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MPs breathe life into corporate killing law

first_imgA renewed drive to establish the offence of corporate killing is to belaunched today by MPs from the three main political parties. Andrew Dismore, Labour MP for Hendon, is proposing amendments to theCriminal Justice Bill, designed to get the issue back on the political agenda.He is being backed by unions, safety organisations and fellow MPs. The Government has been promising to introduce the law since 1997, whichwill make it possible to find corporate bodies guilty of manslaughter. A regulatory impact assessment of the proposed law is being carried out, andLord Bassam of Brighton, speaking in the House of Lords, said the Governmentintends to table legislation as soon as it is finished. The changes are being backed by the TUC, Centre for Corporate Accountabilityand pressure group Disaster Action, which are launching a report today on whythe new offence is necessary, to coincide with the meeting of ministers. Owen Tudor, TUC senior policy officer, said: “We hope to create debatein the House of Commons so the amount of support for it will be evident to theGovernment.” A recent report by the HSE said a new offence of corporate killing would actas a powerful deterrent to prevent needless injuries and deaths. However, Diane Sinclair, CIPD lead adviser on public policy, has doubts overthe effectiveness of the proposed law, because companies should already beabiding by health and safety regulations and protecting staff. “Does highlighting bad practice improve others’ practice?” sheasked. Sinclair added that the law already provides for unlimited fines where theyare warranted, as well as the imprisonment of directors and others found to beindividually liable. Comments are closed. MPs breathe life into corporate killing lawOn 11 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Rhodes Must Fall in Oxford: Live Blog

first_img[mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%12321%%[/mm-hide-text] 12.33 After some technical difficulties, we’re back online! Organisers are reading out a statement of solidapurity from RMF in South Africa.[mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%12320%%[/mm-hide-text] 11.59 University security car arriving shortly before the protest.[mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%12319%%[/mm-hide-text] 11.53 We’re just heading over to Oriel Square now to follow the protest. After a statue of infamous colonialist Cecil Rhodes was removed from the university of Cape Town earlier this year, the Rhodes Must Fall campaign has reached Oxford, and nearly 2,000 people have signed a petition demanding that Oriel take down what they perceive to be a glorification of an architect of apartheid.last_img read more

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A GORDIAN KNOT By Jim Redwine

first_img GAVEL GAMUT By Jim RedwineA GORDIAN KNOTPerhaps we need to channel Alexander the Great (356 – 323 B.C.) to help us address our Gordian Knot type problem of child welfare. You will recall Alexander eschewed the niceties of trying to unravel the problem step by laborious step and simply slashed through the morass of hemp with his sword. A tempting approach to any complicated puzzle but probably of little lasting benefit.As we know from experience, every complicated situation can be papered over with a simple, wrong answer. We naturally yearn for quick and cheap solutions but these never cure the “disease” and often result in fatalities. That is what the former Indiana State Department of Children’s Services Director Mary Beth Bonaventura pointed out in her letter of resignation. She told Governor Eric Holcomb our current failure to adequately fund and analyze our child welfare needs will, “[A]ll but ensure children will die.”And while this dramatic statement grabs our attention, what former Judge Bonaventura did not say was that Indiana child welfare is not just a DCS problem; it involves numerous other state and county level agencies such as courts, prosecutor offices, police departments, healthcare providers, schools, and several others in addition to families, immediate and extended.I have plenty to do as Posey Circuit Court Judge when it comes to children who have need of or who use up taxpayer provided services. While I know we must approach this crisis of Children in Need of Services from all angles, I also know all hard problems call for careful, incremental approaches. So I will stay within my jurisdiction and address how the Judicial branch of government could help if the Legislative and Executive branches assist us to.First let me give you an idea of how most Indiana courts, especially in small counties, must address the needs of families. Posey County has two judges. We divide all legal matters in such a way about half of the cases go to each court. The Circuit Court hears the Child in Need of Services cases. Frequently a family in DCS cases consists of one mother, two or more children and two or more fathers.These are critical matters. Children may be at physical or mental risk, parents may be at risk of losing their children and the DCS has the duty to protect everyone’s interests while the Court must protect everyone’s rights. Each parent needs an attorney and in every case a Guardian Ad Litem must be appointed by the Court to concentrate on the children’s interests. Of course, wealthy people rarely are inconvenienced by such legal matters so the taxpayers must provide. You can readily see where we are headed.This scenario also calls for Family Case Managers, police officers, mental and medical professionals, court personnel and a courtroom with lights, heat, recording equipment, etc.Okay, I know this is exhausting. However, there is no Gordian Knot solution. It comes down to hard, complicated and expensive work. On the other hand, what could be more important?FOOTNOTE: For more Gavel Gamut articles go to www.jamesmredwine.comFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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IS IT TRUE JUNE 20,2017

first_imgIS IT TRUE that every once in a while a comment that is so funny and true is left on the City County Observer and yesterday was such a day?…in response to the idiotic design of a street that was 6 inches too narrow and in need of a supplemental pour of concrete CCO poster Delta Bravo contributed the following words of wit:“RE: Lane width issues on North Main…I honestly doubt it was inability to read a ruler that caused this issue. I blame the ‘real-world’ traffic studies which were no doubt were conducted prior to final planning and implementation. Any reasonable traffic observer in Jimtown would conclude that average traffic loading on North Main (per block) consists of 2-3 scooters and 1 stolen bicycle. Include a 36″ safety margin to account for an abandoned shopping cart on the side of the road or an enhanced collapse zone for the vacant, burned out houses lining the street, and there you have it…”IS IT TRUE that Delta Bravo was seconded and supplemented by a few other posters on the local flavor of North Main from the torn down restaurants to the width of an arse moving through Evansville while straddling a scooter?…this particular oversight and the need to do a repair is comical and almost flies in the face of logic?…we wonder who in the heck in a position of knowledge and responsibility would get the width of a road wrong in modern day America where everything in life is predetermined or legislated?…the answer is the same moronic bureaucracy that messed up the base paths on a little league field and pour concrete too thick for a truck to get under an existing bridge?…the real insult to Evansville taxpayers is that the project is still asserted to be under budget?…the powers that be must have budgeted to mess something up big time?…there is nothing like coming home and bragging about buying a $30 item for $45 when you budgeted $50?…some folks are dumb enough to believe they saved $5 for such a fiasco?…so goes the public works in Evansville, Indiana?IS IT TRUE there was one project that got done according to budget with very few snafus and that was the Ford Center?…the Ford Center was budgeted to spend $127.5 Million borrowed dollars and it exactly achieved its goal?…all was well at the corner of Main Street and MLK Boulevard until it was opened for business?…the wheels fell off of the bus known as Ford Center when it came time to manage it to the pro forma that it was sold on?…the building that Jon Boy built was advertised to break even and cover its cost in the first year but now in the 6thyear it is still draining the taxpayer coffers by $10 Million per year?…that losing that much money would make the Ford Center worth a NEGATIVE $100 Million Dollars in a financial valuation report?…The City of Evansville spent $127.5 Million on a building that loses $10 Million per year?…that is pretty darn hard to do?…we shall see how the subsidy hotel does when the numbers come out?…we may all be glad that the taxpayers don’t own any of the Doubletree for the $20 Million investment because it may come with a capital call attached to it?…the Ford Center is the gift that keeps on taking?Todays “READERS POLL” question is: Do you feel that someone should be held accountable for the major mistake made in redesigning the $18 million dollar North Main project?EDITORS FOOTNOTE:  Any comments posted in this column doesn’t represents the views or opinions of our advertisers.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Christmas cheer

first_imgSilly season has arrived in force. For evidence, you need look no further than The Herald in Scotland, which reported on another town collectively embracing its inner loon.The United Parish of Carstairs in Lanarkshire is to be renamed Bethlehem for 24 hours, and nearby Carstairs Junction will be signposted Nazareth (yes, the council is in on this), as part of a day-long winter festival organised by one Rev Alan Gibson. He is taking the Christmas message to the streets on the back of camels in order to win back dwindling congregations.And the inevitable bakery angle? Chocolate wafer maker Tunnock’s has baked up a batch of 2,000 wafers, relabelled from “caramel” to “camel”, to hand out in the streets. Let’s hope it brings winter cheer not least to Tunnock’s itself, which was beset by staff strikes this year.last_img read more

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Press release: £950 fine for Leicester man fishing with unlicensed rod and line

first_imgA 28-year old man from Burton Overy, Leicester has been successfully prosecuted after being found guilty of fishing with an unlicensed rod and line in May 2018.The case was brought to Wellingborough Magistrates Court by the Environment Agency on 12 November 2018 where Sam Kirk, of Scotland Lane, Burton Overy, was proved guilty in his absence and ordered to pay a total penalty of £957.The penalty includes a fine of £220 plus costs of £737 after Kirk was found in possession of an unlicensed fishing instrument, namely rod and line, with the intention of using it for fishing on 5 May 2018 at Beedles Lake, East Goscote, Leicester, contrary to Section 27(1)(b) of the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975.Following the verdict, Pete Haslock, Fisheries Enforcement Team Leader for the Environment Agency said: Anyone who suspects anglers of illegal fishing are urged to contact the Environment Agency’s 24/7 hotline on 0800 807060, or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111. We take all kinds of illegal fishing extremely seriously – whether it’s those fishing without a licence, or licensed anglers using illegal equipment. This case shows anglers how seriously the courts take these offences and we hope it will act as a deterrent to other anglers who flout the laws. Illegal fishing is not fair on other anglers who fish within the law, and it also endangers the future of the sport by damaging the sustainability of fish stocks. We regularly carry out enforcement operations to protect fish stocks and improve fisheries and urge anyone who has any information about any incidents of illegal fishing to report them to us so we can investigate.last_img read more

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Two Magpies Bakery sales expected to soar to £2.5m

first_imgSales at Suffolk-based Two Magpies Bakery have soared following the opening of two more sites over the past year.The business, which launched in 2013, had a turnover of £720k in 2018, is expecting sales to hit £2.5m by the end of this year.It expanded beyond its initial Southwold café/bakery site last September by buying a second bakery in Aldeburgh. In April this year it opened a third site in Darsham, which now houses production and a bakery school.Founder Rebecca Bishop, who runs the business with husband Steve Magnall, said Aldeburgh had rapidly exceeded expectations, becoming the most profitable bakery in the group and serving more than 70 covers a day. Darsham, meanwhile, has a good passing trade and a regular customer base.“Our three bakeries are allowing us to produce more bakes and serve more customers and in six months we’ve gone from 18 covers in Southwold to over 100 across the three sites,” said Magnall.“At the new Darsham site we are able to bake more and run our popular cookery school courses, which allows us to concentrate on serving customers and selling more baked goods through our three cafes.”The Two Magpies product range includes long-fermented breads, hand-laminated pastries and cakes. The business also produces vegan options and hosts pizza nights.last_img read more

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Tokyo Games offer Playbooks to assure athletes, sway public

first_imgTOKYO (AP) — Tokyo organizers and the IOC have begun rolling out “Playbooks” to detail how 15,400 athletes will enter Japan for the Olympics on July 23 and the Paralympics a month later. These are the first versions and details are still in flux. The documents will be updated in April and June. Athletes and others will be kept in a bubble at the Athletes Village. Potential spectators and the media will be outside the bubble. The Playbooks spell out strict behavior in regard to entering Japan and leaving the country. They deal with hygiene, testing, immigration questions and behavior that will prohibit athletes from any tourism.last_img read more

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Christopher Sieber Steps Into Matilda as Miss Trunchbull

first_img Sieber garnered Tony Award nominations for Spamalot and Shrek the Musical. His additional Broadway credits include Pippin (which he recently briefly returned to with his injured hand), La Cage aux Folles, Into the Woods, Thoroughly Modern Millie, Triumph of Love, Chicago and Beauty and the Beast. His film and TV credits include Two of a Kind, Pushing Daisies, The Good Wife, Elementary and It’s All Relative. Christopher Sieber The cast is off, so let the child-hurling begin! Tony nominee Christopher Sieber steps into Matilda as the frightening Miss Trunchbull on April 18. As previously reported, Sieber, who was originally scheduled to begin performances on March 18, delayed his start date twice after fracturing a bone in his hand during rehearsal. Sieber takes over from Ben Thompson in the role. Star Files View Comments Happy first night, Mr. Sieber! We’d say break a leg, but, uh, now might not be the best time.center_img Matilda also currently stars Paige Brady, Gabriella Pizzolo, Ripley Sobo and Ava Ulloa in the title role, Jill Paice as Miss Honey, Matt Harrington as Mr. Wormwood, Lesli Margherita as Mrs. Wormwood and Karen Aldridge as Mrs. Phelps. Matilda Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 1, 2017 Related Showslast_img read more

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GMEDC Names New Executive Director

first_imgJoan Goldstein has been named the new Executive Director of Green Mountain Economic Development Corporation (GMEDC). Goldstein comes to the position after several years as a Business and Technology Advisor for the Vermont Small Business Development Center and as an adjunct accounting, economics, and small business management instructor for Community College of Vermont and the Vermont Technical College.  Joan previously conducted business for herself as an eBay selling consultant and she also brings a wide perspective from her 20 plus years in the financial services industry with international sales, marketing, client and project management experience. She has an MBA in Finance and an undergraduate degree in Economics.Her predecessor, Neal Fox, has left to pursue his many other interests, including serving on the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee of GMEDC.GMEDC is a nonprofit corporation committed to the development of businesses and communities of the 33 town region of the Upper Valley of Vermont. This area entails Orange and Northern Windsor Counties. If you want to hear more about the services and programs of GMEDC, please call 802-295-3710 or visit out website at www.gmedc.com(link is external).last_img read more

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