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Liturgical seamstress celebrates 20 years of service at Basilica of the Sacred Heart

first_imgFor the last 20 years, Patti Schlarb has served as the liturgical seamstress for the Basilica of the Sacred Heart — a role that has not only brought her across campus, but across the globe as well.In her role as liturgical seamstress, Schlarb is responsible for handcrafting the vestments and other decor for the Basilica and all the chapels on campus. Not only does she make items for Notre Dame, she also covers the needs of the University of Portland and the Holy Cross Missions in Chile, Uganda, Kenya and Mexico.But her work does not stop there.“I also am sailing on the seven seas, because I’ve made albs for the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan [which] used to have a C.S.C. chaplain … I’m all over the world,” Schlarb said.Liturgical seamstress Patti Schlarb has been handcrafting religious vestments for the Basilica and campus chapels for the past 20 years.Before coming to work at Notre Dame, Schlarb ran her own tailoring business for 20 years.“It just so happened that one of my clients that I had at my tailoring business was Fr. [Peter] Rocca’s secretary, and Brother Dennis Meyers who used to be here asked her if she knew anybody that sewed. So, she gave him my name,” Schlarb said.After three job interviews, during which Schlarb said she “was scared to death,” she started working at the Basilica. After 20 years in the position, Schlarb estimated she has made up to 100 vestments and 5,000 albs, on top of numerous other projects.Currently, Schlarb is right in the middle of her “busy season,” — preparing for Easter celebrations.“It’s one of those things I just have to keep going on each project that I work on, and I do it kind of like in a piece by piece,” she said. “I get one vestment done, I get the altar cloth done and I check them off my list. So as my time goes on, it usually takes me about 12 weeks to get ready for Easter.”After finishing her work for Easter, she then moves on to preparations for Holy Cross priestly ordinations.“We have five that are going to be ordained this year, so I have five vestments to make for them, and they’re all custom-made for each one of them — and yes, they take them with them, and they take them all over the world, no matter where they’re at,” she said. “I find it’s kind of a privilege because I basically go along with them wherever they are. It’s a good feeling for the ministry to do that.”Schlarb said not many people think of all the work that occurs behind the scenes in preparation for the different celebrations.“It’s very busy, and I think that most people don’t realize that everything is made here at the Basilica,” she said. “They just think that they open up a catalog and they buy it and it just appears, but that’s not the way it is. Everything that I make here is very unique, and is designed for the Basilica … I do a lot of things that nobody knows that I do. And even when somebody needs a button sewed on, I do that, too.”Her favorite part of working at the Basilica, she said, is working with the seminarians.“Seeing them come in … they really don’t know what’s going on, and by the time they become priests, they have grown so much and accomplished so much and it’s almost like I’m a proud mama, because they are like my children,” Schlarb said. “Because I’ve seen them for the last 10 years of becoming a priest. It’s very gratifying for me.”Schlarb said one of the most memorable moments from her years working as the liturgical seamstress was when she was given the opportunity to make the vestments used for the inaugural Mass of Fr. John Jenkins as president of the University.“He allowed me to go in and help vest him, and he signed a program for me and took pictures,“ Schlarb said. “I felt very very blessed doing that.”Schlarb’s work has even been worn by recipients of the Laetare Medal.“Four years ago the President’s Office called me and wanted me to design a ribbon that they could put [the Laetare Medal] on so they could put it around the neck like they do the congressional medals … so I designed that, and it’s now a tradition that they use that every year for the Laetare medal,“ she said. ”And the first two that were given out was Vice President Biden and House Speaker Boehner. They both have one of my ribbons.”Schlarb said she feels blessed to have worked at the Basilica for 20 years.“I know my business very well. It’s a very gratifying job, I’m not the type of person that needs a pat on the back,” Schlarb said. “I know what I do, and I know the quality of work that I do, and just to be at Mass and to see my creations and how much everybody enjoys it — that’s my gratitude that I get back. … I love my job. You can tell that. I do. I love what I do, and there aren’t too many people that say that they love their job. I really do love it.”Tags: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, liturgical seamstress, Patti Schlarblast_img read more

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02 Important resistance

first_img Volume XXVII Number 1 Page 2 By William Terry Kelley Georgia Extension Service There was a time a gardener could simply plant the same tomato or squash variety year after year with no problem. It usually tasted great, was easy to grow or was an heirloom variety handed down over the generations. Those days are increasingly gone. More and more pesticides are removed from the market every year, and home gardeners have fewer options to control diseases and insects. It seems that more plant diseases become problematic each year. The need for varieties to be resistant gets more important all the time. Unfortunately, those old heirloom varieties and many of the best tasting ones have little or no resistance to plant diseases. But with more disease pressure and fewer pesticide options, using varieties resistant to plant diseases is often the only option the gardener has to turn to.Chief disesase Chief among these diseases is tomato spotted wilt virus. Not a problem in Georgia until just a few years ago, TSWV has become the arch nemesis of the home gardener. This virus is a serious problem for commercial tomato growers. But it’s an even greater curse in the garden. TSWV is transmitted by thrips to the tomato plant. The virus is harbored by so many plant species it doesn’t have trouble being available to attack tomatoes almost anywhere in the state. The commercial grower has some pesticide options to manage thrips, although they are of questionable effectiveness. Famrers can use tools such as reflective plastic mulches, too, to deter thrips invasions. Over large fields, these mulches can confuse thrips and cause them to avoid the tomato fields. However, the home grower almost never has such options. Fortunately, researchers have begun developing some tomato varieties that are resistant to TSWV.Resistant options About the only two gardeners can get now are similar varieties called “BHN 444” and “BHN 555.” Both were developed by BHN Genetics. The 555 variety is primarily for use in a fall or late-summer crop, since it’s a heat-set variety. BHN 444 is more of a shipping-type tomato than a garden variety. It generally won’t have a usual tomato shape until it’s almost mature, and it takes its time getting ripe. It may not have the flavor or texture of your usual “Better Boy” or “Rutgers,” but it may indeed be the only way you can successfully grow fresh tomatoes in the garden. A couple of newer varieties may have better flavor and shape, but don’t look for them this season. Hopefully, continued research will yield more of these resistant varieties.Squash susceptible, too Much the same is true for squash. Four main viruses affect squash. On yellow squash, it’s easily distinguishable by the green coloration in the fruit. Some varieties now have resistance to two, three or even four of these viruses. Some varieties are not resistant, but contain the “precocious gene” which masks the green coloration in yellow squash. They still get the virus, but they don’t show the symptoms. Many of these resistant varieties are on the market today. Gardeners can tell which are resistant or tolerant to virus by reading the variety descriptions in the seed catalogs. Not all seed companies market these varieties, so you may have to shop around. There are other diseases to which varieties may be resistant.Price of resistance Often, the price of having varietal resistance is the loss of some quality or flavor characteristics. However, plant breeders are constantly working to improve quality and include resistance. Varietal resistance will become an ever-increasing part of vegetable gardeners’ weapons against those dreaded disease pests.last_img read more

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Ant Anstead Jokes About Christina Anstead Divorce After She Files

first_imgHe still has his sense of humor! Ant Anstead joked about his professional and personal life amid his divorce from his estranged wife, Christina Anstead.The 41-year-old mechanic announced his exit from Wheelers Dealers, which he’s starred in since 2017, on Monday, November 2. He subsequently opened up about his departure with costar Mike Brewer and his replacement, former Formula One mechanic Marc “Elvis” Priestley.- Advertisement – “For me, I’m sad because you and me have got an amazing bromance,” Brewer told Ant in a clip shared via his Instagram Stories. “There’s no, you know … People are gonna say ‘Brewer can’t hold onto these mechanics’ and all this nonsense.”Ant Anstead Jokes About Not Being Able to Hold Onto a Job or Wives After Christina Anstead Files for DivorceAnt Anstead Can Nguyen/ShutterstockAnt quipped back, “People say that about me and my wives!”Us Weekly confirmed in September that Christina, 37, and Ant called it quits after less than two years of marriage. The duo, who wed in December 2018, share son Hudson, 13 months.- Advertisement – “Ant and I have made the difficult decision to separate,” the Flip or Flop star wrote on September 18 via Instagram. “We are grateful for each other and as always, our children will remain our priority. We appreciate your support and ask for privacy for us and our family as we navigate the future.”Nearly two months later, Christina made it official and filed for divorce at a courthouse in Orange County, California, on Tuesday, November 3. A source previously told Us that the duo’s inner circle is surprised by the news.Ant Anstead Jokes About Not Being Able to Hold Onto a Job or Wives After Christina Anstead Files for DivorceChristina Anstead Courtesy of Christina Anstead/Iinstagram- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “Christina and Ant have been very private about this and friends are shocked to hear the news because they seemed happy together publicly and while in front of others,” the source said in September.The HGTV star was previously married to Tarek El Moussa. The pair, who finalized their divorce in 2018, share daughter Taylor, 10, and son Brayden, 5. El Moussa has since moved on with Heather Rae Young, whom he proposed to in July.“Tarek is sad that Christina is going through a hard time,” a second source told Us. “But [he] did not think that Christina and Ant would last.”Ant, for his part, was previously married to Louise Herbert for 12 years. The former spouses share Amelie, 17, and son Archie, 14.Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories!last_img read more

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Dutch transport scheme posts 12.7% profit [updated]

first_imgVervoer, the large sector scheme for the Netherlands’ private road transport system, posted a 12.7% gain in 2016.The €23bn transport scheme said this preliminary return figure included increases of 8% on fixed income, 11.2% on equity, 8.7% on real estate and 1.8% on infrastructure.In the fourth quarter, Vervoer’s investments yielded 3.4% over the course of the fourth quarter, with its equity holdings – roughly a third of the portfolio – generating 7.5%.The gains helped the pension scheme raise its funding ratio to 101.4%. However, the quarterly equity return was offset by a 0.2% loss on Vervoer’s fixed income allocation, and losses of 1.5% and 1.3% on property and infrastructure, respectively.Vervoer’s performance outpaced that of other large Dutch schemes. PFZW posted a 12% return in 2016, while PME, PMT, Philips, and KLM’s cabin staff scheme all saw gains of between 10% and 11%.Meanwhile, the €3.3bn pension fund of applied technical research institute TNO reported an annual profit of 9.7%.With gains of 12.9%, private equity was the best returning asset class of the TNO scheme last year. It said that fixed income and mortgages combined generated 9.4%, while equity and real estate yielded 8.8% and 6.9%, respectively, over the year.Following the decline of swap rates, TNO gained 1% from its interest rate hedge. However, the pension fund lost 0.3% on its currency hedge of the US dollar, sterling, and the yen.Funding of the Pensioenfonds TNO rose slightly during the year to 110.5%.last_img read more

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October 12 2002 The Italian Projects Roma Tre stu

first_imgOctober 12, 2002 The ItalianProjects Roma Tre students have arrived. [bottom] Valerio Pellegrini,Carlo Ciampoli, Alessandro Celleti and Alfonso Rubeis. [top] AnitaMaruccia. The five architecture students will complete a semesterprogram at Arcosanti earning credits with their University inconstruction, model making, woodshop, and a course with Arizona StateUniversity. [Photo & text: SA] This ItalianProject program links Arizona State University with Universita Roma Treas these students will attend one ASU Architecture course this fall.ASU professor Jeff cook has developed this new program with Arcosanti’sItalian Project. The students on their way to school. [Photo: T & text:SA] Randall Schultz isinstructing the students in wood working. Carlo has completed abeautiful new counter top for EC I and Alessandro is cutting it toexact size. [Photo & text: SA] Anita and Valeriowith their wood working projects. For more information on the ItalianProject contact Linda Roby(PublicRelations) or AntonioFragiacomo. [Photo & text: SA]last_img read more