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Watch Roosevelt Collier Lead Members Of Snarky Puppy, Dopapod, & Kung Fu At Brooklyn Comes Alive

first_imgLast year marked the second annual Brooklyn Comes Alive festival, mixing over 50 musicians in unique super-group formations across three venues in Brooklyn. The highly anticipated urban festival hosted a very exciting edition of Roosevelt Collier’s New York Get Down, with the renowned pedal steel guitarist welcoming Michael League (Snarky Puppy), Adrian Tramontano (Kung Fu), Eli Winderman (Dopapod) and Rob Compa (Dopapod) for a jam session for the ages. Their performance was beyond tight, with the group eventually also being joined by Jackson Kincheloe of Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds. Following Kincheloe’s sit-in, the all-star crew moved into a stellar rendition of  “Hottentot,” a classic written by John Scofield. Check out footage of “Hottentot” below, courtesy of MKDevo.You can scope the full setlist from this super jam, below.Setlist: Roosevelt Collier’s New York Get Down ft. Michael League, Adrian Tramontano, Eli Winderman and Rob Compa at Brooklyn Comes Alive, Brooklyn, NY – 10/22/16Churchin, Spank-A-Lee, Don’t Keep Me Wondering*, Hottentot, Weird Fishes/Arpeggi, Rampage, Foxy Lady* w/ Jackson Kincheloe of Sister Sparrow & The Dirty BirdsThe 2017 Brooklyn Comes Alive lineup features members of Umphrey’s McGee, moe., The Disco Biscuits, The String Cheese Incident, Trey Anastasio Band, and so many more. Iconic legends, such as John Scofield, George Porter Jr., Cyril Neville, DJ Premier, Johnny Vidacovich, and Henry Butler, will join members of nationally touring bands, such as GRAMMY-winners Snarky Puppy, The Meters, Primus, Soulive, Lettuce, The Motet, Lotus, Railroad Earth, The Infamous Stringdusters,Yonder Mountain String Band, The Russ Liquid Test, SunSquabi, Pendulum, Destroid, The Crystal Method, Midnight North, Aqueous, Kung Fu, Electric Beethoven, and more. Check out the full lineup of artists below, and stay tuned for upcoming announcements about bands, supergroup formations, and special tribute sets.***Tickets Are On Sale Now!***Each ticket grants attendees in-and-out access to all three venues, creating the feeling of an indoor music festival all within the heart of Williamsburg. In true Brooklyn Comes Alive-fashion, a brunch set will kick off the music each day, and performances will continue into the early hours of the morning with special late-night performances.To find out more about ticketing, VIP options, and lodging, head to the festival website.last_img read more

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Nobel laureate Hubel dies at 87

first_imgHarvard Medical School Professor David H. Hubel, whose discoveries in visual processing and development ushered in the modern study of the cerebral cortex and changed the way childhood cataracts and strabismus (“cross-eye”) were treated, died on Sept. 22 of kidney failure in Lincoln, Mass. He was 87.Hubel, the John Enders Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus, and longtime research partner Torsten Wiesel shared half of the 1981 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for their groundbreaking insights into the structure and function of the visual cortex and the importance of exposure to certain visual stimuli shortly after birth for normal vision development. (The other half of that year’s prize went to Roger Sperry for finding that the two hemispheres of the brain have specialized functions.)“David was one of the great scientists of his generation,” said Michael Greenberg, Nathan Marsh Pusey Professor of Neurobiology and chair of the Department of Neurobiology at HMS. “His work revealed how the brain is organized to produce visual perception. The insights we have gained from his discoveries resonate to all aspects of sensory perception. Not only were his experimental findings revolutionary, David was also a passionate teacher and a talented communicator. Everyone in the field of neurobiology has been inspired by his achievements.”A memorial service will be held at the Memorial Church on Nov. 16 at 2 p.m. Interment will take place at a later date at Mount Royal Cemetery in Montreal. The HMS Department of Neurobiology will hold a celebration of Professor Hubel’s scientific achievements next spring.Memorial donations may be made to a newly established Hubel Memorial Fund.To read the full obituary, visit the HMS website.last_img read more

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From lecture to comedy sketch

first_img Samuel Fisch ’20 and Lance Oppenheim ’19 capture Arts First and the student experience of the arts on campus From the Everglades to Tribeca Improv can boost social and professional skills, students find Students see professors stand up in front of a class every day, but they don’t often see them do stand-up onstage. In spring, the Harvard College Stand Up Comic Society changed that with the first Harvard faculty comedy showcase.Faculty members and deans wrote jokes and learned how to channel their classroom expertise into a stage performance. Students from the Stand Up Comic Society coached them, helping finesse their routines.“This is eight members of faculty who are volunteering several things,” said one of the participants, Andrew Berry, a lecturer in organismic and evolutionary biology. “Their time, their effort — and their pride. Because this is inevitably going to be a case of humiliation — for a good cause.”The inaugural Faculty Lounge raised more than $2,000 for area homeless shelters, and the student group has since made it an annual event.,“Eight members of faculty … are volunteering several things. Their time, their effort — and their pride.” — Andrew Berry,Related Heard the one about the comedy writer? ‘While other kids were going out for sports teams and trading ‘Yu-Gi-Oh!’ cards, I was already a 40-year-old, fedora-wearing film snob’ center_img For more than just laughs Instagram takeover: Students highlight the arts on Harvard’s account Nell Scovell ’82 schools students in the art of joke writing The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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CUSE workshops aim to broaden undergraduate research opportunities

first_imgIn an effort to promote intellectual development, the Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) hosts workshops across campus that cater to undergraduates interested in research, scholarly engagement, creative endeavors and fellowships.Assistant director of undergraduate research, Yvonne Mikuljan, said the CUSE workshops introduce students to various kinds of research and learning experiences while offering advice about how to pursue those opportunities.“CUSE workshops and advising are designed to encourage undergraduates to think about their own unique interests and goals and assist students in developing meaningful research projects and experiences,” Mikuljan said.The two workshops CUSE regularly offer are “Getting Started in Undergraduate Research,” which explores different kinds of research and scholarly engagement opportunities, strategies for finding a faculty mentor and developing a plan for pursuit of such interests and goals, and “Crafting a Strong Grant Proposal,” which walks students through funding sources at Notre Dame, the components of a grant application and a composing an effective grant proposal, Mikuljan said.Student programming coordinator for CUSE, Kati Schuler, said the workshops welcome students from all majors and grade levels every week.“If you’re not quite sure where to begin exploring research and engagement opportunities at Notre Dame, ‘Getting Started in Undergraduate Research’ is the right workshop for you,” Schuler said. “If you have a specific project planned and would like to start the process of securing funding, ‘How to Write a Strong Grant Proposal’ would be the best.”Since 2012, CUSE has offered about 35 workshops annually that are open to all undergraduate students, Schuler said. The workshops are typically held in Brownson Hall.“We also bring our workshops into classes if a professor requests it,” Schuler said. “For example, in 2016–2017, 130 students attended the workshops held in the CUSE office, but we saw another 245 students during in-class workshops.”Outside of workshops, Schuler said CUSE offers individual mentoring and advising to students pursuing scholarly engagement outside of class. Students can make an appointment with an advisor to discuss their project plans and get help on drafting a proposal, she said.“CUSE can also help students connect to all of the various centers, institutes and resources on campus,” Schuler said. “We work like a compass, helping to guide you through all of the different opportunities at Notre Dame.”Mikuljan said CUSE is currently in the process of developing a grant writing series to provide more hands-on assistance during the grant writing process.“CUSE is always working to create new and better workshops and resources to help students be successful in their research and scholarly endeavors,” Mikuljan said. “Undergraduate students of every level and every college and discipline participate in a range for research activities at Notre Dame, around the country and abroad.”Sophomore anthropology major Dayonni Phillips said she attended CUSE workshops to learn how to write a grant after being invited to do research in Ireland and attend a field school in Poland.“I would definitely recommend students attend CUSE workshops or get involved with CUSE even if they do not have research plans,” Phillips said. “Although the CUSE workshop was meant to teach students how to organize a general grant proposal, I felt like the instructor was interested in specific questions that students had pertaining to their personal grants, and he would then address those questions as well.”Tags: CUSE, Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement, grant proposal, grant writinglast_img read more

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Georgia Guard trains at UGA

first_img“Assalamu alaikum,” or “peace be upon you,” will soon be a common greeting for a team of Georgia National Guardsmen as they learn to speak Pashto. The group will deploy to Afghanistan this May on a special mission to revitalize the war-torn country’s agriculture industry. University of Georgia agricultural experts helped arm them with the knowledge to do it. In February, 21 members of the National Guard’s 201st Agribusiness Development Team visited the UGA campus in Athens to get hands-on training from specialists with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The guardsmen learned about irrigation, crop production, pest management, soils assessment, livestock management and food storage. “This not a typical training session for us, but when the Georgia National Guard asked for help, we wanted to do all we could,” said Steve Brown, assistant dean for UGA Cooperative Extension. “While our scientists may not be experts in Afghan agriculture, the basics are the same worldwide.”Essential SkillsExperts also taught the guardsmen how to hold and care for chickens, care for a beehive, prune fruit trees and milk cows. These are essential skills for a country whose agriculture industry is decades behind those of developed countries. “Milk is a big carrier of diseases like salmonella, tuberculosis, listeria and E. coli,” said Steve Nickerson, UGA dairy scientist. “We are teaching them how to collect the milk in sanitary ways to limit the transmission of disease. They use open systems in Afghanistan to collect milk; if you handle it wrong, you could be killing kids.” The handpicked guard unit is based at Fort Gordon in Augusta, Ga., but members hail from across the state. The team consists of engineers, teachers, pesticide applicators, veterinarians, marketing experts and farmers. It also includes four UGA grads: Gary Church, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources; Carmen Benson, CAES; George McCommon, CAES and College of Veterinary Medicine; and Catherine Tait, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. “UGA provides the technical expertise and the experience for this education,” said Lt. Col. Ken Baldowski, media relations officer for the Georgia National Guard. “Afghans are using farming methods that are hundreds of years old in a soil that is depleted of all nutrients. The talent, expertise and knowledge shared with us at UGA will help us to perform this important mission.”The Mission“This is a very different mission for us,” Baldowski said. “While Georgia Guardsmen have been deployed to Afghanistan for more than 10 years, now we are arriving with technology and agricultural know-how to share with the Afghan farmers. We hope these methods and insights will help them to produce crops to feed their families and possibly to create a viable agricultural export product.” More than 80 percent of Afghanistan residents are farmers but lack the knowledge to produce viable crops and productive yields. “Afghanistan may be a high-tech battlefield,” said Col. Williams, who commands Augusta’s 201st Regional Support Group, “but its agricultural practices are like those of America’s during the 1900s, or in some cases the 1800s. And the income of its people, especially the farmers, is in terrible shape.” Thirty years of war and prolonged drought have set Afghan farmers way back, said Williams, who will lead the first of three ADT teams to Afghanistan this spring. Georgia is the 13th state to send a specialized ADT team to Afghanistan. The 201st will replace a group from Nevada when they arrive in May. “Our job will be to help the Afghans change their practices through education, mentorship and ‘easy-to-train, easy-to-sustain’ crop, livestock, water and land-management projects that fit their culture and environment,” Williams said. RebuildingPotatoes, apples, apricots, wheat and eggplant are staples for Afghan farmers. Obstacles like watershed management, lack of refrigeration, limited access to markets and quality seed sources, and transportation hurdles make rebuilding the Afghanistan agriculture industry difficult. “Our goal is to assist the government in administering these programs by mentoring them so that the government can run them,” Williams said. “Assisting the farmers and villages in creating markets for their food so they can be more self-sufficient and not dependent on foreign imports is a key component to our mission.” “Assalamu alaikum” is usually uttered with one hand over the heart to show sincerity. Although the National Guard team is being deployed, they all volunteered to be a part of this team. A sincere desire to help the Afghan people improve their farming practices and better their lives – and the future of their country – is at the heart of their mission.“Even though we are in some dangerous territory, they are good people and that is what is rewarding,” Williams said. “They are no different than us. The way things get done is through relationships. Loyalty and commitment is very important to them, as it is to us.”last_img read more

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Long Islanders Rally as Thousands Protest Police Killings in NYC, D.C.

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Ten days after a Staten Island grand jury declined to indict a white police officer in the chokehold death of an unarmed black man, thousands took to the streets across the country demanding justice for Eric Garner as well as others killed by police. In Washington D.C., demonstrators marched down historic Pennsylvania Avenue, holding signs that read “Black Lives Matter” while pleading for change in America’s justice system. Tens of thousands were also expected to descend on New York City for what could turn out to be the largest demonstration in Manhattan since the Staten Island grand jury voted against indicting the NYPD officer involved in Garner’s death. Long Islanders were also eager to let their voices be heard. About a dozen people marched peacefully in Islip from Brookwood Hall Park to Town Hall as Suffolk County police cruisers followed along. A separate rally was also held in Hempstead. “We need more peace!” chanted the Islip demonstrators, led by Rev. Bryan Greaves of Holy Church of Christ in Central Islip. “Increase the peace.” Standing on the steps of town hall, Greaves said, “today we are here for tomorrow.” The rally, he said, was meant to instill respect and peace in the community. Speaking of future generations, Greaves said, “We have a responsibility to do something to ensure their safety.” Bishop Donald Hudson of Common Ground Church in Central Islip called for federal investigators to bring charges against the officers involved in the deaths of Garner and 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., so “we can see justice and peace.” Hudson echoed comments made by Greaves, saying, “let’s make sure that we join hand-in-hand with peace. “It’s about right versus wrong,” he said, not race. Marching in Islip was Rochelle Allen, who said she came out to “show the community, law enforcement, everyone in our community that we stand together.” She also wanted to show her support for families of those who died in recent confrontations with police. “It’s important that we raise awareness and show people that we can spread peace,” Allen said, “and we can spread love and things don’t have to be the way they are.”Her mother Shirley Bennett-Allen called for change. “It’s time for us to stop all this foolishness, on both sides; as far as the cops are concerned, as far as the young men are concerned,” she said. “And when you see people acting out, we have to understand that these children know that we’re not going to try to glorify them…like there’s no fault in anything they’ve done,” she added. “But nobody deserved to die, especially if the child didn’t have a gun.”The non-indictment in the Garner case came just days after a grand jury in Ferguson decided against charging police officer Darren Wilson in Brown’s death. The decision in the Garner case was even more surprising, demonstrators have said, because the entire confrontation was caught on cell phone video. While Missouri laws allowed the prosecutor in that case to release details of the grand jury proceedings, which are secret, New York State law largely prevents the release of grand jury information. The New York Civil Liberties union on Friday sent a formal request to the judge who oversaw the Garner grand jury case asking for the public release of transcripts from the proceedings. The group also asked that any information that could lead to the identification of jurors or witnesses be redacted. “The failure to indict the officer responsible for the death of Eric Garner after the incident was clearly recorded on video has severely damaged the ability of much of the public to trust the criminal justice system and has left many wondering if black lives even matter,” NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman said in a statement. NYPD supporters plan to hold their own rally Friday at 5 p.m., according to a Facebook page called “Thank you NYPD.”last_img read more

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MasterCard provides EMV credit and debit cards to First Tech Credit Union

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr First Tech Federal Credit Union announced yesterday that it has entered a new agreement with MasterCard as its payment solution provider, according to a company release. MasterCard will offer “convenience, control and security” for First Tech’s more than 380,000 members, enabling the credit union to issue new credit and debit cards that contain EMV Chip and PIN technology.“Through this transition, we plan to be there every step of the way for our members by offering clear and concise communications while keeping them informed of the benefits MasterCard offers,” said Greg Mitchell, CEO of First Tech Federal Credit, in the release. Mitchell said that MasterCard provides First Tech’s members with card payment solutions that allow them to better manage their financial transactions, while also providing additional security.“Consumers are looking for solutions that are secure and simple. Working with MasterCard, First Tech can better provide peace of mind for members,” said John Ainsworth, Group Head, Independent Banks and Credit Unions, U.S. Markets, MasterCard, in the release.First Tech said that it plans to assist members in transitioning reoccurring payments from the previous payment solutions provider to MasterCard through its automatic billing update service. The credit union will begin distributing new cards this summer. continue reading »last_img read more

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Can you compete against a Google bank?

first_imgGoogle has officially become your competitor by getting a mortgage broker’s license and teaming up with Zillow to offer a mortgage comparison service for residents of the Golden State. This is important enough as the latest example of how technology companies are blurring the line between themselves and financial institutions.The news is of course also important because you don’t have to be Nostradamus to realize that this service is coming East real soon or that the ultimate aim of this partnership is to be a major player in the mortgage business.  Google has been low key about the announcement but Zillow’s press release is bubbling over with ambition: “This partnership allows us the unique opportunity to help borrowers by providing them with the industry’s most accurate, real-time information about home loans and mortgage lenders while simultaneously offering Zillow Group’s lenders increased reach for their businesses.”What really intrigues me is that Apple, Google and, more cautiously, Facebook are leveraging more than just their technological prowess; they are leveraging the goodwill and trust they have built up with consumers who have had nearly constant personal contact with their technology for most of their lives. Increasingly, credit unions can no longer compare themselves to banks and take comfort in the fact that they are more customer friendly. The real question is: are your members more likely to trust Apple with their money than your credit union? continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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The quickest way anywhere is a straight line

first_imgIt’s a fact…the quickest way anywhere is a straight line. So, why do credit unions seemingly insist on charting winding paths for their members and their marketers?Many times we overthink strategies and plans. We get bogged down by the “that can’t be done that way” attitudes in the face of change. Even when the reality is that we should be removing obstacles and simplifying processes instead of settling into an outdated process.A client once started a meeting by asking, “what are you trying to achieve, and what is the quickest way to get there?” That simply stated question is how we should think about processes, targets, goals, experiences, and almost anything that has to be accomplished. The client had boiled down the information she wanted to know to its simplest form and we were able to move forward quickly from there.So, what does that mean for you? For your members? For your website? For your loan growth? Share growth? Email blasts? When is the last time you checked out what your website looks like on a cellphone? When is the last time you tried to find a “join now” link on your home page and where did the link take you when you found it? If members, or potential members, can’t find basic information within seconds, you are not communicating effectively. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Telkomsel records surge in data traffic, use over Idul Fitri

first_imgTelkomsel also noted unusually high data traffic in Greater Jakarta, which typically emptied during the holiday as people left for their hometowns on mudik. Instead, it recorded a 60.9 percent yoy surge in data traffic in the area.In correlation, annual mudik destinations recorded fewer arrivals among Telkomsel customers.The company’s customer tracking data showed a decline in arrivals of 77 percent in West Java, 83 percent in Central Java and 83 percent in East Java compared to 2019 figures. Setyanto added that Telkomsel would continue to expand its quality, capacity and coverage to provide better data services to customers.The statement said the company had expanded its network to 436 points of interest, focusing on improved coverage in residential areas, hospitals and transportation hubs.Topics : “As a connectivity enabler, Telkomsel has tried to ensure that each customer can still [reach out] in silaturahmi (spirit of kinship) and remain connected with loved ones, despite having to do so from home,” Setyanto said in a written statement released on Wednesday.As Telkomsel customers turned to digital means to connect with their loved ones during Idul Fitri, the company recorded a steep hike of 75.4 percent in mobile data use compared to normal days.Messaging service WhatsApp recorded the biggest increase during the holiday compared to other messaging apps, with usage up 49.2 percent.Social media platforms still dominated data use at 30.8 percent, showing an uptick of 3.6 percent from normal use.  Telkomsel saw its mobile data traffic soar during Idul Fitri on May 24 to 25, as customers nationwide used digital platforms to connect with family and friends over the Muslim holiday while adhering to the stay-at-home policy.The mobile network operator and subsidiary of state-owned telecommunications giant Telkom recorded a peak increase of 22.8 percent to 26.7 petabytes (PB) in mobile data traffic during Idul Fitri, and a year-on-year (yoy) increase of 42.1 percent compared to the same period in 2019.Telkomsel president director Setyanto Hantoro noted that many customers celebrated Idul Fitri differently this year because of the COVID-19 epidemic, which had prompted people to stay at home instead of traveling on the annual mudik (exodus).last_img read more

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