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Manu Tuilagi to start for England Saxons

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Manu Tuilagi will make his Saxons debut against Italy ANineteen-year-old Leicester centre Manu Tuilagi will start for England Saxons when they take on Italy A this Saturday at Worcester’s Sixways Stadium. He is joined by team-mate Billy Twelvetrees, who partners him in the centre, while British and Irish Lions wing Ugo Monye and hooker Lee Mears will also make their return to international rugby.Harlequins flanker Chris Robshaw captains the side in which there are five debutants in total – Tuilagi and Twelvetrees, Harlequins prop Joe Marler, Sale flanker James Gaskell and Northampton lock Christian Day.Head coach Stuart Lancaster is delighted with his current crop, but says there’s every possibility he could lose any one of them to Martin Johnson’s World Cup squad later this year.“It’s an exciting group and we’ve got a bit of everything in the squad,” said Lancaster. “There are young players coming through, those getting their opportunities after showing great form in the Aviva Premiership and some who are older and more experienced who are keen to get back in the senior squad all of whom have added great value to the group.“These players have got everything to play for in a World Cup year and they know it. It’s a big chance for all of them and it’s important for them to play for each other. If they do that, the collective performance will enable them to benefit from it as individuals.”The Saxons will go on to play Ireland Wolfhounds the following Friday night in Belfast, and Lancaster says it’s been a whirlwind so far.“It’s been a short week to prepare to play Italy A but everyone’s bought into what we want to do and Worcester’s going to be a great place to play – a nice wide pitch and a passionate crowd – so it should be a great occasion,” continued Lancaster.Full team to face Italy A15 Mike Brown (Harlequins)14 James Simpson-Daniel (Gloucester Rugby)13 Manu Tuilagi (Leicester Tigers)12 Billy Twelvetrees (Leicester Tigers)11 Ugo Monye (Harlequins)10 Stephen Myler (Northampton Saints)9 Richard Wigglesworth (Saracens)1 Joe Marler (Harlequins) 22 Olly Morgan (Gloucester Rugby)Click here to find out why RW Features Editor Sarah Mockford thinks Manu Tuilagi is the answer to England’s midfield problemscenter_img 2 Lee Mears (Bath Rugby)3 Alex Corbisiero (London Irish)4 Graham Kitchener (Worcester Warriors)5 Christian Day (Northampton Saints)6 James Gaskell (Sale Sharks)7 Chris Robshaw (Harlequins, captain)8 Luke Narraway (Gloucester Rugby)Replacements16 James Buckland (London Irish)17 Duncan Bell (Bath Rugby)18 George Robson (Harlequins)19 Andrew Saull (Saracens)20 Paul Hodgson (London Irish)21 Brad Barritt (Saracens)last_img read more

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Hotshots: Glasgow Warrior Tommy Spinks

first_imgI wasn’t offered anything by Edinburgh or Glasgow when I left school but Simon Amor signed me. I learned a lot and have now joined Glasgow, which is a great opportunity for me.Have you enjoyed captaining Scotland U20?   I targeted the captaincy for the Six Nations and held onto it for the Junior World Cup. It is something I enjoy and take a lot of pride in. Home and away: Spinks has played at London Scottish LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS RW verdict: This 20-year-old lock/back-row has impressed the Warriors and is a natural leader.Want to stay up to date with the latest rugby hotshots every month? Why not subscribe to Rugby World? Click here for the latest deals, or find out how to download the digital edition here. When did you start playing?I started mini rugby at North Berwick when I was about five. I played for North Berwick High School 1st XV when I was only a fourth year. Duncan Harrison, the coach at Fettes College, helped me get a scholarship there.What other sports have you played?   My mum, Joanna Spinks, was around fourth in the world at judo when she was 17 and I did judo until I was about ten. In my first summer at Fettes I did athletics and got bronze in the discus at the National Schools Championship.You have just finished a year at London Scottish?  last_img read more

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Analysis: Two defining moments from the Premiership semi-finals

first_img Ticket to Twickenham: Dave Ewers celebrates his try against Wasps One was a straightforward win on an artificial surface in dry conditions, the other a harum-scarum humdinger amid pouring rain and a driving wind. The weekend’s pair of Premiership semi-finals looked vastly different.However, there can be little doubt that the final at Twickenham will pit the league’s two best sides against one another. In terms of technical ability, tactical awareness and sheer togetherness, Saracens and Exeter Chiefs have stood out from the chasing pack this season.Both have excellent coaching teams. They are penetrative and slick in attack. In defence, their commitment and cohesion rarely falter. Consistently minuscule error counts suffocate opposition.On Saturday, one moment from each of the Premiership semi-finals crystallised another common quality. The eventual victors share an aptitude and an appetite for unselfish, understated effort – the kind of graft that often goes unnoticed but regularly turns a match. First, Allianz Park.Saracens 0 Leicester Tigers 0, first minute Seven days after overturning Racing 92 to seal a maiden Champions Cup crown, Saracens had to reach into their emotional reserves to rouse themselves once more. Welcoming Leicester Tigers, fired-up and on the back of a fortnight’s rest, they seemed ever-so-slightly sluggish in the early exchanges.Luckily for the hosts, a typically industrious intervention from Mako Vunipola hauled them out of jail. The loosehead prop’s body composition renders him an easy target for lazy, smug wisecracks. His work-rate is immense. He made 18 tackles in Lyon. Consider that if you are thinking about judging a book by its cover and making a cheap gag about Vunipola’s portly appearance in a skin-tight match-shirt.Anyway, note where he starts as Owen Farrell prepares to kick off:In harness with his colleagues in a characteristically coordinated Saracens chase, he reaches the 22 as Mathew Tait takes:Leicester’s full-back breaks left, fly-half Owen Williams moving behind him into centre-field:Tait does make some headway but Duncan Taylor and George Kruis stop him. Mako Vunipola takes up the left guard position, with brother Billy on the right:Tigers scrum-half Ben Youngs initially shapes to pass right. Billy Vunipola gestures that way, where Maro Itoje is primed to career off the line:However, Youngs turns on his heel towards his left……finding Williams, who has identified a Saracens short side containing two forwards, including tighthead prop Petrus du Plessis. Tigers have two of their quickest players, Peter Betham and Vereniki Goneva to attack them with:Saracens’ defensive system is direct, based on blitzing ball-carriers. However, Williams has nullified this strength here. Saracens cannot charge off the line because there is too much space to cover. Instead, they must adapt to the situation and use a ‘soft’ drift, conceding ground in order to shepherd Tigers towards the touchline.As Williams transfers to Betham, Mako Vunipola crosses from openside to blindside in order to help what is a threatening situation:Chris Ashton must stay wide in order to monitor Goneva, and Betham outstrips Fraser. Mako Vunipola tracks back:When Richard Wigglesworth and Owen Farrell, covering in the back-field following his kick-off, combine to make the tackle… …and Leicester get very quick ball thanks to the support play of Williams and Youngs, both Vunipola brothers have retreated behind the offside line and are primed to confront the next wave of runners:Recapping Leicester’s break-out from the reverse angle, we can see how early Mako Vunipola identifies the danger. From his original guard position, he circles around the ruck as Youngs locates Williams……tracks across while the ball is moved to Betham……and sprints in pursuit of Betham alongside sibling Billy:Besides simple hard yakka to scramble back, there is anticipation and understanding on show here. The Vunipolas do not gravitate towards the breakdown. Instead, they fill the defensive line as Leicester bounce back right and Youngs finds Harry Thacker:Thacker cuts a good angle……and evades Billy Vunipola……but Schalk Brits and Mako shackle the hooker and hold him up while Brendon O’Connor latches on:Leicester locks Dom Barrow and Graham Kitchener add their weight……but still Mako Vunipola and Brits stand firm, the former fights his way on to the ball……and dislodges it from Thacker’s grasp:Barrow leans over the melee, securing possession illegally from a prone position while clearly not supporting his bodyweight:Play continues, Barrow offloading to Youngs……despite a quizzical look from Mako Vunipola towards referee JP Doyle……and dummying before slicing through the Saracens fringe defence as the hosts look to put pressure on the Leicester midfield:He beats Billy Vunipola and George Kruis……before sending Manu Tuilagi in under the posts:However, after a TMO review highlighted Barrow playing the ball on the floor, Saracens were awarded a penalty. They kicked to touch via Wigglesworth, making better use of the angle with his favoured left boot:Leicester did not enjoy possession in the Saracens half until Fraser’s try had put them 7-0 behind on the way to a 44-17 drubbing.It was American Founding Father Thomas Jefferson that coined the phrase ‘the harder I work, the luckier I get’. It fits Mako Vunipola’s off-the-ball toil perfectly here. And Exeter benefitted from the same mantra a few hours later at Sandy Park.Exeter Chiefs 27 Wasps 23, 76th minuteThe second Premiership semi-final reached a tumultuous crescendo, the atmosphere in Devon at fever pitch. We pick up the game as Wasps replacement scrum-half Joe Simpson bends at the base of a breakdown.Note the position of Exeter left wing Olly Woodburn, who will make a vital contribution: From there, Exeter’s potent attacking shape won a penalty and a lineout within striking distance. A driving maul went close before the ensuing scrum brought a penalty try, a 34-23 triumph and a ticket to Twickenham.There is sure to be plenty of eye-catching play when Exeter take on Saracens – bone-shuddering tackles, silky offloads, Hollywood turnovers. But keep an eye out for the inconspicuous work. These efforts will decide the title. We examine the moments that set Saracens and Exeter Chiefs en route to victory during Saturday’s Premiership semi-finals TAGS: Exeter ChiefsSaracens Simpson hits Jimmy Gopperth and the fly-half attacks, probing a gap between Geoff Parling and Thomas Waldrom with Christian Wade on his right shoulder. Meanwhile, Woodburn arcs in behind the Chiefs’ line:As Gopperth squeezes through the challenges of Parling and Waldrom……Julian Salvi, the streetwise Australian openside busts a gut to block off a potential inside pass to Wade and reach Gopperth. Replacement prop Alec Hepburn is sprinting back too:Salvi brings down Gopperth with the help of full-back Phill Dollman……and makes a nuisance of himself at the ensuing breakdown. Wade and Bradley Davies must clear out Salvi and the attack is slowed for a fraction of a second.Having made the tackle on Gopperth, Dollman stays on his feet so he can help on the next phase. Elsewhere, Woodburn has the ruck:At this point, Hepburn arrives in the defensive line and Dollman moves across to fill in at guard. One feature of Exeter’s game is that players are comfortable with performing unfamiliar roles. A full-back fronting up to defend the fringes is a prime example of this.And when Siale Piutau attempts a narrow pick-and-go, Dollman is there to meet him. Hepburn moves towards the ball and Will Chudley, a superb organiser, calls for Woodburn to come back towards the left wing.Like Salvi before him, Hepburn saps Wasps’ ruck-speed by threatening the ball. With the elder Piutau isolated, Simpson must hit the ruck before Sam Jones can join him:Gopperth must assume the role of scrum-half……and his pass is fairly loopy, giving Exeter precious instants. Woodburn tracks towards the left flank, Mitch Lees and Chudley coming forward and Parling and Waldrom rejoining the line:As George Smith moves the ball to Ashley Johnson, Chudley makes the decision to sprint up and cut off the path of a potential pass to the wing, where Charles Piutau is lurking (out of shot). All the time, Woodburn is sweeping around:Chudley turns inward, occupying Johnson’s eyeline and forcing a hasty decision. The South African attempts to find Charles Piutau by kicking into space, but Woodburn is in an ideal spot:And picks off the chip with ease:The ex-Bath wing is then cut down by Charles Piutau. With Joe Launchbury hovering, there is a real danger of an immediate turnover. However, Chudley is alert……and, in another demonstration of Exeter’s ability to ignore conventional roles and muck in, the scrum-half launches into the tackle area:Parling, Waldrom and Lees join the breakdown to help Chiefs retain the ball:Lees, who was colossal in the final minutes, unceremoniously hurls Piutau away from the breakdown……before calmly assessing his options……and, with Chudley buried, the lock steps in at scrum-half to feed Don Armand.Here, we see another of Exeter’s unheralded yet highly effective traits. Their forwards so often latch together before taking contact, enhancing the chance of a  dominant collision. In this case, Jack Yeandle and Tomas Francis grab Armand……forcing him through contact and ensuring the ball is recycled and protected while Hepburn readies himself for the next phase:Hepburn, a former Junior World Championship winner with England Under 20 and another superb signing from Rob Baxter, is joined by the tireless Parling as Chudley returns to his feet:The trademark latch comes into play again, with Salvi darting in from the right to play wingman as Haskell tackles Hepburn:Both Smith and Haskell attempt to compete on the floor, again threatening to eke out a penalty or pilfer possession. But Salvi rolls Haskell clear and Francis storms in to bump off Smith:Chudley then bounces back to the left where Armand is waiting to carry again:Waldrom supports, getting rid of Charles Piutau and Lees follows up. Chudley points Yeandle towards the breakdown too……before urging three more forwards – Hepburn, Parling and Francis – to get back to their feet.The scrum-half then deploys them carefully as blockers either side of the ruck. It is such attention to detail that has marked out Chudley as one of the Premiership’s best half-backs:Francis does his job well, screening Chudley from Launchbury and allowing his scrum-half to clear. Note Woodburn remains behind the kicker……before the backs lead the chase, another unsung aspect that Chiefs pride themselves upon:When Dollman joins in as Wade takes a quick lineout to Frank Halai, the entire Chiefs back division bar Gareth Steenson and Chudley – both of whom will be hanging in the back-field to cover – are committed to the chase.Indeed, this screenshot, with Salvi also arriving in the line, epitomises Exeter’s desire, fitness and togetherness:Salvi fells Halai. Not long afterwards, Yeandle put in a monstrous hit on Wade. Then, Henry Slade went low on Haskell and Jack Nowell ripped the ball clear. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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30 Minutes with… Tom Varndell

first_img Tom, who are the jokers at Bristol?Luke Arscott and Will Cliff. Luke’s been around the block and is an old head in the team but is a big kid. He keeps the young lads on their toes. I’d put myself in that category – a big kid who doesn’t want to grow old.What about practical jokes? There’s a lot of people pulling others’ pants down in the middle of them doing squats and general nudity.Any nicknames? Since I’ve been at Bristol it’s ‘Diesel’. They went from Varndell to Vin Diesel and then just Diesel. It’s nothing to do with what I’ve done or said. My nicknames from other clubs are rude!What are your bugbears? My housemates are really annoying. John Hawkins is a good lad but Will Hurrell is messy. I’m a neat freak and I like a tidy room. Will leaves pots in the sink and I’ve started moving the pots into his bedroom so when he comes home he finds them – that’s been quite effective.If you could be any of your team-mates, who would it be? Gavin Henson – 100%. He’s done The Bachelor and Strictly Come Dancing, and he trains when he wants – it’s a no-brainer.Making strides: Gavin Henson makes a break in Bristol colours. Photo: Getty ImagesDo you have any phobias? No, but I dislike mushy peas. I’ve disliked them since I was a child – my mum isn’t the best cook in the world.What’s your most embarrassing moment? Playing in the 2006 Premiership final against Sale (for Leicester), I got tackled and my pants got pulled down so everything came out. It was the one time I didn’t do my shorts up and I was in front of a packed crowd at Twickenham.Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with? Point the way: Tom Varndell celebrates a try earlier this season. Photo: Action Images Bristol wing Tom Varndell gives us an insight into his personality LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Donald Trump. I watched some of the American election and I can’t believe that someone can be that obnoxious. If I spent some time in a lift with him, I could see if he was that obnoxious in real life.If you could have one superpower, what would it be? Definitely flying. If training got too hard I could just fly off the pitch and no one would be able to chase after me.Who would be your three dream dinner party guests? Neither of my housemates – I’m sick of the sight of them! Probably Muhammad Ali – he was my childhood hero. Donald Trump. And Prince Harry – I think he’d be good value at dinner.Good value: Prince Harry has a kickabout. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s the silliest thing you’ve bought? The list is endless. When I first played for England and got my match fee, I bought a sound system that cost a fortune. It took four days to set up and I probably used it once. It’s in my attic but it’s obsolete now.What’s your guilty pleasure? KFC. I try to avoid eating it but after a tough game it’s a good pick-me-up.What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? To have a sports nutrition and fitness company. I love that side of sport and I’d like to help people achieve their fitness goals. I’ve done a few qualifications already and now I’m the other side of 30, retirement will be sooner rather than later.How would you like to be remembered? I’m chasing the Premiership’s top try-scorer record, so that’s one way to be remembered (he equalled Mark Cueto’s tally of 90 in Bristol’s win over Sale on New Year’s Day). I’d also like to be thought of as someone who was exciting to watch and who always played with a smile on their face.This article feature in the January 2017 issue of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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Ten reasons to buy Rugby World’s latest issue

first_imgWhat’s inside the April 2017 issue of Rugby World magazine? Get the lowdown on England’s bid to win three Six Nations Grand Slams – at men’s, women’s and U20 level. Plus, Chris Paterson and Gordon D’Arcy give their verdict on Scotland and Ireland’s championship.Rose show: England’s Danny Care is congratulated after scoring a try against Italy. Photo: Getty Images6. Under the SpotlightRead exclusive interviews with England’s Mr Versatile Elliot Daly, Wales scrum-half Rhys Webb, Scotland’s livewire Ali Price and Craig Gilroy, the Ireland wing who scored a hat-trick against Italy.Winging in: Craig Gilroy scored three tries in Ireland’s win over Italy. Photo: Getty Images7. How to throw into a lineoutWant to improve your throwing in skills? Simon Hardy, one of the world’s top throwing specialists who works with Bath and Harlequins, breaks down the technique and explains what you can do to master the hooker’s chief craft.8. The LozowskisThis season’s breakout star, Saracens fly-half Alex Lozowski, is following in his dad Rob’s footsteps. The father and son tell Rugby World about a sporting journey full of twists and turns.Runs in the family: We sat down with Alex and Rob Lozowski. Photo: Tom Watkins9. European Champions CupGlasgow, Leinster and Munster have insured it will not be an English French duopoly like last season, but which teams will progress to the semi-finals of this season’s European Cup? Stephen Jones analyses each quarter-final and makes his predictions10. Rugby Focus As well as big-name interviews, the new issue of Rugby World features an in-depth investigation into painkiller use in rugby while we also look at the Six Nations, the Lions tour, the European Champions Cup and more. Here are ten reasons to pick up a copy of the April 2017 edition…1. The Pain GameThis eight-page special report into painkiller use in rugby makes interesting, if not always pleasant, reading. RW’s Alan Dymock has spoken to numerous players past and present to get their insight into the lengths people go to in order to stay on the field as well as potentially harmful social issues.2. Tipuric & WarburtonJustin Tipuric and Sam Warburton have long been seen as ‘rivals’ for the Wales No 7 shirt but this Six Nations have been playing in the same back row to great effect. So what happened when we sat them down together? Find out in our exclusive interview. TAGS: Highlight In our 12-page section we speak to Scotland Women’s No 8 Jade Konkel, find out about London Irish’s end-of-season plans with director of rugby Nick Kennedy, catch up with sevens referee Rasta Rasivhenge – and bring you the latest grass-roots clubs news.Say it loud: Jade Konkel helped Scotland Women to a first Six Nations win in seven years. Photo: InphoFor the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Find out how to download the digital issue here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lift-off: Sam Warburton lifts Justin Tipuric in training. Photo: Huw Evans Agency3. Lions locks debateSecond row is arguably the most hotly contested area of this year’s Lions squad. With such strength in depth across the four home nations, who should Warren Gatland pick in his touring party and who should be in the engine room to face New Zealand? We asked nine locks to select their Test pairing – will you agree?4. How the All Blacks get an edgeRugby World joins New Zealand in Germany to get the measure of the back-to-back world champions, going behind the scenes to find out how technology off the field is helping the All Blacks on it.Sing when you’re winning: New Zealand line up for the anthems. Photo: Getty Images5. Triple threatlast_img read more

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A happy anniversary for Leicester Tigers as they toast 125 years at Welford Road

first_imgLeicester open the defence of the Anglo-Welsh Cup on Saturday. Rugby World looks at some of the facts, stats and characters associated with the home of this grand old club FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE TAGS: Leicester Tigers Tom Varndell’s late score to beat Stade Français in a European quarter-final, the historic and gutsy victory over the Springboks, and the emotional day when Matt Hampson was reintroduced to the crowd after his life-changing accident – just three of the more recent memories from 125 years of Leicester Tigers rugby at Welford Road.Leicester will be back out there again this weekend when they start their defence of the Anglo-Welsh Cup, which they secured last year with a 16-12 defeat of Exeter Chiefs.Gloucester – who will host this season’s final on 18 March – are the visitors for the first-round pool match as the Tigers begin their quest for a ninth Cup title in its various guises, with either John Player, Pilkington or EDF Energy having sponsored the trophy during the club’s previous triumphs.Bath, with ten titles from 1984-96, have set the benchmark but the Midlanders are hot on their tail. Before this season’s campaign gets underway, we reflect on some of the players and events of the past 125 years at Welford Road. Thanks to Leicester Tigers for providing most of the photos you see below, and to the official Tigers history book written by Stuart Farmer and David Hands, which provides a wealth of information.Farewell: Martin Johnson and Neil Back thank the supporters after their final home game in 2005MARTIN JOHNSON and Neil Back are two of the Leicester greats, playing 267 Premiership matches between them for Tigers and winning a shedload of trophies to go with their World Cup winners’ medals from 2003.Second-row Johnson holds the record for the most successive victories in a Tigers shirt, recording 31 between October 2000 and January 2002. He captained the club during their glory years around the turn of the century, including the back-to-back Heineken Cup wins, and only two men have led their side more often in Premiership rugby – Lawrence Dallaglio and Steve Borthwick. Johnson’s win rate as captain across his 132 league games was 76%.Back’s impact was barely less perceptible, the flanker scoring a club record 125 tries in 339 appearances. In his book The Death of Rugby, Back recalls how Ladbrokes set up a shop at Welford Road and offered odds of about 20-1 on him scoring the first try.That price soon plummeted to 6-1 as Back routinely finished off the Tigers’ formidable driving mauls, but he writes: “The odds on Garf (Darren Garforth) were something like 50-1. I know you weren’t allowed to bet on yourselves, and I never did, but we could really have made some money if I’d just slipped the ball to Garf instead!”Even so, Back’s scoring feats led to Ladbrokes losing a lot of money and they pulled out halfway through that season.The two men signed off at Welford Road in the same match, a 45-10 Premiership win against Wasps in 2005. They received a standing ovation and head coach John Wells said: “If you could write scripts you would have written that one.”Bricks and mortar: A drawing of the old clubhouse at the Aylestone Road end, erected in 1909WELFORD ROAD was just outside the town boundary when the Tigers signed a lease in 1892 to play on an acre of land there. The new ground, which was called Aylestone Road for the first few weeks, opened on 10 September 1892 with a match against the Leicestershire Rugby Union. Leicester won 17-0.The Leicester Guardian reported: “It is rather an unkind sneer on the part of non footballers to say that the new ground is in the right place, handy both for the infirmary and the cemetery!”The YMCA and the Press & Panto Company were among those to hire the ground and straw was purchased at 37 shillings a ton to protect the pitch from winter frost. The club committee considered floodlighting but decided against buying 12 naphtha lamps on account of cost.Try machine: Tigers wing Rory Underwood on his way to the line against Bath in 1995 (Getty Images)ENGLAND didn’t always play expansive rugby during the dozen years that Rory Underwood represented his country. So the fact he scored 49 Test tries – streets ahead of his nearest Red Rose challengers, Will Greenwood and Ben Cohen – tells you everything you need to know about the powerful Leicester wing who made a habit of brushing off tacklers.Underwood scored 134 tries for Leicester in his 236 appearances (1983-97) and today the former RAF pilot is a non-executive director on the Tigers board.“If you get the chance to go in the changing rooms before a game, the shirts are not laid out one to 15,” he says. “When we moved across from the clubhouse end to the new changing rooms on the terrace, you have players that have superstitions. For example, Stuart Redfern would sit by the door, I was in between Barry Evans and Dusty Hare – and since then it has stayed and is now a club tradition.”Redevelopment: Leicester and Saracens do battle in front of the emerging new North Stand in 2009WELFORD ROAD has been modernised regularly throughout its history and its current capacity of 25,849 makes it the largest purpose-built rugby ground in the UK.The 10,000-seat Holland & Barrett Stand (at the North end) was built in 2009 and is the country’s second-largest single-tier stand after Liverpool FC’s Kop. Featuring extra bars, hospitality and a new reception area, the £14m structure replaced the Members Stand that had stood for nearly a century.Spot the ball: No 8 Dean Richards, a legend in the making, scores for Tigers back in the 1980sDEAN RICHARDS made his Leicester debut in 1982, captained the club for four seasons in the early Nineties and as director of rugby steered Tigers to four consecutive league titles and two European Cups in the early years of professionalism. He clocked up 314 first-team appearances.Between 1998 and 2002, Leicester went a staggering 57 home Premiership games without defeat and Richards, the successor to Bob Dwyer, was the man in charge for all but the first two games of that sequence.The late Frank Keating quoted Les Cusworth in a piece about Richards in 2001. “We blooded Dean down at Neath, a hell of a baptism on one of those filthy wet nights South Wales always greeted us with,” said the ex-Tigers fly-half. After Clive Woodward became the England coach, there was plenty of speculation about who he would appoint as captain. Healey approached him one day flourishing a newspaper. Lawrence Dallaglio and Martin Johnson were listed at odds of 2-1 to get the job.“And look at me here,” said Healey, who was bottom of the list at 350-1. “I can scrape together £20,000. If you can match it, well, that’s £7,000,000 each! Just name me captain and we’re out of here!”Man of the Match in both of Leicester’s European Cup victories, Healey is also part of a distinguished band of Tigers to have won the League/Premiership Player of the Season award. The list is Martin Johnson (1996-97, 1998-99), Neil Back (1997-98), Austin Healey (1999-2000), Pat Howard (2000-01), Martin Corry (2004-05), Martin Castrogiovanni (2006-07) and Tom Youngs (2012-13).The way it was: Welford Road in 1959, a time when Irish great Tony O’Reilly played for the clubWHEN rugby resumed after World War One, Leicester embarked on an unprecedented run of 30 home games – all 19 matches in 1918-19 and the first nine games of the following season. Most of these were against service sides.In the 1930s the stadium staged major boxing matches, including the British Empire heavyweight bouts won by Larry Gains and Jack Petersen, and the ‘sport of kings’ returned to Welford Road on two occasions in 2010.In the summers of 1958 and 1959 the Harlem Globetrotters showed off their basketball skills at the ground. Ex-Tigers centre Mike Harrison, who made 210 appearances from 1962-71, says of that era: “My childhood memories of Welford Road are of coming here with my dad and brother and standing behind the posts on what was then a cinder bank. I enjoyed watching the game from the ends as you can see the patterns of play much better than the sides.”Tennis has also featured at Welford Road. Pat Cash and Ilie Nastase played a doubles match against Peter Fleming and Andrew Castle in June 2006, when a court was cut into the pitch.Cop this: the Royal Leicestershire Regiment deliver the match ball for a 2005 game. Nice Tiger print!WING Jonah Holmes, a summer signing from Yorkshire Carnegie, and Tonga full-back Atieli Pakalani will make their Leicester debut in Saturday’s Anglo-Welsh Cup tie with Gloucester (3pm).Tigers also field academy graduates Harry Simmons (scrum-half) and Sam Lewis (flanker) for the first time, in a team captained by fly-half Joe Ford. On-loan Dan Tuohy is at lock alongside Harry Wells, who was an ever-present in the successful cup run last season.“The league has been quite attritional this season, so this is a nice chance to blood some young players,” said Geordan Murphy, who takes charge of the team. “It also gives those who haven’t had much field time a chance to play and they’re all excited to be involved. “It’s a big game, it’s at home, it’s Gloucester, who have been in decent form and have already won away from home in the league and in Europe this season. So it’s for us to put on a performance to represent the Leicester shirt with pride and passion.”Holders: Leicester celebrate winning the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Stoop last season (Getty Images) Full house: Welford Road on a match day is one of the great sights in rugby LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “Those hard Neath boys were full of vile and evil intentions, especially when they realised our pack had chosen a first-up young English greenhorn. They got up to all sorts – but Dean just grinned that big daft grin of his, took everything they threw at him and never batted an eyelid. Suddenly the whole game revolved around him and we won 10-8. Incredible.”Take Courage: another title for Deano, now being discussed as a potential successor to Eddie JonesA giant in the tight exchanges, Richards didn’t wear the number ‘eight’ on his club shirt because of tradition. Instead, he wore the letter ‘G’, a convention that went back to the 1926-27 season when Leicester forwards first wore letters to aid identification. The lettering was extended to the whole team in 1931 and when everyone else switched to numbers, Tigers stood firm, sticking to their letters system right up to the late 1990s when tournament rules forced their hand.The Tigers first wore numbers on their backs at the start of the 1998-99 season, against Harlequins, and two years later we saw players’ names added as TV requested a further change to assist in identifying players on screen.Coldplay: ground staff clear snow off the pitch in December 2000. Behind them is the old west standONLY ONCE has adverse weather forced a postponement of a Premiership match at Welford Road – in December 2000 when frost prevented the match against Sale from going ahead. Prior to that, home league games against Orrell in 1991 (snow) and Sale in 1995 (frost) also fell foul of the cold, but overall the ground has proved remarkably resilient.In January 2010, ground staff and volunteers cleared 35 tons of snow from the pitch and terraces, enabling Tigers to beat Wasps 34-8 in the only game of rugby played in England that weekend.In November 1903, London Welsh were the visitors for a match played in such dense fog that for long passages, spectators could see nothing at all! In contrast, the September 1895 encounter with Gloucester was played in a sweltering 112 degrees.Paws for thought: Austin Healey with the Tigers’ mascot in 2001 – check out the state of the pitchSTEVE KENNEY scored the try that did for Moseley in the 1979 John Player Cup final, sparking a Tigers hat-trick as London Irish and Gosforth succumbed at Twickenham in the ensuing two years. The scrum-half formed a famous half-back partnership with Les Cusworth and by the time he played his last Tigers game in 1990 had amassed 365 appearances.“As an 11-year-old I used to jump on a couple of buses and come down and watch stars like Jonny Allen and Peter Tom. It was always a great way to introduce fans to the sport,” he recalls. “I remember back in ’69, Tigers were playing the Springboks during one of their tours and they used to come out of the tunnel at the clubhouse end. I used to say to myself, ‘I’d love to run out that tunnel one day’.”Austin Healey is another in the line of great Leicester scrum-halves, albeit that the England international proved one of the most versatile talents of the pro era. He is one of only four men to play at least ten Leicester matches at both scrum-half and fly-half, and one of eight to play in four of the five backs positions.last_img read more

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Face-off: Should the match clock be stopped for scrums?

first_img Pile-up: a collapsed scrum during the New Zealand-Namibia match at RWC 2019 (AFP/Getty Images) Face-off: Should the match clock be stopped for scrums?BEN ALEXANDERThe former Brumbies and Australia prop“As rugby (and all sports) battle Fortnite, YouTube and Netflix for the attention of future generations, how our game presents as a spectacle is becoming of greater importance. Not only is style of play incredibly important but so too the flow of the game and how it’s managed by the referee.Any negative play or wasted time must be stamped out immediately for the long-term good of the game. And as much as it pains me to say this as a former front-rower, the scrum battle is the biggest culprit for time-wasting!We’ve all seen it. A scrum is called and, shock horror, a front-rower goes down hurt and the game can’t continue. It’s usually a tight calf but as he or she bravely battles on, the time wasted allows them and team-mates to have a rest, while ruining the game as a spectacle for the crowd and viewers at home. The same problem occurs at lineouts… Down goes the hooker, unable to get to the sideline, so the game stops.Faking injuries is one of the biggest blights on the game, and a tactical ploy used by the unfit or by teams protecting a lead. As referee Nigel Owens once said: “This is not soccer!”Pausing the match clock when a scrum is awarded and restarting it once the ball is at the No 8’s feet is a good solution to teams chewing up time on the clock – but more is needed.The scrum battle is what makes the sport so great, but it cannot come at the expense of the game as a spectacle. It is time to speed things up!”Tight spot: Ben Alexander pops out of the scrum during the 2013 Australia-Lions series (AFP/Getty)ROCKY CLARKThe 127-cap England stalwart“I have definitely seen scrums chew up the clock before but I wouldn’t say it’s a regular thing. It comes down to having a decent referee who is educated about the scrum as to whether someone is deliberately dropping it or not. Many fans are fed up with the time wasted getting the ball in and out of a scrum, so should the game take decisive action? Read this debate from our August 2020 issue LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img It is the skill of a good referee to work out what causes an action. Referees should adopt a no-nonsense policy early on in order to eradicate any possibility of time-wasting. I certainly know as a front-row player that if you get penalised early on you toe the line.It’s also a tough one, assessing the impact of stopped clocks. You assume the ball will be in play longer, so a different type of conditioning would be needed. It’d be tough for front-rows who would have to give everything, every scrum, for however long they take, then play 80 minutes of rugby on top. It could shift the problem and make the game longer.Milestone: Rocky Clark after equalling Jason Leonard’s record caps haul of 114, v France in 2016 (Getty)Focus on educating refs on the dark arts. Take them into club training, or get club coaches on board as ref educators. Help referees understand why one action causes an outcome. Teach them what is being taught in clubland about the dark arts, to know what to look out for.Some referees look for the perfect ‘picture’ without understanding what might have caused an outcome.I wouldn’t rule out introducing a specialist set-piece referee but other areas can speed up, not just resets. Ruck times need enforcing and getting to set-pieces could be quicker.” “Here’s the mark”: Nigel Owens takes charge during England v Argentina at RWC 2019 (AFP/Getty)What do you think? Email your views to [email protected] debate first appeared in the August 2020 issue of Rugby World.last_img read more

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Ratifican los sudcarolinos su decisión de abandonar la Iglesia Episcopal

first_img [Episcopal News Service – Charleston, Carolina del Sur] La mayoría de los episcopales de Carolina del Sur que asistieron el 17 de noviembre a una convención especial en la iglesia de San Felipe [St. Philip’s] en esta ciudad respaldaron la decisión que tomara hace un mes el obispo Mark Lawrence y el comité Permanente diocesano de desafiliar a la diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal.Estos eventos tuvieron lugar después de que la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori restringiera el pasado 17 de octubre el ministerio de Lawrence, luego de que la Junta Disciplinaria para los Obispos de la Iglesia certificara que éste había abandonado la Iglesia Episcopal “por una abierta renuncia de la disciplina de la Iglesia”.Ese mismo día, el Comité Permanente anunció que la decisión de la Junta Disciplinaria, “había provocado la activación de dos preexistentes resoluciones corporativas de la diócesis, las cuales simultáneamente desafiliaban a la diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal y convocaban a una convención especial”.Jefferts Schori envió una carta pastoral el 15 de noviembre a los episcopales de Carolina del Sur en la que ofrecía sus oraciones y apoyo a los que desearan permanecer en la Iglesia Episcopal.“La Diócesis Episcopal de Carolina del Sur sigue siendo parte integrante de la Iglesia Episcopal, incluso si varios de sus líderes la hubiesen abandonado”, recalcó. “Si se hace plenamente evidente que esos ex líderes han roto del todo sus nexos con la Iglesia Episcopal, se elegirán y se instalarán nuevos líderes mediante una convención diocesana reconocida por toda la Iglesia Episcopal, en conformidad con nuestra Constitución y Cánones”.Durante su alocución, Lawrence llamó a la convención especial “el Valle de la Decisión” y afirmó que “es hora de pasar a la próxima página”. Él se refirió a los intentos de evitar la separación de la diócesis,  y sus tan mencionados problemas de teología, moral y desacuerdos con los cánones de la Iglesia.“Así sea…Nos hemos retirado de esa Iglesia… Hemos pasado adelante. Con la resolución de disociación del Comité Permanente, el hecho está consumado: legal y canónicamente”, afirmó.Si bien el obispo se refirió a las numerosas cartas de apoyo de líderes eclesiásticos, no anunció ninguna oferta explícita de afiliación con la Comunión Anglicana, y confirmó que por ahora la diócesis separatista no se afiliará con nadie. En una teleconferencia luego de la convención, él confirmó que la alineación no está sobre la mesa al presente.Sin embargo, durante su intervención, sí afirmó que “por ahora y en el futuro inmediato, habiéndonos retirado de nuestra asociación con la Iglesia Episcopal, seguimos siendo una diócesis extra provincial dentro de la Comunión Anglicana”.Tal designación exige un acuerdo de parte del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, que concluyó una reunión de 12 días en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda, el 7 de noviembre. Ninguna decisión sobre Carolina del Sur se tomó durante esa reunión y el Consejo no se volverá a reunir de nuevo hasta mayo de 2016.Luego de su alocución, Lawrence le pidió a la convención que sometiera a votación tres resoluciones. La primera resolución afirmaba las medidas tomadas por el obispo y el Comité Permanente y declaraba “que ya no estamos en relación alguna con la Iglesia Episcopal, incluida la unión o asociación de ninguna clase”. La resolución también hacía que la convención declarase que Lawrence era el “legítimo obispo” de la diócesis.“Al afirmar esto, declaramos que  así como Dios ha enviado al obispo Lawrence a ser nuestro obispo, sólo él [Dios] tiene la autoridad para declarar lo contrario” sigue indicando la resolución.La resolución también afirmaba que la convención “repudia las medidas supuestamente tomadas por la Iglesia Episcopal en contra de nuestro obispo y declara nula y sin efecto cualquier reclamación hecha por cualquier miembro o representante de la Iglesia Episcopal de tener autoridad de cualquier índole sobre esta diócesis o alguna autoridad sobre la congregación de Dios en cualquiera de sus parroquias que voluntariamente, por su presencia en esta convención y su voto en este resolución, así lo declare”.Una segunda resolución enmendó la constitución diocesana, eliminando toda mención de la Iglesia Episcopal, incluida cualquier referencia a la “cláusula de accesión [o consentimiento]”, en la cual la diócesis declara que acepta [sin salvedades] la Constitución y Cánones de la Iglesia Episcopal. Esa declaración se exige en el Artículo V, Sección 1 de la Constitución de la Iglesia.La convención diocesana había revisado previamente su constitución limitando la cláusula de accesión al decir que se avendría a la Constitución y Cánones de la Iglesia Episcopal sólo si éstos no fueren “incompatibles o contradictorios con” la constitución y cánones de la diócesis.La resolución también eliminó cualquier referencia a la Convención General, haciendo de la convención diocesana su único organismo de gobierno. La tercera resolución eliminó todas las referencias a la Iglesia Episcopal de los cánones diocesanos.Cuarenta y dos parroquias asistieron a la convención especial junto con 12 misiones [organizadas] que enviaron un total de 170 delegados laicos. Hay 78 congregaciones en la diócesis.Las primeras dos resoluciones fueron aceptadas por aclamación. La tercera resolución para cambiar los cánones de la Iglesia fue aprobada con una mayoría del 90 por ciento en una votación por nombre —incluido el voto de Lawrence. La votación sobre la resolución, que requería dos tercios para ser aprobada, incluyó varias abstenciones.Según un volante informativo publicado en la página web de la Iglesia Episcopal: “Las diócesis no pueden abandonar la Iglesia Episcopal. Si bien algunos clérigos e individuos pueden decidir irse, las congregaciones y las propiedades siguen en la diócesis para ser usadas para la misión de la Iglesia Episcopal”.– Sarah Moïse Young es una reportera independiente radicada en Charleston, Carolina del Sur. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA clovis Erly Rodrigues says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 November 23, 2012 at 6:10 am É uma tristeza enorme a decisão de Lawrence e seus seguidores.A primeira contradição é dizer que não aceitam os Cnones Gerais,somente se estes concordam com os diocesanos.Segundo emtoda a história da Igreja não ohá a palavra filiação, pois nãoé uma empresa com matriz e filiais. Mas sim um corpo.Nun ca as paixões individuais, a busca de poder e prestigiopor alguns pode afetar o todo. Que Deus tenha misericordia,em Cristo +Clovis, emérito IEAB Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ratifican los sudcarolinos su decisión de abandonar la Iglesia Episcopal Youth Minister Lorton, VA Por Sarah Moïse YoungPosted Nov 20, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

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Video: Praying for a holy land

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI December 27, 2012 at 11:12 am The important work of the Diocese of Jerusalem is a gift to those they serve of all faith traditions. Education and compassionate healthcare are offered throughout Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon. The Holy Land is the root of our faith tree. We must support those who labor as stewards of this land and this tradition. Learn more about the Diocese at http://www.j-diocese.org or their humanitarian work at http://www.afedj.org. Consider a visit which will transform your life in ways you don’t expect. And John McCann, let’s talk. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Anne Lynn says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 December 25, 2012 at 12:46 pm Beautiful. Truth and hope is always beautiful.Yes, pray, but be that supporter and advocate.Merry Christmas Rector Shreveport, LA By Matthew DaviesPosted Dec 25, 2012 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Middle East, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Video Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and the Middle East runs more than 30 education and healthcare institutions throughout Israel, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and the Palestinian Territories, bringing vital services and a much-needed lifeline to the local community.The diocese and many of its institutions operate against a backdrop of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that has lasted for more than 60 years. The Christian minority is increasingly emigrating in search of a better life and better opportunities overseas.The living stones of the holy land and the ministry of the Christian institutions encourage people from all over the world to invest in the region, but more support and advocacy is needed to ensure the Christian presence remains.The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem has been instrumental in ministering to the needs of the community and working with its ecumenical partners towards achieving peace in the holy land. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Israel-Palestine, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rev, Vicki Gray says: Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (3) Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC John McCann says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Video: Praying for a holy land Cathedral Dean Boise, ID December 25, 2012 at 5:09 pm I am an active lay member of the Trinity Wall Street & St. Paul’s Chapel in New York, which stand as places of pilgrimage for those in search of world peace. These two venerable churches, St. Paul’s being the oldest in New York, are literally a block from the site of the World Trade Center, and their survival, and mission of ministering to the first responders brought the response of the first responders. They have also become places of ecumenical sharing- St Paul’s is sharing its space with a young synagogue, Tamid. I am in the midst of studying the 3 Abrahamic religions, and taking the EFM theological course which lasts for four years. In a couple of years I would like to begin conversations about how I can bring my discerned vocation of social action, and religious dialogue to the Diocese of Jerusalem, your work is a beacon of hope in these times of trouble. Christmas blessings to you!last_img read more

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England’s laity reject ‘no confidence’ vote in their chair

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] A majority of members of the Church of England’s House of Laity rejected a resolution that would have registered a vote of “no confidence” in their chair, Dr. Philip Giddings of the Diocese of Oxford.An emergency meeting of the House of Laity had been scheduled for Jan. 18 at Church House in Westminster after several members had raised concerns about a speech Giddings delivered at the November 2012 General Synod in which he opposed the legislation for women bishops as “unwise” given that a “significant minority” of the church are unable to accept its provisions.Giddings’ speech had immediately followed one from archbishop of Canterbury-elect and Bishop of Durham Justin Welby, who spoke in favor of the legislation.The mover of the motion, Stephen Barney of Leicester, had argued that the speech “directly undermined” what Welby had said. Barney also said in a written explanation that Giddings’ speech had been “instrumental in convincing some of the undecided members of the house to vote against,” and was a “significant contributor to the reputational damage the Church of England is already suffering.”Although 81 members of the House of Laity had requested to speak during the Jan. 18 emergency meeting, time restraints partly caused by heavy snowfall in London meant that fewer than half were called to the podium.A procedural motion to postpone the debate failed. The main motion, “That this House have no confidence in Dr. Philip Giddings as Chair of this House,” was lost with 47 voting in favor, 80 against, and 13 recorded abstentions.Following the vote, Giddings, 66, said that he would now take careful advice from colleagues about how to proceed. “We do need to have a debate about what are the expectation of the chair and vice chair,” he said. “I hope and pray that we can now put this behind us and the temperature can be lowered and we can seek to work together for the sake of God’s mission to this country.”The Church of England on Nov. 20 rejected legislation that would have enabled women to become bishops, an action that has since received sharp criticism.The legislation had required a two-thirds majority in all three houses of laity, clergy and bishops at General Synod, the church’s main governing body. The measure passed the houses of bishops and clergy, but failed in the House of Laity by 6 votes.Barney told the House of Laity on Jan. 18 that “national figures from the prime minister and down are saying that we must fix this. Rowan Williams has repeatedly highlighted the damage that this has done to the church.”“It is about what is appropriate conduct for someone who has so much influence,” he said. “He knew the will of the majority for which he was chair was contrary to his own opinion and it was inappropriate for him” to opine “in the corridors of power as he did on the women bishop’s debate.”Ahead of the two-hour debate, Giddings said, “I understand that many members of this house and outside were distressed by the decisions made in November, [but] it is our calling as an Anglican church to seek to be comprehensive. It is precisely because they are the minority that we should seek to find a way to encompass them.”Giddings also said that he could not have chosen when he would be called on to speak during the November debate and that Archbishop of York John Sentamu was chairing the meeting and made those decisions. Although Giddings said that he could not see how his comments could reasonably be construed as undermining or criticizing Welby, he nevertheless offered the bishop an apology for any offence he may have caused him.Giddings told the laity Jan. 18 that Welby replied, saying it had “never crossed my mind that you were in the slightest bit discourteous…I did think you were wrong, but we really need to be able to disagree as I’m sure you do agree.”Among those who were called to speak were Fay Wilson-Rudd of Bath and Wells who said she thinks “we are kidding ourselves if we think we will ever find a chair who will represent all of our views. What I believe that is really being called into question is the method of governance [and] … clarity over the role of our chairs. This house is not equipped to deal with these matters alone.”Deborah McIsaac of Salisbury said the motion seeks to make Giddings a scapegoat “and it will not undo the damage of reputation of the House of Laity. It will do further damage to this church, General Synod and this house and will be interpreted as a vindictive action.Some speakers also cited as problematic Giddings’ role as convener of Anglican Mainstream, a global conservative network that stands in opposition to the full inclusion of gays and lesbians in the church.One speaker noted that Giddings had been a key opponent of the appointment of openly gay priest Jeffrey John as bishop of Reading in 2003.But Clive Scowen of London said that the House of Laity elected Giddings knowing his views and his role with Anglican Mainstream.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (2) Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Joyce Ann Edmondson says: Marc Kivel says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Matthew DaviesPosted Jan 18, 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET England’s laity reject ‘no confidence’ vote in their chair Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 5, 2013 at 7:55 am And folks in church hierarchies wonder why membership keeps falling…. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release January 21, 2013 at 4:44 pm Since the gay/lesbian/women priests issues cause so much concern because of the biblical references, it seems to me that an explanation or instruction from the Episcopal church about these references should be forthcoming from the church. If you take the references literally, it seems to be going against scripture to accept women as leaders, or active gay men and lesbians in any capacity as leaders in the church or world. But if you love one another, even your enemies and follow Christ, then you must accept them as equally loved by God. We need instruction on all of this. It’s the same as reading that Moses received the 10 commandments from God, one of which says “Thou shalt not kill” and then instructs Moses and others to go into the land he is giving to them and killing the women, men and children and take over the land. What is that all about?You cannot ordain women and then forbid them to rise through the ranks. That is both hypocrisy and prejudice.Peace be with you. Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

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