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Belles connect with area restaurants, businesses

first_imgSaint Mary’s students will get to taste and familiarize themselves with the services and products of food establishments throughout South Bend on Thursday night at the Taste of Saint Mary’s event from 8 to 10 p.m. in the Student Center Lounge. Student body president and senior Maureen Parsons said the Taste of Saint Mary’s, which is free to all students and sponsored by the Student Government Association (SGA), is designed to help attendees establish connections with local restaurants and businesses. “The Taste of SMC is an event that allows local businesses to market their product or service to students,” she said. “[SGA] wanted to have the Taste of SMC to build a relationship between the students and the community of South Bend. It is an opportunity for students to learn about what is available in the community.” Parsons said she believes the Taste of Saint Mary’s is a great way for students to enjoy some free food while also getting acquainted with local businesses and different ways to enjoy their services. “The business can offer free samples, sell merchandise, provide their services or simply talk about their business,” she said. “[Some of the businesses] will be giving away free samples of their products.” Several local businesses and restaurants are participating in the event, including Flourish Boutique, Papa John’s, Salon Nouveau, Urban Swirl, Salon Rouge and Biggby Coffee, Parsons said. While the event is free, as are most of the services, Flourish is selling some merchandise. Parsons said the SGA organized the event by reaching out to businesses to gather an interest of which ones would want to participate in  the even, then sent out informational packets to move the process along. Parsons said she is hopeful this event will become an annual event and that more businesses will participate in the next one. “We hope that students will learn more about what South Bend has to offer,” she said. “Many businesses in the community have great student discounts that our students are not aware of. We really want to start working with the community and building a relationship with businesses for the future.”last_img read more

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Professors discuss options for Syria

first_imgSyrian leader Bashar al-Assad agreed to destroy the troubled Middle Eastern country’s chemical weapons Tuesday in a deal brokered by Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.  Professor David Cortright of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, who moderated Tuesday’s panel discussion on the United States’ role in the Syrian crisis, said this development proves the use of force against Syria would have been the wrong decision for the United States. “I hope what we learn from this is that diplomacy can be effective, that the solution to this turns out to be a diplomatic agreement, not military strikes,” Cortright said. “Although … the threat of military strikes helped to catalyze the diplomatic action.” Cortright said the United States should realize that Russia could be a helpful ally in dealings with the Middle East. “We can benefit from cooperating with Russia,” he said. “Everyone was sort of bashing Russia these days, but as much as we may disagree with some of Mr. Putin’s policies, the fact of the matter is that Russia’s cooperation can be very important in solving some of these difficult challenges.”  Another difficult challenge Russia could help solve is the nuclear problem in Iran, Cortright said. “It’s very significant that Iran expressed support for the Russian deal right away; within four or five hours of when it was announced, the Iranian foreign ministry said, ‘We support this proposal,’” he said. “That sent a message to Assad that … his two main patrons basically said, ‘Here’s the deal.’ He really had no choice but to accept it.”  Cortright said although the chemical weapons deal negates the possibility of immediate United States military intervention in the region, Congress may pass a resolution to discuss the use of force at a later date if Syria reneges on its promise.  “Senator [Harry] Reid made a speech just the other day … and that’s basically the veiled message that he’s making – that we need to keep the potential threat of military action still in the background, not take it off the table entirely,” Cortright said.  In the meantime, Cortright said he thinks it’s the United Nations’ job to make sure Syria sticks to its chemical weapons agreement. “I’ve advocated for a long time that the U.N. should be front and center in this whole question,” he said. “The administration initially mishandled the U.N. because the first proposal they made to the U.N. was military action. There was no way Russia was going to support that, or Argentina, or China; several countries on the [Security] Council said ‘no’ right away. So that was a mistake. But now, Secretary [of State John] Kerry, apparently, and the [Obama] administration and certainly the French, have said we need to go to the U.N. now to get the U.N. to implement the Russian deal.” Cortright said the U.N. is most qualified to ensure Syria disposes of its chemical weapons.  “I’m sure we will insist upon on-the-ground monitoring to make sure this is really happening, and that’s a role for the U.N.,” he said. “The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) – they have the experts … It’s an organization that was created through a U.N. process, although it’s an independent organization. But it reports to the U.N., so the U.N. working with the OCPW will need to play a key role in monitoring and implementing this resolution.”  Cortright said the Catholic Church has been vocal in its opposition to military interference in Syria, and its hierarchy is most likely pleased with the diplomatic deal and the role of the U.N. in implementing it. “The Church position is that war and military action is always a defeat for humankind. It’s always a violation of God’s desires for humans to be more loving and more godlike in our lives,” Cortright said. “They had this prayer vigil at the Vatican this weekend … that seemed almost like a peace rally, and the Pope stayed for most of it, and it went well into the night.” The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops also released two letters urging peaceful solutions, one addressed to Congress and the Obama Administration and one addressed to the leaders of the G20 Summit, Cortright said.  Cortright said he believes the Church is happy that military intervention in Syria is off the table, at least for now. “I haven’t seen yet a statement from the bishops or the Vatican, but I suspect that everyone’s relieved and is perhaps believing that they’re prayers were probably answered,” he said.last_img read more

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Alumnus named Mitchell Scholar

first_imgOn Nov. 25, The U.S.-Ireland Alliance announced a 2008 Notre Dame alumnus is one of this year’s Mitchell Scholars and will receive a full scholarship to a one-year Master’s program in Ireland.  Molly Hayes, a Kenya desk officer at the U.S. Department of State who graduated from Notre Dame with degrees in English and Arabic, was one of 12 people selected from a pool of 300 applicants.  According to her biography on the Mitchell Scholars website, Hayes has worked as desk officer for multiple North African nations, and she was a deputy coordinator for the Egypt Task Force during the Arab Spring.  During Hayes’s time at Notre Dame, the biography said, she founded ND-Abroad, which worked to help students studying abroad and “developed a University Counseling Center support group for students who experienced trauma abroad.”  Hayes plans to study postcolonial and world literature at National University of Ireland, Maynooth, according to the biography. Dr. Jeffrey Thibert, assistant director of National Fellowships at the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), said the award, which is on par with the Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships, will bring prestige to the University.  “These are the kinds of things that raise the academic profile of an institution and really enhance Notre Dame’s reputation as a world-class research institution, and really is providing a world-class undergraduate education,” Thibert said. “I think, especially in Molly’s case, it’s a testament to the kind of … education she received here that helped her to achieve such great things in the past four to five years since she left.”  Thibert said the award also raises the profile of CUSE, through which Hayes did research when she was an undergraduate.  “There are a lot of opportunities here, in part through CUSE, but also through other groups on campus to receive funding for undergraduate projects, undergraduate research of all different kinds,” he said. “I’ve been at a few other institutions, and I’m amazed at how much support there is for that here, so I would really encourage people to take advantage of that. “[Doing research through CUSE] contributed, in a sense, to her winning this award, but it also contributed to her being able to get into the kinds of positions she got into with the State Department. And I think that made a really big difference in her application to have these kinds of experiences, which she might not have been able to have if she had not had the opportunities she had here.”  Thibert said while some scholarship applications require University endorsements, the Mitchell Scholars Program does not. He said his office worked with her on other aspects of the application.  “We mostly worked on interviewing advice,” Thibert said. “We have sort of a database of information from past years because we’ve had people interviewing for these things and there’s also a fellowship adviser organization that collects information on these things. We were giving her some advice on what to expect from the semifinalist interview and then from the finalist interview.”  Thibert said he also hopes the fact that Hayes won the scholarship will raise awareness of the opportunities Notre Dame alumni have, even after they graduate.  “We’re trying to do more to reach out to these alumni to get the word out about some of these awards, because sometimes people think when they graduate, that’s kind of it,” he said. “Even if they know they’re eligible for certain things, they don’t realize they can still work with us, but they can. As long as someone graduated from here, we are happy to work with him [or her].”  Contact Emily McConville at [email protected]last_img read more

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Faculty weighs in on proposed core curriculum changes

first_imgThe Core Curriculum Review Committee released its final report Aug. 31, after taking feedback on a draft report released last November. The proposed changes would reduce the number of required math and science courses and modify the requirements related to the arts, humanities and social sciences. According to the report, if the changes are accepted, they will be the most significant changes to the core curriculum in more than 40 years.Lindsey Meyers In order to take effect, the Academic Council and University President Fr. John Jenkins will have to approve the proposal.“The old requirement was two math, two science and now it’s one of each plus one more of either — so it indicates a bit of a decrease,” mathematics department chair Jeffrey Diller said. “No one likes to see their own area deemphasized. That said, there seems to be a ton of interest in math courses, requirements aside, these days. I don’t think we’re very worried about loss of enrollment or something in freshman course offerings. “Lots of people take calculus; I think econ, in particular, has been stressing taking calculus classes even more. The practical effect of it is, in truth, probably not that large for us.” Diller said he felt “neutral” toward the possible decrease in math classes and that his “concerns will be elsewhere,” specifically with students not being able to use AP credit to fill requirements.“So if you got a five on the Calculus BC exam that doesn’t automatically get you out of the University math requirement — you still need to take a math course, but it could be something down the road from calc I or II,” he said. “We’ll be very concerned that the advising matches that change. It’s a shame if people who took calc I and II in high school take it again because that’s just the simplest thing to do under the circumstances. We’ll be concerned to find courses where people actually see something new.”The report indicates that students would be required to take one class each in “quantitative reasoning” and “science and technology” and one additional course in either. Diller said the change in name could indicate an expansion in who can teach classes related to math. “In truth, even under the old system, it was possible for another department to propose a course that would fulfill the math requirement, but there never were any proposals,” he said. “Maybe that will change now for reasons that I can’t see. Even with the change in name, there was this opportunity before to have courses offered by people other than us.”The report also recommends requiring students to take a foundational philosophy course, but allowing a student to take a second course in philosophy or one in “Catholicism and the Disciplines” (CAD), a new category of courses that cover Catholic topics, but can be in any field.“When taught well, philosophy courses don’t just give students a body of information,” philosophy department chair Jeff Speaks said in an email. “They also teach students to form and defend their own views about the right answers to fundamental questions about the universe and themselves. “According to the recommendation, CAD courses must have this normative dimension as well. If they really do, then I think that the proposed changes will open up some interesting opportunities for Notre Dame students. If they don’t, then we will have taken a step in the wrong direction.”Diller said the proposed changes essentially come down to how much the University requires students to step out of their specific field of study.“Is it a good idea to make students take courses outside of their area of interest, or should we be like Brown [University], for instance, where there are basically no general requirements and people just take exactly what they want to take?” he said. “That’s somewhat above my paygrade, but I am sort of in favor in pushing people to try stuff outside of their specific area.”In addition to advising students to take appropriate math classes, Diller said he also has concerns about flexibility in course schedules.“This does make things somewhat more flexible for a lot of students, but not for science or engineering students,” he said. “It would be nice to see more flexibility for them. … I don’t see that the core curriculum has touched on this at all.”Tags: academics, Core Curriculum, core curriculum review committee, University Requirementslast_img read more

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CUSE workshops aim to broaden undergraduate research opportunities

first_imgIn an effort to promote intellectual development, the Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) hosts workshops across campus that cater to undergraduates interested in research, scholarly engagement, creative endeavors and fellowships.Assistant director of undergraduate research, Yvonne Mikuljan, said the CUSE workshops introduce students to various kinds of research and learning experiences while offering advice about how to pursue those opportunities.“CUSE workshops and advising are designed to encourage undergraduates to think about their own unique interests and goals and assist students in developing meaningful research projects and experiences,” Mikuljan said.The two workshops CUSE regularly offer are “Getting Started in Undergraduate Research,” which explores different kinds of research and scholarly engagement opportunities, strategies for finding a faculty mentor and developing a plan for pursuit of such interests and goals, and “Crafting a Strong Grant Proposal,” which walks students through funding sources at Notre Dame, the components of a grant application and a composing an effective grant proposal, Mikuljan said.Student programming coordinator for CUSE, Kati Schuler, said the workshops welcome students from all majors and grade levels every week.“If you’re not quite sure where to begin exploring research and engagement opportunities at Notre Dame, ‘Getting Started in Undergraduate Research’ is the right workshop for you,” Schuler said. “If you have a specific project planned and would like to start the process of securing funding, ‘How to Write a Strong Grant Proposal’ would be the best.”Since 2012, CUSE has offered about 35 workshops annually that are open to all undergraduate students, Schuler said. The workshops are typically held in Brownson Hall.“We also bring our workshops into classes if a professor requests it,” Schuler said. “For example, in 2016–2017, 130 students attended the workshops held in the CUSE office, but we saw another 245 students during in-class workshops.”Outside of workshops, Schuler said CUSE offers individual mentoring and advising to students pursuing scholarly engagement outside of class. Students can make an appointment with an advisor to discuss their project plans and get help on drafting a proposal, she said.“CUSE can also help students connect to all of the various centers, institutes and resources on campus,” Schuler said. “We work like a compass, helping to guide you through all of the different opportunities at Notre Dame.”Mikuljan said CUSE is currently in the process of developing a grant writing series to provide more hands-on assistance during the grant writing process.“CUSE is always working to create new and better workshops and resources to help students be successful in their research and scholarly endeavors,” Mikuljan said. “Undergraduate students of every level and every college and discipline participate in a range for research activities at Notre Dame, around the country and abroad.”Sophomore anthropology major Dayonni Phillips said she attended CUSE workshops to learn how to write a grant after being invited to do research in Ireland and attend a field school in Poland.“I would definitely recommend students attend CUSE workshops or get involved with CUSE even if they do not have research plans,” Phillips said. “Although the CUSE workshop was meant to teach students how to organize a general grant proposal, I felt like the instructor was interested in specific questions that students had pertaining to their personal grants, and he would then address those questions as well.”Tags: CUSE, Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement, grant proposal, grant writinglast_img read more

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Notre Dame community reflects on life of Sister Mary McNamara

first_imgAs a Sister of the Incarnate Word, Sister Mary McNamara proclaimed the Gospel of love by bonding in community.And at Notre Dame, she found that community in the form of her dream job: being the rector of Breen-Phillips (BP) Hall.Serving as the Breen-Phillips community’s rector was the most fulfilling ministry of her life, Dillon Hall rector Fr. Paul Doyle said.“She expected to be in the ministry a lot longer, but never to take on another one: This was going to be it for her,” Doyle said. “She called it her dream job.” Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Candles at the Grotto spell out ‘Sr. Mary’ in honor of Sister Mary McNamara, the rector of Breen-Phillips Hall who died recently. Acquaintances described McNamara as a a gifted teacher with a sense of humor.Sister McNamara died Feb. 7 due to complications from a stroke, according to an email sent to students by vice president of student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding. She was 67.Senior Nhi Vu, a resident assistant (RA) in Breen-Phillips Hall who attended Sister McNamara’s funeral in her hometown of Cleveland on Tuesday, was touched to learn that although Sister McNamara only spent six years at Notre Dame, she considered them to be some of the best years of her life.“When we went to Cleveland, everybody was just saying that being a rector was her dream job, it was her favorite job, she loved Notre Dame so much, she loved this, this was her favorite ministry,” Vu said. “And [they said] just how big of a role we actually were and how seriously she took her job and how much she loved us and just all the life and sass and soul she brought to BP.”Attending the funeral, Vu said, enlightened her and the rest of the BP community to the many other ministries Sister McNamara undertook throughout her life, including mentoring people from at-risk communities, such as the mentally disabled and those reintegrating into society after spending time in prison.“She was very interesting. The more we keep learning about her and hearing the other stories, the more we keep learning about who she is,” Vu said. “We know her mostly just from being our rector and that’s just like, the very top of the hierarchy. We always respected her a lot and saw her in that authority role, and I think working with her, as closely as we did as seniors and now hall staff, we slowly learned so much more about it.”Sister McNamara, who celebrated her Golden Jubilee as a Sister of the Incarnate Word in 2017, was a loyal Cleveland native and sports fan, a teacher in the Moreau First Year Experience course and an avid Notre Dame women’s basketball fan — a fact the team recognized by honoring her on the video board in Purcell Pavilion during its Feb. 11 game.Senior and Breen-Phillips RA Kaitlyn Keffler said the outpouring of love for Sister McNamara from the Notre Dame community in the wake of her death, as well as at her funeral, demonstrated how many lives Sister McNamara touched.“It’s made me at least realize just how lucky we were and lucky we are to have known her,” Keffler said. “Like I said, she has our BP community and then the greater Notre Dame community — so that’s one family — and then I’ve met her two families: Her biological family and then her Sisters of the Incarnate Word are both amazing. So that’s at least three, I’m sure there are more people out there.”One member of Sister McNamara’s extended family the BP community has rallied around is Sister Mary Jane Hahner, the rector of Pasquerilla West Hall (PDub) and Sister McNamara’s best friend.“We had the initial stage of grief and then the ‘How’s Sister MJ?’” Breen-Phillips Hall Assistant Rector (AR) Erin Daugherty said. “Because they were inseparable. Absolutely inseparable. And Sister Mary Mac would always just refer to her as her buddy. ‘I’ll see you guys later, I’m going to catch up with my buddy.’”Doyle said he admired the close bond between Sister McNamara and Hahner.“Fr. Bob Loughery of Sorin Hall was over at Cleveland for the [funeral] events over there, and at the wake service he observed to everybody … that he wanted to thank MJ for showing the rest of us what a true friendship was alongside of Mary,” Doyle said. “The two of them saw each other as best friends, but there was an openness in their friendship for including the rest of us.”Along with Flaherty Hall rector Sister Mary Donnelly, Sister McNamara and Hahner called themselves “the Golden Girls.” This friendship started with a shared sense of humor and love for basketball, Hahner explained, but developed into a relationship in which both women could be completely vulnerable.“I always felt at home because I was free to be myself — the good parts and the bad parts — and hopefully I allowed her to have that freedom, too,” she said. “We told each other that we loved one another every day, just about. … And we weren’t ashamed of saying that to one another. And that’s a tremendous gift, to be able to find that and have a relationship that develops that wide.”BP senior Courtney Koch said Sister McNamara’s competitive side emerged in her friendship with Hahner.“I was a captain of the Fisher Regatta and Sister Mary would always come watch us,” she said. “She would always just cheer for BP to beat PDub because she couldn’t let her buddy win, so we had to beat her buddy.”This competitive streak, Hahner said, extended to many aspects of Sister McNamara’s life.“I needed this spice and she said, ‘I’ll bring it over,’ and I said, ‘No, you don’t have to bring it over, I’ll come over and get it,’” she said. “She said, ‘No, I’ll bring it over. I’m gonna beat you,’ and she hung up. And with that … I raced out of here and we met in Siegfried in the circle. Both of us were gasping for air because we tried to run, and we were laughing so hard.”Laughter followed Sister McNamara, Doyle said.“I don’t know that I have words to describe it, but she made funny things happen and laughed at appropriate times — she was just alive,” he said.Daugherty said one of Sister McNamara’s signature habits was telling a joke to start her welcome speech before each hall Mass in BP.“She had an absolutely wonderful sense of humor, whether it was in staff meetings or she always opened Mass with a joke that had something to do with the readings,” Daugherty said. “And I don’t know where she’d get these things from but they were absolutely hilarious and you’re just like ‘I can’t believe she just said that at Mass but it’s pretty awesome.’”Senior Anne Vieser, a BP RA, said the opening joke at Mass was Sister McNamara’s favorite part of her job.“I do remember always appreciating those tidbits because it just boils everything down,” she said. “And then Fr. Pete [McCormick, director of Campus Ministry], I think it was, was saying that more than half the times that he came to say Mass, Sister would steal whatever message he was going to give in his homily at the beginning. So then he’d have to come up with something else to focus on.”Sister McNamara’s ability to tie a joke into a teaching about the Gospel, Hahner said, was indicative of her natural propensity for teaching.“She was a born teacher, and she did that in everything. If she was supposed to say the prayer for, like, rector training, she went online and she would get something that was comical and then would tie it in,” Hahner said. “ … So she would take that joke, and then she would interpret the Gospel as only a good teacher really could. And she loved teaching Moreau because it was about Notre Dame; it was about life; it was about relationships; it was about healthy living.”Junior Ryan Green, a student in one of Sister McNamara’s first Moreau classes, said her enthusiasm for the course was contagious.“She seemed to have such a good attitude that you couldn’t help but participate and want to be there,” Green said. “It wasn’t like she had these crazy activities, we didn’t go travel the universe in the Magic School Bus or anything like that, but she just — her attitude, I thought, was contagious. … She had such an easy way of making things enjoyable, making people happy.”Her ability to have a positive impact on so many different aspects of Notre Dame in a relatively short time, Keffler said, speaks to Sister McNamara’s ability to lead.“After these last couple weeks, I’ve seen just how many lives she’s touched through her Moreau class, and the other rectors and obviously Sister MJ and all the PDub girls have a special place,” she said. “I mean, everyone in the administration, even. She was a rector for six years, but she’s definitely made an impact and helped mentor a lot of those rectors as well.”One of the biggest examples of Sister McNamara’s leadership was her role in BP’s adoption of an “honorary Babe” last year, Daugherty said.“I think one of the biggest impacts [she had] was her intense desire for everyone in the community to band together, and to band together about things that were outside of themselves,” she said. “So last year, we had an honorary Babe who was a little girl who was really sick, and she actually ended up passing away over the summer. But [Sister McNamara] singlehandedly motivated the entire dorm to write letters to her, write a joke book, to visit her — things like that. … She really pushed people to try and look outside themselves and to see what not only they individually [could] do, but what a group of strong women could do for someone else.”Hahner said Sister McNamara’s faith in the power of women was a core tenant of her beliefs.“You know, she was always very strong for women, and she’s the one who taught me ‘A-men and A-women’ — that there should be an equality in our church, in our world for men and women; that as long as respect was there, life was worth living,” Hahner said.Sister McNamara did not limit her quest for justice to only women. Vieser said everything Sister McNamara did was driven by a desire for justice.“The thing that kept coming up was her favorite beatitude was, ‘Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for justice, for they shall be satisfied,’” she said. “And I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, this all makes sense,’ everything she did in her life was for that end. That wouldn’t be something she necessarily shared with us, that that was her favorite beatitude, but I think knowing that now, it all makes sense.”This ultimate goal, Hahner said, spoke to her conviction as a member of the Sisters of the Incarnate Word.“She was a Sister of the Incarnate Word, first and foremost, and that means that she was bringing the Jesus to people, and she would be like, ‘What would Jesus do? What would Mary Mac do?’ because it was usually right,” she said. “You know, God was really important in her life, and so are God’s people.”Keffler said Sister McNamara’s care for others is something everyone in the BP community is trying to keep in mind despite her absence.“She was always telling us to look out for each other and, you know, ‘Best People, Best Place,’ so we still have to live up to that,” Keffler said. “I think that’s something that she truly believed in, and that’s part of the reason why we’re doing OK right now at least.”Sister McNamara would be proud to see the way BP has rallied around each other during their time of loss, Hahner said.“They were her girls,” she said. “ … She was just really very, very proud to be their rector and to live among them, and she considered them a gift from God. And they are.”Aside from the day-to-day tasks of a rector, Koch said, the hardest adjustment for the BP residents has been not being able to turn to Sister McNamara in times of need.“I think the biggest thing is getting used to the fact that she’s not around anymore,” Koch said. “You’d always see her door open and you would pop in and say ‘hi’ or things like that.”While the hall will not be the same, however, Vu said she knows Sister McNamara has not left it behind.“Everyone can feel that BP just feels so empty and different without her, but we still know that she’s watching over us and is still with us,” she said.Doyle said although he misses having Sister McNamara here with him, no one would “begrudge her a trip to where she’s gone.”“[Tuesday] night when we drove back from Cleveland, I was with MJ and Pat Kincaid of Knott Hall, and I said ‘What I would like right now is for Mary to be in the fourth seat here in the car and just telling us about all that she has experienced in the last two weeks, including heaven, you know?’” Doyle said. “I don’t think we look for replacements, we look for successors. Mary was Mary and we were blessed.”In the end, though, Hahner said, perhaps no one felt more blessed than Sister McNamara herself while she was at the University.“We would look up at the Dome and she would say, ‘J, we’re at Notre Dame,’” Hahner said. “ … She didn’t ever cry, but — not never, but she cried at things that were important. And she would always fill up, and she said that — looking at Our Lady — and said that it was the best job she ever had and that she hoped that it would be her last job in ministry. And God took her up on it.”Tags: Breen-Phillips Hall, Sister Mary McNamara, Sisters of the Incarnate Wordlast_img read more

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Liturgical seamstress celebrates 20 years of service at Basilica of the Sacred Heart

first_imgFor the last 20 years, Patti Schlarb has served as the liturgical seamstress for the Basilica of the Sacred Heart — a role that has not only brought her across campus, but across the globe as well.In her role as liturgical seamstress, Schlarb is responsible for handcrafting the vestments and other decor for the Basilica and all the chapels on campus. Not only does she make items for Notre Dame, she also covers the needs of the University of Portland and the Holy Cross Missions in Chile, Uganda, Kenya and Mexico.But her work does not stop there.“I also am sailing on the seven seas, because I’ve made albs for the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan [which] used to have a C.S.C. chaplain … I’m all over the world,” Schlarb said.Liturgical seamstress Patti Schlarb has been handcrafting religious vestments for the Basilica and campus chapels for the past 20 years.Before coming to work at Notre Dame, Schlarb ran her own tailoring business for 20 years.“It just so happened that one of my clients that I had at my tailoring business was Fr. [Peter] Rocca’s secretary, and Brother Dennis Meyers who used to be here asked her if she knew anybody that sewed. So, she gave him my name,” Schlarb said.After three job interviews, during which Schlarb said she “was scared to death,” she started working at the Basilica. After 20 years in the position, Schlarb estimated she has made up to 100 vestments and 5,000 albs, on top of numerous other projects.Currently, Schlarb is right in the middle of her “busy season,” — preparing for Easter celebrations.“It’s one of those things I just have to keep going on each project that I work on, and I do it kind of like in a piece by piece,” she said. “I get one vestment done, I get the altar cloth done and I check them off my list. So as my time goes on, it usually takes me about 12 weeks to get ready for Easter.”After finishing her work for Easter, she then moves on to preparations for Holy Cross priestly ordinations.“We have five that are going to be ordained this year, so I have five vestments to make for them, and they’re all custom-made for each one of them — and yes, they take them with them, and they take them all over the world, no matter where they’re at,” she said. “I find it’s kind of a privilege because I basically go along with them wherever they are. It’s a good feeling for the ministry to do that.”Schlarb said not many people think of all the work that occurs behind the scenes in preparation for the different celebrations.“It’s very busy, and I think that most people don’t realize that everything is made here at the Basilica,” she said. “They just think that they open up a catalog and they buy it and it just appears, but that’s not the way it is. Everything that I make here is very unique, and is designed for the Basilica … I do a lot of things that nobody knows that I do. And even when somebody needs a button sewed on, I do that, too.”Her favorite part of working at the Basilica, she said, is working with the seminarians.“Seeing them come in … they really don’t know what’s going on, and by the time they become priests, they have grown so much and accomplished so much and it’s almost like I’m a proud mama, because they are like my children,” Schlarb said. “Because I’ve seen them for the last 10 years of becoming a priest. It’s very gratifying for me.”Schlarb said one of the most memorable moments from her years working as the liturgical seamstress was when she was given the opportunity to make the vestments used for the inaugural Mass of Fr. John Jenkins as president of the University.“He allowed me to go in and help vest him, and he signed a program for me and took pictures,“ Schlarb said. “I felt very very blessed doing that.”Schlarb’s work has even been worn by recipients of the Laetare Medal.“Four years ago the President’s Office called me and wanted me to design a ribbon that they could put [the Laetare Medal] on so they could put it around the neck like they do the congressional medals … so I designed that, and it’s now a tradition that they use that every year for the Laetare medal,“ she said. ”And the first two that were given out was Vice President Biden and House Speaker Boehner. They both have one of my ribbons.”Schlarb said she feels blessed to have worked at the Basilica for 20 years.“I know my business very well. It’s a very gratifying job, I’m not the type of person that needs a pat on the back,” Schlarb said. “I know what I do, and I know the quality of work that I do, and just to be at Mass and to see my creations and how much everybody enjoys it — that’s my gratitude that I get back. … I love my job. You can tell that. I do. I love what I do, and there aren’t too many people that say that they love their job. I really do love it.”Tags: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, liturgical seamstress, Patti Schlarblast_img read more

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SGA, RHA join efforts in hosting lip sync battle

first_imgPaths between the Student Government Association (SGA) and Residence Hall Association (RHA) may not cross often in everyday campus life, but they came together to throw a lip sync battle Wednesday.Big Belle Little Belle co-chair and senior Moira LeMay said the battle, co-sponsored by Big Belle Little Bell and RHA, was created “to give girls something to do after classes, take a break from studying and just hang out.”RHA co-president of events Lucia O’Quinn said she knew Big Belle Little Belle had an interest in hosting an event featuring singing. Sine RHA typically hosts a karaoke event, the senior thought to combine the two groups’ ideas.“Big Belle Little Belle, they wanted to do something for their bigs and their littles, and I was thinking for RHA karaoke we did something 90s themed, and this event just became a kind of 90s themed lip sync battle type thing,” she said. O’Quinn found that the event was an instrumental step to “getting RHA and SGA to work together.”“I hope that people realize that even though we’re two separate organizations, we really work together because there had been problems in the past between them,” O’Quinn said.LeMay said the event was “something [they] might want to do [again] later on.”Big Belle Little Belle has around 200 members, so committee organizers worked to make sure they had the appropriate space to accommodate their lip sync battles, Big Belle Little Belle co-chair Sarah Austin said.“We had it in [Carroll Auditorium] so that we can give an opportunity for the bigs and the littles to come to an event together,” the junior said. “In general the space was really good for us just because we have a really large club and we couldn’t predict how many girls would come. So in the event that they all did come, they’d fill the seats.”The event started with an icebreaker, and once the girls were ready to battle, prizes were theirs to win.“We started off with a group dance, so we did the Cupid Shuffle. That way a lot of girls felt comfortable getting up because if we’re being goofy they feel like they can be goofy, too,” Austin said. Prizes for winners included large makeup bags, blankets, face masks, beauty products, coffee mugs and gift cards for Uber, Starbucks and Chick-Fil-A. “I really enjoyed seeing the bigs and littles coming together,” Austin said. “[One little and big pair] did matching shirts and [performed] ‘You’ve got a friend in me’ from Toy Story, and had a little dance together. It was really cute, so seeing them making friends, interacting with the other girls were really good.”Competitors were not limited to big and little pairs. Some of the committee members performed as well. Committee members from SGA and RHA reiterated their joint effort of the event by performed together. By the end of the night, O’Quinn said the event was meant to be a place for students to let go of work and have an enjoyable evening.“I think just that it’s a place for inclusivity for all students and just to have fun,” she said. “You know it’s not just all about school work and college, you have to have some type of social life.”Tags: Big Belle Little Belle, Lip Sync Battle, Residence Hall Association, Saint Mary’s College, Student Government Associationlast_img read more

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Wendel To Update Public On COVID-19 At 4 p.m. Press Conference

first_imgWatch us LIVE at WNYNewsNow.com/live MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County Executive Paul Wendel, Jr. will update the public on the evolving COVID-19 situation at a press conference today, Sunday March 15, at 4 p.m.The press conference will be streamed live on WNYNewsNow Facebook page.Wendel will be joined by Commissioner of Health and Human Services Christine Schuyler, Sheriff James Quattrone, and Director of Emergency Services John Griffith. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),About time the sound of silence coming from mayville has been deafening.last_img read more

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COVID-19 Cases Continue To Rise In County, 19 New Cases Reported

first_imgMGN ImageMAYVILLE — Chautauqua County health officials report 19 new positive COVID-19 cases in the county Thursday, bringing the active cases total to 120.The location breakdown of the new cases is as follows:Dunkirk, 5; Forestville, 1; Fredonia, 2; Jamestown, 6; Falconer, 1; Frewsburg, 1; Lakewood, 2 and Ripley 1.Tanglewood Manor faces 66 active cases, with 55 residents and 11 employees reported as positive. County officials note none of the people associated with the Tanglewood outbreak have recovered yet. To date there are 698 recovered cases, 13 deaths and 831 total confirmed cases.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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