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Russia, NATO Discuss Fuel Resupply in Gulf of Aden

first_img View post tag: Resupply View post tag: Fuel Russia, NATO Discuss Fuel Resupply in Gulf of Aden View post tag: Navy Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia, NATO Discuss Fuel Resupply in Gulf of Aden March 8, 2013 View post tag: discuss View post tag: Aden View post tag: Gulf View post tag: Defense View post tag: Naval View post tag: Russia View post tag: News by topic View post tag: NATO Within the framework of anti-piracy cooperation in the Gulf of Aden Russia and NATO are negotiating about fuel resupply of the warships, participating…[mappress]Source: Russian Navy, March 8, 2013; Image: Mil View post tag: Defencelast_img read more

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KULNIS, IRENE (nee: Lojewski)

first_img88, passed away on January 7, 2017 at Staten Island University Hospital. She was born in Bayonne and resided there until moving to Tarpon Springs Florida in 1989. Irene and her late husband Edward owned and operated the Central Bar in Bayonne for over 40 years. Wife of the late Edward Kulnis. Mother of Miriam Kulnis and Pamela Gutierrez and her husband Ronald. Grandmother of Matthew. Sister of Helen Jakubowski. Funeral arrangements by FRYCZYNSKI Funeral Home, 32-34 E. 22nd St.last_img

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ACOSTA, STEPHEN ANTHONY

first_imgPrivate funeral services have been held for Stephen Anthony Acosta, 47, of Newark. He passed away April 10. Born in St. Croix, USVI, Stephen was a graduate of St. Croix Central High School before coming to Jersey City in 1991. He went on to study at Jersey City State College, where he earned a bachelor’s and later a master’s degree and was currently pursuing his doctorate. Stephen began his career in education teaching math for the Hudson County Juvenile Detention Program in Secaucus before taking a position with the Hudson County Schools of Technology. He could be described as a well-mannered, quiet and shy individual who never complained, and whose passion was helping the at-risk youth of his community. In his spare time, he enjoyed drawing and had a love for calypso music, traveling to Brooklyn to take lessons for the steel pans. He was also an avid fan of the LA Lakers. Stephen was the son of the late Inocencio and Anna Maria Acosta. Left to cherish his memory are his siblings, Elizbeth, Inocencio, Jr., Juan and Gregory Acosta. Also survived by many aunts and uncles and nieces and nephews.Services arranged by the McLaughlin Funeral Home, Jersey City.last_img read more

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O.C. Family Sees Green, Helps Environment

first_imgOcean City School District students and siblings, Nicholas Sardy, 12, and Emma, 16, stand next to a recyclable bin at the high school. The bins are part of a recycling challenge. (Photos courtesy Amy Sardy) Maddy VitaleEmma Sardy likes living at the ocean. She appreciates its beauty and wants to make sure the beaches and the waterways are free of plastics.She and her family moved to Ocean City from Ridgewood in Bergen County two years ago.Since then, Emma Sardy, 16, an Ocean City High School junior and her brother, Nicholas, 12, who goes to the Intermediate School, are showing their community their proven track record of success with collecting plastics.“Living in Ocean City allows me to see the impact that we have on our environment and enables me to work to lessen that impact,” Emma Sardy said.Emma is involved in the S.E.A., Student Environmental Association, and she runs a 400-gallon fish tank in the high school. She is also a student member of the Ocean City Environmental Commission.The Sardys became involved with collecting plastics partly because of the “Trex Challenge,” a recycling program by a deck company. The company gives out benches, bird feeders and other items to the top schools. For more information visit https://www.trex.com/recycling/recycling-programs/.“We really love the ocean and want to help maintain it. Not only is plastic a detriment to the animals, but it is decomposing and making the water not viable,” mother Amy Sardy said. “We are not perfect environmentalists in our house, but we started to realize when we had so much plastic in our life.”Mounds of plastic collected at the Sardys’ former school district in Bergen County.Amy Sardy said her children’s former school district in Bergen County participated in the challenge. It interested the family so much, especially Emma, that they decided when they moved to Ocean City they would present the same challenge at the Ocean City School District.District officials were very supportive of the idea and so far, the Intermediate School, with the help of Nick Sardy, and the high school believe in the challenge. Each school has bins set aside for people to drop off the plastics, Sardy explained.“It is an amazing program. It is something that became important to our family,” she added.She said the Intermediate School Trex Challenge has “taken off like gangbusters.”“They have really embraced the idea of collecting plastic,” Sardy added.Emma oversees the high school program.Amy Sardy said she is pleased with her children for taking the initiative.“I’m very proud of Emma for trying to do something outside the box. My kids have really taken this for their cause,” Sardy said. “Nick brought it to the Intermediate School, Emma to the high school.”She added that Ocean City has done a really good job promoting it.“Emma has been on morning announcements and emails are sent out detailing how it is going,” she said.The winning Trex Challenge schools are awarded benches and other items made from recycled materials.As a family, the Sardys, including Matt, the father, and sons Christopher, 13, and Brendan, 10, being environmentally conscious is an important part of their lives.“When you personally start collecting the plastic that could get into the oceans or damage the environment, you realize how much one household contributes to that,” Amy Sardy said. “There is no way to live plastic-free, but you could recycle and reuse it. That way it is put to good use.”last_img read more

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Jobs saved as Lancashire bakery is sold

first_imgForty-four jobs have been saved at a bakery in Blackburn after it was bought out of administration.Cheshire-based company Flash Sandersons purchased the business and assets of Sandersons Confectioners, renamed Sandersons UK Limited, for £65,500, securing the jobs. According to an official report produced by administrator Leonard Curtis, “the economic climate had a significant effect on the business”, which resulted in cashflow difficulties, and pressure from creditors, in particular HM Revenue & Customs. The bakery owed approximately £256,000 to creditors.Following losses of £14,695 for the year ended 31 May 2013, the business was placed into administration. The administrators sought to find a buyer to take the business on as a going concern and received interest from 18 parties, before a sale was finally agreed with Flash Sandersons – a company unconnected to the original business.Jonathan Barton, director at Sandersons UK, said that he planned to expand the business with more outlets, product lines and staff. “I want to move further into foodservice, which is my background, and try to knock on the doors of hotel and restaurant groups. I’ve taken on six new members in the last four weeks,” he said. “I’ve not bought a business to leave it tinkering along. You put investment into the business to bring new customers and to make it grow. In the new year we’ll open a few more shops.”Barton added that although locations for expansion have not been decided, he will be looking towards towns and cities for a high footfall.Founded in 1930, the business expanded and began trading from the village bakery in Mellor Brook, Lancashire in 1949. It then relocated to a 12,000sq ft leasehold premises at Ramsgreave Bakery, Blackburn, in 1984.Mark Colman, director of Leonard Curtis, said: “The demise of a well-established, traditional East Lancashire business, which has traded since the 1930s, demonstrates the ongoing challenges to the SME market in the north west.“However, despite the company falling into administration, we were able to secure a successful sale of the business as a going concern, which has resulted in securing 44 jobs in the local community.”The bakery supplies bread, cakes, pies and pastries to sandwich shops, hotels, schools, hospitals and catering establishments around the north west of England.last_img read more

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Watch Roosevelt Collier Lead Members Of Snarky Puppy, Dopapod, & Kung Fu At Brooklyn Comes Alive

first_imgLast year marked the second annual Brooklyn Comes Alive festival, mixing over 50 musicians in unique super-group formations across three venues in Brooklyn. The highly anticipated urban festival hosted a very exciting edition of Roosevelt Collier’s New York Get Down, with the renowned pedal steel guitarist welcoming Michael League (Snarky Puppy), Adrian Tramontano (Kung Fu), Eli Winderman (Dopapod) and Rob Compa (Dopapod) for a jam session for the ages. Their performance was beyond tight, with the group eventually also being joined by Jackson Kincheloe of Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds. Following Kincheloe’s sit-in, the all-star crew moved into a stellar rendition of  “Hottentot,” a classic written by John Scofield. Check out footage of “Hottentot” below, courtesy of MKDevo.You can scope the full setlist from this super jam, below.Setlist: Roosevelt Collier’s New York Get Down ft. Michael League, Adrian Tramontano, Eli Winderman and Rob Compa at Brooklyn Comes Alive, Brooklyn, NY – 10/22/16Churchin, Spank-A-Lee, Don’t Keep Me Wondering*, Hottentot, Weird Fishes/Arpeggi, Rampage, Foxy Lady* w/ Jackson Kincheloe of Sister Sparrow & The Dirty BirdsThe 2017 Brooklyn Comes Alive lineup features members of Umphrey’s McGee, moe., The Disco Biscuits, The String Cheese Incident, Trey Anastasio Band, and so many more. Iconic legends, such as John Scofield, George Porter Jr., Cyril Neville, DJ Premier, Johnny Vidacovich, and Henry Butler, will join members of nationally touring bands, such as GRAMMY-winners Snarky Puppy, The Meters, Primus, Soulive, Lettuce, The Motet, Lotus, Railroad Earth, The Infamous Stringdusters,Yonder Mountain String Band, The Russ Liquid Test, SunSquabi, Pendulum, Destroid, The Crystal Method, Midnight North, Aqueous, Kung Fu, Electric Beethoven, and more. Check out the full lineup of artists below, and stay tuned for upcoming announcements about bands, supergroup formations, and special tribute sets.***Tickets Are On Sale Now!***Each ticket grants attendees in-and-out access to all three venues, creating the feeling of an indoor music festival all within the heart of Williamsburg. In true Brooklyn Comes Alive-fashion, a brunch set will kick off the music each day, and performances will continue into the early hours of the morning with special late-night performances.To find out more about ticketing, VIP options, and lodging, head to the festival website.last_img read more

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Nobel laureate Hubel dies at 87

first_imgHarvard Medical School Professor David H. Hubel, whose discoveries in visual processing and development ushered in the modern study of the cerebral cortex and changed the way childhood cataracts and strabismus (“cross-eye”) were treated, died on Sept. 22 of kidney failure in Lincoln, Mass. He was 87.Hubel, the John Enders Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus, and longtime research partner Torsten Wiesel shared half of the 1981 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for their groundbreaking insights into the structure and function of the visual cortex and the importance of exposure to certain visual stimuli shortly after birth for normal vision development. (The other half of that year’s prize went to Roger Sperry for finding that the two hemispheres of the brain have specialized functions.)“David was one of the great scientists of his generation,” said Michael Greenberg, Nathan Marsh Pusey Professor of Neurobiology and chair of the Department of Neurobiology at HMS. “His work revealed how the brain is organized to produce visual perception. The insights we have gained from his discoveries resonate to all aspects of sensory perception. Not only were his experimental findings revolutionary, David was also a passionate teacher and a talented communicator. Everyone in the field of neurobiology has been inspired by his achievements.”A memorial service will be held at the Memorial Church on Nov. 16 at 2 p.m. Interment will take place at a later date at Mount Royal Cemetery in Montreal. The HMS Department of Neurobiology will hold a celebration of Professor Hubel’s scientific achievements next spring.Memorial donations may be made to a newly established Hubel Memorial Fund.To read the full obituary, visit the HMS website.last_img read more

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From lecture to comedy sketch

first_img Samuel Fisch ’20 and Lance Oppenheim ’19 capture Arts First and the student experience of the arts on campus From the Everglades to Tribeca Improv can boost social and professional skills, students find Students see professors stand up in front of a class every day, but they don’t often see them do stand-up onstage. In spring, the Harvard College Stand Up Comic Society changed that with the first Harvard faculty comedy showcase.Faculty members and deans wrote jokes and learned how to channel their classroom expertise into a stage performance. Students from the Stand Up Comic Society coached them, helping finesse their routines.“This is eight members of faculty who are volunteering several things,” said one of the participants, Andrew Berry, a lecturer in organismic and evolutionary biology. “Their time, their effort — and their pride. Because this is inevitably going to be a case of humiliation — for a good cause.”The inaugural Faculty Lounge raised more than $2,000 for area homeless shelters, and the student group has since made it an annual event.,“Eight members of faculty … are volunteering several things. Their time, their effort — and their pride.” — Andrew Berry,Related Heard the one about the comedy writer? ‘While other kids were going out for sports teams and trading ‘Yu-Gi-Oh!’ cards, I was already a 40-year-old, fedora-wearing film snob’ center_img For more than just laughs Instagram takeover: Students highlight the arts on Harvard’s account Nell Scovell ’82 schools students in the art of joke writing The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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CUSE workshops aim to broaden undergraduate research opportunities

first_imgIn an effort to promote intellectual development, the Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) hosts workshops across campus that cater to undergraduates interested in research, scholarly engagement, creative endeavors and fellowships.Assistant director of undergraduate research, Yvonne Mikuljan, said the CUSE workshops introduce students to various kinds of research and learning experiences while offering advice about how to pursue those opportunities.“CUSE workshops and advising are designed to encourage undergraduates to think about their own unique interests and goals and assist students in developing meaningful research projects and experiences,” Mikuljan said.The two workshops CUSE regularly offer are “Getting Started in Undergraduate Research,” which explores different kinds of research and scholarly engagement opportunities, strategies for finding a faculty mentor and developing a plan for pursuit of such interests and goals, and “Crafting a Strong Grant Proposal,” which walks students through funding sources at Notre Dame, the components of a grant application and a composing an effective grant proposal, Mikuljan said.Student programming coordinator for CUSE, Kati Schuler, said the workshops welcome students from all majors and grade levels every week.“If you’re not quite sure where to begin exploring research and engagement opportunities at Notre Dame, ‘Getting Started in Undergraduate Research’ is the right workshop for you,” Schuler said. “If you have a specific project planned and would like to start the process of securing funding, ‘How to Write a Strong Grant Proposal’ would be the best.”Since 2012, CUSE has offered about 35 workshops annually that are open to all undergraduate students, Schuler said. The workshops are typically held in Brownson Hall.“We also bring our workshops into classes if a professor requests it,” Schuler said. “For example, in 2016–2017, 130 students attended the workshops held in the CUSE office, but we saw another 245 students during in-class workshops.”Outside of workshops, Schuler said CUSE offers individual mentoring and advising to students pursuing scholarly engagement outside of class. Students can make an appointment with an advisor to discuss their project plans and get help on drafting a proposal, she said.“CUSE can also help students connect to all of the various centers, institutes and resources on campus,” Schuler said. “We work like a compass, helping to guide you through all of the different opportunities at Notre Dame.”Mikuljan said CUSE is currently in the process of developing a grant writing series to provide more hands-on assistance during the grant writing process.“CUSE is always working to create new and better workshops and resources to help students be successful in their research and scholarly endeavors,” Mikuljan said. “Undergraduate students of every level and every college and discipline participate in a range for research activities at Notre Dame, around the country and abroad.”Sophomore anthropology major Dayonni Phillips said she attended CUSE workshops to learn how to write a grant after being invited to do research in Ireland and attend a field school in Poland.“I would definitely recommend students attend CUSE workshops or get involved with CUSE even if they do not have research plans,” Phillips said. “Although the CUSE workshop was meant to teach students how to organize a general grant proposal, I felt like the instructor was interested in specific questions that students had pertaining to their personal grants, and he would then address those questions as well.”Tags: CUSE, Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement, grant proposal, grant writinglast_img read more

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Georgia Guard trains at UGA

first_img“Assalamu alaikum,” or “peace be upon you,” will soon be a common greeting for a team of Georgia National Guardsmen as they learn to speak Pashto. The group will deploy to Afghanistan this May on a special mission to revitalize the war-torn country’s agriculture industry. University of Georgia agricultural experts helped arm them with the knowledge to do it. In February, 21 members of the National Guard’s 201st Agribusiness Development Team visited the UGA campus in Athens to get hands-on training from specialists with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The guardsmen learned about irrigation, crop production, pest management, soils assessment, livestock management and food storage. “This not a typical training session for us, but when the Georgia National Guard asked for help, we wanted to do all we could,” said Steve Brown, assistant dean for UGA Cooperative Extension. “While our scientists may not be experts in Afghan agriculture, the basics are the same worldwide.”Essential SkillsExperts also taught the guardsmen how to hold and care for chickens, care for a beehive, prune fruit trees and milk cows. These are essential skills for a country whose agriculture industry is decades behind those of developed countries. “Milk is a big carrier of diseases like salmonella, tuberculosis, listeria and E. coli,” said Steve Nickerson, UGA dairy scientist. “We are teaching them how to collect the milk in sanitary ways to limit the transmission of disease. They use open systems in Afghanistan to collect milk; if you handle it wrong, you could be killing kids.” The handpicked guard unit is based at Fort Gordon in Augusta, Ga., but members hail from across the state. The team consists of engineers, teachers, pesticide applicators, veterinarians, marketing experts and farmers. It also includes four UGA grads: Gary Church, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources; Carmen Benson, CAES; George McCommon, CAES and College of Veterinary Medicine; and Catherine Tait, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. “UGA provides the technical expertise and the experience for this education,” said Lt. Col. Ken Baldowski, media relations officer for the Georgia National Guard. “Afghans are using farming methods that are hundreds of years old in a soil that is depleted of all nutrients. The talent, expertise and knowledge shared with us at UGA will help us to perform this important mission.”The Mission“This is a very different mission for us,” Baldowski said. “While Georgia Guardsmen have been deployed to Afghanistan for more than 10 years, now we are arriving with technology and agricultural know-how to share with the Afghan farmers. We hope these methods and insights will help them to produce crops to feed their families and possibly to create a viable agricultural export product.” More than 80 percent of Afghanistan residents are farmers but lack the knowledge to produce viable crops and productive yields. “Afghanistan may be a high-tech battlefield,” said Col. Williams, who commands Augusta’s 201st Regional Support Group, “but its agricultural practices are like those of America’s during the 1900s, or in some cases the 1800s. And the income of its people, especially the farmers, is in terrible shape.” Thirty years of war and prolonged drought have set Afghan farmers way back, said Williams, who will lead the first of three ADT teams to Afghanistan this spring. Georgia is the 13th state to send a specialized ADT team to Afghanistan. The 201st will replace a group from Nevada when they arrive in May. “Our job will be to help the Afghans change their practices through education, mentorship and ‘easy-to-train, easy-to-sustain’ crop, livestock, water and land-management projects that fit their culture and environment,” Williams said. RebuildingPotatoes, apples, apricots, wheat and eggplant are staples for Afghan farmers. Obstacles like watershed management, lack of refrigeration, limited access to markets and quality seed sources, and transportation hurdles make rebuilding the Afghanistan agriculture industry difficult. “Our goal is to assist the government in administering these programs by mentoring them so that the government can run them,” Williams said. “Assisting the farmers and villages in creating markets for their food so they can be more self-sufficient and not dependent on foreign imports is a key component to our mission.” “Assalamu alaikum” is usually uttered with one hand over the heart to show sincerity. Although the National Guard team is being deployed, they all volunteered to be a part of this team. A sincere desire to help the Afghan people improve their farming practices and better their lives – and the future of their country – is at the heart of their mission.“Even though we are in some dangerous territory, they are good people and that is what is rewarding,” Williams said. “They are no different than us. The way things get done is through relationships. Loyalty and commitment is very important to them, as it is to us.”last_img read more

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