?We had planned to go to Helsinki as a tandem. We had trained tandem so long that I think I was able to increase my stroke rate which doesn’t sound like much but it takes some doing when you’re already paddling somewhere in the high 50s strokes-per-minute. To pick it up was something else.What is one thing you remember about your father and coach, Bill?High kneeling, it’s all about getting the blade in the water as far forward as you can and getting at it from your hip. It’s a rotation of your upper body from the butt up. My dad always said, “If you didn’t have such a big butt, you wouldn’t be as good as you are.”How did you feel going into the games? Nervous? Excited?I was always in Bill Junior’s shadow, like all my life. Up until ’48, I had never done anything that was “outstanding.” When I won the Olympic trials that year, that’s when everything changed for me. The girl I was really interested in decided I was finally a keeper. Everything seemed to start working out then.Walk me through the day of the race, from the start to the finish line.I was behind at first. I didn’t have a great start. In the finals there were a dozen competitors. I think I was probably in the first five out there. I remember passing the German, mainly because he made a grunt when I went by. And then all that was in front of me was the Czech and the Hungarian. I could see they were riding each other’s wake a little bit. Every time we’d come to a turn, they would come as close to the buoy as you can. Really they were kinda blocking me out on the turns, but I was still in the top three, so as long as I hung in there I knew I could possibly catch them if I had anything left. When we came to the final turn, they let a little gap out while they were changing positions. I put the bow of my boat right in that gap and gave it just about all I could. When we came out of that turn and headed into the last 1,500 meters I was probably a deck’s length ahead of them. I could see them in my peripheral vision. I knew they were right there. I think I only won by 12 seconds.Not only did you win that year but you also set a new world record. What did that accomplishment feel like?I was completely exhausted after this one. My teammate picked me up and handed me a flag and carried me around on his shoulders. It was quite an ending to a day. If it hadn’t been for a squeaky pully at the podium, I’d have cried, but when they were raising the flag, the damn pully was squeaking so it got my attention. That thing should have been lubricated.How soon were you back on the water after the ’52 Olympics?I had a day or two off, then I had to go back to work. I raced the Nationals in Philadelphia the next weekend.How has the sport of canoeing changed since you first started paddling?The single blade boat that I raced in at Helsinki, you never see any of those anymore in world competition. They have a boat now that is so narrow, I don’t know if I could get my knee in it. We paddled 17-footers that weighed about 47 pounds, something like that. Pushing [a canoe] for an hour on one knee, well, we did it so many times it was just routine. But the boat I raced in Helsinki would not be comparable to anything they race today.You and your brother continued to race for many decades after the Olympics. What were some of your favorite races?We raced the Canadian Masters for years and the World Masters. We really kicked butt in the World Masters after we were no longer Olympic-type paddlers. Of course, you’re paddling in age groups, so it got awful easy when you only had people within five years of your age to compete against. We went to Denmark and Sweden. We took a crew to Hong Kong, did an awful lot of paddling around the world. It was quite a life we had.Do you still paddle today?I hate to admit it, but I sit and do it now. I had a knee operation several years ago. I’m paddling a regular canoe. It’s a beast but I know I won’t have any problem staying in it. I’m not going today because it’s pretty damn cold, but I’m on the water most every day.last_img read more

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Haitians Vote for Their New President in Atmosphere of Calm

first_img Almost five million Haitians voted to elect a president on 20 March, in a day without serious incidents but marked by the return of former president Jean Bertrand Aristide and by some irregularities at polling places. Preliminary results of the balloting will be announced on 31 March, and definitive results are expected for 16 April. “Democracy has triumphed, and allow me to salute the primary architect of this victory: the Haitian people,” said Gaillot Dorsinvil, the president of the Provisional Electoral Council (CEP), during the press conference that brought an end to the day of voting. The 4.7 million voters were charged with designating the successor to the current president, René Préval. The winner of the contest between Mirlande Manigat, a seventy-year-old academic and former first lady, and singer Michel Martelly, fifty years old, will have the task of rebuilding the poorest country in the Americas, devastated by a January 2010 earthquake that left 220,000 dead and by a cholera epidemic. In a statement issued Sunday night, the UN mission in Haiti (Minustah) congratulated Haitians “for the patriotic spirit, calm, and discipline they demonstrated. The obvious enthusiasm of the voters shows the importance that the Haitian people ascribe to democracy.” The voting marked the end of a long and turbulent electoral season that erupted in accusations of fraud and episodes of violence after the first round on 28 November. According to the last poll before the election, published on Thursday, Martelly, better known as “Sweet Micky,” was the choice of 53.4% of those intending to vote, against 46.6% for Manigat. However, turnout, expected to be weak, made prediction difficult: only 23% of the 4.7 million eligible voters cast ballots in the first round. In another development, the second round was complicated by the return after seven years of exile in South Africa of former president Jean Bertrand Aristide, very popular among poorer Haitians. Aristide, fifty-seven years old, who gave up power in 2004 under the threat of an armed insurrection and pressure from the United States and France, did not endorse either of the competing candidates. Likewise, the return of former dictator Jean-Claude ‘Baby Doc’ Duvalier on 16 January, after twenty-five years of exile in France, had already complicated the political panorama. Both in Port-au-Prince and in the rest of the country, most of the 11,000 polling places were guarded by 23,000 police officers and Minustah blue helmets. By Dialogo March 22, 2011last_img read more

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Student organizations, leaders publish statement on sexual assault

first_img“[I thought] it would be really important to let survivors know that even though our university clearly doesn’t prioritize safety, there are people who do and will be working on your behalf to make sure that this university can be something that we’re proud of for years to come,” Shin said. “All of these things are things that are doable that the administration can do,” Caday said. “We’re not asking for a complete radical change of the University, it’s just … little changes that will go a long way in how USC’s campus culture is right now.” The statement includes a list of nine demands for the University, including providing rape kits on campus, funding monthly transparency meetings and town halls for students and involving students in the staff hiring process. Shin said she has been working with Undergraduate Student Government President Debbie Lee to plan how to move forward with these demands. Shin plans to present the ideas at a USG Senate meeting and to University officials who can help create change. Over 20 student organizations and student leaders from across USC released a statement Thursday to show support for the victims of former campus doctors George Tyndall and Dennis Kelly and demand the University to take accountability. “We didn’t want student voices to be ignored, and we were really baffled at the fact that any university could do this and not take fault,” said Shin, a senior majoring in social sciences economics. “Our university just cares more about its image than the safety of its students, so … we decided to take initiative because we were really appalled at the situation.” “We are deeply ashamed of USC’s inability to fully address and take fault in the sexual assault allegations that have scarred our entire community,” the statement read. “It is appalling that our university has consistently muffled the voices of students despite riding the coattails of students’ accomplishments and diversity.”center_img Caday said she wants to communicate and work with University leaders and administrators to ensure that the demands are met. Caday, a sophomore majoring in psychology and non-governmental organizations and social change, said that once the statement was drafted, they reached out to other assemblies such as the Queer and Ally Student Assembly, Latinx Student Assembly, Environmental Student Assembly and Black Student Assembly forco-sponsors. Shin said she hopes the statement helps victims and other students see that there are leaders on campus working for them. Asian Pacific American Student Assembly director Joy Shin, who worked with advocacy chair Richelle Caday to draft the statement, said that after attending events like the Feb. 20 solidarity rally and Feb. 27 Engemann Town Hall, where students had the opportunity to voice their concerns to USC officials and push for change, she felt that students weren’t being heard. last_img read more

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QPR planning for the future – Ferdinand

first_imgLes Ferdinand has told QPR’s website the signings of teenagers Axel Prohouly and Joseph N’Guessan underline a change of direction in the club’s transfer strategy.France youth international midfielder Prohouly, 17, and former Stevenage forward N’Guessan, 19, will be added to Rangers’ development squad next season.And director of football Ferdinand believes recruiting talented youngsters and moulding them into first-team players will benefit the club in the long term.He said: “Both Axel and Joseph are players that we’ve identified with the future in mind.“While there is much talk currently surrounding our transfer activity at first-team level, it’s important that we also recruit and produce players from the levels below.“We’ve publicly stated that’s our aim moving forward, and we’re pleased to have added both Axel and Joseph to our EDS squad.”See also:Two youngsters brought in by RangersQPR in talks to bring back MackieGnanalingam given co-chairman role at QPRQPR youngster gets French call-upFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Giants remain 0-for-September, lose sixth straight

first_imgMILWAUKEE–If the season played out as the Giants front office expected, Andrew McCutchen and Evan Longoria would be the leaders of a revitalized offense, Buster Posey would still be catching and Derek Holland would be finishing up a nice year as a long reliever.Expectations called for the Giants to contend in September, but instead the club is 0-6 in its final month and a season-worst six games under .500 after dropping a 4-2 series opener to the Brewers.Little went according to plan for the …last_img read more

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Happy 17th birthday Geocaching.com! What else happened on this day?

first_imgToday, September 2, 2017, marks Geocaching.com’s 17th birthday. Woohoo! (You’re lookin’ good — you’ve only gotten better with age!). But what else happened on this day in history?Here are 17 events that also happened on September 2nd. Queen Cleopatra VII declares her son, Ptolemy XV Caesarion, as co-ruler of Egypt, 44 BC.Ptolemy XV Caesarion2. Great Britain adopts the Gregorian calendar, nearly two centuries after most of Western Europe, 1752.Great Britain adopts the Gregorian calendar3. First bank robbery in the US: Bank of Pennsylvania robbed of $162,821, 1798.The other kind of cash4. A solar superstorm — known as the Carrington Event — affects electrical telegraph service, 1859.Solar superstorm5. Telegraph service between Germany and United States begins, 1900.Telegraphs around the world6. The first science fiction film, A Trip to the Moon, is released, 1902.Trip to the Moon7. Henri Rousseau, French post-impressionist painter dies, 1910.Henri Rousseau8. Margaret Mitchell, American author of Gone with the Wind marries Red Berrien Upshaw, 1922.Clark Gable reads Gone with the Wind9. First transatlantic round trip air flight is completed, 1936.Vrooooom10. Academy copyrights Oscar statuette, 1941.Oscar11. Dr. F. John Lewis 1st uses deep freeze technique in heart surgery, 1952.<312. Keanu Reeves, star of The Matrix and Speed was born, 1964.You take the red pill, you stay in Wonderland13. First automatic teller machine (ATM) is installed in New York, 1969.ATM14. German runner, Renate Stecher, runs 100m European female record (11.07 sec), 1972.Renate Stecher15. British writer, J. R. R. Tolkien, author of The Lord of the Rings dies, 1973.J. R. R. Tolkien16. British runner, Graham Salmon, set world’s record for 100 meters by a blind man, 1978.Graham Salmon17. Geocaching.com founded in Seattle, Washington, 2000.Bryan, Jeremy, and Elias18. Earth’s trees number just over 3 trillion according to study in Nature by Thomas Crowther of Yale University, 2015.Breathe easy! SharePrint RelatedInside Geocaching HQ Transcript (Episode 30): GIFFOctober 11, 2019In "GIFF"PROJECT GeoGames 2012 - A Lackey's JourneyJuly 24, 2012In "Community"Geocaching.com Co-Founder Celebrates Ten Years of Geo-LoveNovember 18, 2011In "Community"center_img Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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National centre increased police powers to tackle murdered missing women cases

first_imgAPTN National NewsVANCOUVER–The federal government announced Friday it was launching a “multi-pronged” approach to combat violence against Aboriginal women.Status of Women Minister Rona Ambrose said the government was putting $10 million over two years toward the creation of a national centre for missing persons and other pilot projects, along with introducing amendments to the Criminal Code to make the investigation of missing and murdered women cases easier for police.“As minister of status of women I am very concerned with the pattern of violence against Aboriginal women and the impact it has on families who suffer as a result,” said Ambrose.Ambrose said she found the “nearly 600 cases” of murdered and missing women “and the details of each” to be “distressing and shocking.”Ambrose also said that Aboriginal women faced more violence and death than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. She said Aboriginal women were also more likely to face domestic violence than non-Aboriginal women.The federal government had set aside $10 million toward developing a national strategy to deal with murdered and missing Aboriginal women cases in the last federal budget.Ambrose said the funding would go toward the creation of a national police support centre for missing persons which would provide coordination and specialized support on missing persons cases.Ambrose also said the existing police database that contains missing persons information would be enhanced to include additional data.A new website will also be created where people can provide tips on missing persons cases.Ambrose said the government would also be introducing amendments to the Criminal Code to allow police to obtain multiple warrants for a criminal investigation on a single application to a judge.Ambrose said funding would also go toward improving “culturally appropriate” victim services, enhancing community safety plans along with school and community-based pilot projects “to help break the intergenerational cycles” of violence and abuse.“This is an important day in the safety of women, particularly the safety and security of Aboriginal women,” said Ambrose.last_img read more

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