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Synchronous timing of abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period

first_imgAbrupt climate changes during the last glacial period have been detected in a global array of palaeoclimate records, but our understanding of their absolute timing and regional synchrony is incomplete. Our compilation of 63 published, independently dated speleothem records shows that abrupt warmings in Greenland were associated with synchronous climate changes across the Asian Monsoon, South American Monsoon, and European-Mediterranean regions that occurred within decades. Together with the demonstration of bipolar synchrony in atmospheric response, this provides independent evidence of synchronous high-latitude–to-tropical coupling of climate changes during these abrupt warmings. Our results provide a globally coherent framework with which to validate model simulations of abrupt climate change and to constrain ice-core chronologies.last_img read more

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USCG Offloads 650 Pounds of Marijuana

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USCG Offloads 650 Pounds of Marijuana Authorities View post tag: Marijuana View post tag: USCG View post tag: pounds August 24, 2015 View post tag: americas View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy Share this article View post tag: Offloads View post tag: News by topic View post tag: 650 USCG Offloads 650 Pounds of Marijuana The US Coast Guard offloaded nearly $600,000 estimated wholesale value of marijuana, a total of 650 pounds, at Coast Guard Sector Miami, Friday.On Aug. 3, the Coast Guard Cutter Dependable detected a go-fast vessel with suspicious packages off the coast of Jamaica. The men aboard the go-fast began jettisoning packages overboard after the Dependable began pursuit. The Dependable launched its small boat and stopped the suspect vessel after employing disabling fire against one of the outboard engines. Dependable later recovered 25 packages of marijuana from the water.The four suspected smugglers were transferred to federal authorities for investigation.[mappress mapid=”16747″]Image: USCGlast_img read more

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Japan to send helicopter carrier to South China Sea mission

first_img Share this article Japan is likely to send its Izumo-class helicopter carrier to the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean this year as well. The two-month deployment of the 27,000-ton JS Kaga comes as Japan aims to boost its presence in this strategically important region, Reuters reported citing two unnamed Japanese officials as saying.The 248-meter-long JS Kaga, which was commissioned last year at Japan Marine United shipyard, will visit Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka as part of the mission scheduled to start in September.“This is part of Japan’s efforts to promote a free and open Indo-Pacific,” one of the officials told Reuters.The move to send the vessel allegedly comes amid mounting concerns of Japan and the US over China’s military presence in the disputed waters.Last year, Japanese 24,000 helicopter carrier JS Izumo also participated in a three-month deployment to the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean.Referred to as helicopter-destroyers by the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force, JS Kaga and JS Izumo are capable of operating some nine helicopters from their decks and are armed with two Raytheon RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile SeaRAM launchers and two Phalanx close-in weapon systems. View post tag: Izumo View post tag: JS Kaga View post tag: Indian Oceancenter_img View post tag: Japan View post tag: South China Sea Photo: Photo: JMSDFlast_img read more

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Oxford’s own… Charlie Mauleverer

first_imgFor those seeking relaxing classical music outside the wearisome confines of Classic FM, solace comes in the form of Vista Musicale. Their album, From Innocence to Age, is jointly composed by homegrown music talent Charlie Mauleverer (St Peter’s College), and performed by some of Britain’s best young musicians (including BBC Chorister of the Year 2001) from Winchester College. Harmoniously using string, piano flute and voice, it seems inspired from the past in its form. Yet there is an undeniably contemporary air about it. The choral elements rise above sometimes banal verse to achieve sublimely romantic effects. The pieces glide seamlessly into each other whilst works like ‘Enigma’ and the ‘String Quartets’ add life to the soothing experience. Some of the tracks leave the listener with the sense they should have been allowed to develop their themes more fully. Overall though, this is a solid debut and not just a cure for examstress. It’s an enjoyable experience in its own right and with a high standard of composition and performance the album could be ‘Music to watch clouds by’. The CD can be purchased from www.vistamusicale.comARCHIVE: 6th week TT 2004last_img read more

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Geoffrey Hopkins in concert: Beethoven piano sonatas

first_imgA programme consisting solely of Beethoven’s piano sonatas promised to be a challenging recital, but also a very rewarding experience for any pianist or listener.  The concert was performed by Oxford resident, Geoffrey Hopkins, at the Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St. Hilda’s College, on 18th January.  Despite containing music written by solely one composer, the recital was very varied.  Hopkins chose three sonatas, which were written at different stages of Beethoven’s life, and therefore differed greatly in style.    The opening sonata (Sonata in C major, op.2 no.3) was written in the early years of Beethoven’s compositional career and demonstrates the influence of early-classical period composers such as Mozart and Haydn.  Hopkins’ rendition of this sonata began wonderfully, with an expressive melody-line and secure finger-work.  The chords throughout were generally well balanced, although some of the larger chords lacked emphasis on the top line, and thus perhaps felt a little heavy for the style.  The third (Scherzo and Trio) movement was particularly enjoyable, although could perhaps have been a little more energetic, since some of the ‘bounce’ of the music was lost in the scalic passages.  The second sonata Hopkins played (Sonata in F minor, op. 57,‘Appassionata’) contrasted greatly with the first piece.  Hopkins seemed to enjoy the later, more romantic style, and this was evident in his performance. The tone was appropriately warm throughout all three movements of the work, and the first movement displayed some particularly impressive technical playing.  Hopkins’ performance of the ‘Appassionata’ sonata was particularly warmly received.    The final piece was Beethoven’s Sonata in C minor (op. 111).  This is the final sonata that Beethoven wrote for piano, and contains some unusual harmonies and chromaticism.  Again, Hopkins’ playing was striking and very stylistically fitting; the second movement was particularly beautiful and expressive.  Overall, Hopkins’ playing throughout this concert was convincing and technically assured, and the programme well chosen.  However, the concert perhaps deserved a more lively encore than that chosen by Hopkins.  After the intensity of the final two sonatas, a playful Beethoven scherzo or Schubert impromptu may have been more appropriate a conclusion than the slow movement from Beethoven’s G major sonata (op. 59).  In general, however, the audience was very impressed by Hopkins’ performance.    by Sarah Blackfordlast_img read more

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It’s all in the mixer

first_imgI t could be said that the smaller bakery revolves around its mixer, dire pun though that is. Apart from the oven, the mixer is probably the piece of equipment most vital to day-to-day production. Strange, then, that it is a piece of equipment that the modern age has passed by in many artisan operations.Anthony Kindred, of Kindred Bakery in Herne Hill, London and director of the National Association of Master Bakers, says that, like most of his fellow craft bakers: “I bought one I liked and I have kept it forever.”For bread dough mixes he bought a spiral mixer in 1984 and replaced that with a bigger version 11 years ago. For smaller bread doughs and cake mixes he has a planetary mixer, a Hobart, which is “probably older than I am!”. The only upgrade that it has required is a safety guard.Kindred says no-one has ever made the argument to change for energy-saving or efficiency reasons. A timer might be useful, he says, but that said, it is in the nature of a craft baker to want to give the mixture some extra stirring at the end to get it right. So is there a whole brave new world of mixers out there, passing the craft sector by?David Marsh, managing director of Benier UK, is not pressing anyone into hasty action. He tells British Baker that a good mixer, sourced from a reputable supplier can last up to 20 years if it is properly serviced and maintained. “The most common reason why bakers will change their mixers is because their business needs change, either through growth or product mix,” he says.For a baker planning to change his mixer, the key criterion is that it is the appropriate size to meet the requirements of the business. “Too small and it will hold back your business, too large and you are spending money unnecessarily,” says Marsh.The other main criterion, particularly given the longevity of this product, is “to buy from a reputable supplier who has a proven record in service, repairs and maintenance,” he advises. But, he suggests, it is worth upgrading, particularly for reasons of hygiene, to a mixer made with stainless steel surfaces, for example.Variable speeds and cyclesWhereas older mixers may only have two speeds, many modern mixers also have optional variable speed drives, which means they can also mix the dough more gently or more robustly, as required.Another development is programmable mixing cycles, which can stop and start the mixer at intervals to allow the dough to rest or other ingredients to be added. And interchangeable tools are now available; one example might be a spiral mixer toolfor bread dough, which can be quickly and easily replaced by a tool that will beat butter/fat into the dough to make a Scotch pastry paste.Supplier Mono Equipment’s marketing manager Claire Roberts suggests that extra capacity or the fact that your current mixer doesn’t comply with safety regulations are the two main reasons for a mixer to be replaced. The advantages of newer models over older ones include advanced programming, more mixing programmes, up-to-date safety features guards and automatic bowl lifting and lowering plus increased capacity, she suggests. Again, reliability is the most important criteria for this sort of purchase, whether spiral or planetary mixer.Strength, processing times and hygiene, such as that offered by a complete stainless steel model, are also major factors in the decision-making process. How user-friendly is the model? Does it have a wipe-clean control panel and additional equipment such as hooks, whips, scrappers? These are also questions that the baker should ask when making a purchase. Finally, is the bowl size right for the volumes of doughs passing through the bakery? Mono stocks the new Ergo Bear range of mixers, Roberts says, the advantages of which include a digital timer, soft bowl lowering, a stainless steel beater and shorter processing times.Looking to the industrial sector to see what the future might hold, supplier Baker Perkins’ Tweedy range of mixing systems for high-output plants now includes a pressure/vacuum mixing option, which can be retrofitted. The benefits of pressure/vacuum mixing include: increased yield as dough is more machinable at a higher water content; improved crumb colour and softness hence improved shelf-life; and a reduction in expensive ascorbic acid normally used to aid oxidation.The pressure/vacuum process involves the application of pressure and vacuum sequentially to the mixing bowl. The pressure and vacuum stages of the cycle can be adjusted, so that the full range of structures can be produced, from open-structured breads such as baguettes to pan breads, says marketing manager Keith Graham.Meanwhile, supplier European Process Plant supplies a mixer to the industry that it claims stays cleaner for longer. MD Keith Stalker explains: “VMI’s new Expert mixers are incredibly easy to wash down, because the materials used are stainless steel and some high-density polyethylene. Its profile has been designed without any zones of retention.”Outside the core bakery sector, food-service suppliers are developing commercial thermo-blenders, such as the EasyPro by Hotmix, manufactured in Italy by Vitaeco. This can chop, purée, grate, grind, mill, mince, knead, liquidise, mix, stir and emulsify. It will also heat and cook food creams, sauces and jams, for example at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 130°C, while continuously mixing at variable speeds. Another option is the Thermomix, a power mixer that also weighs, cooks, steams and grinds.But whatever the features available on a modern mixer, some will always prefer to nurture an old friend. It’s a similar argument to the one that rages between the classic car brigade and fans of a more modern ride. It’s often not just about getting from A to B in the craft baking sector either.last_img read more

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The first moon walk

first_img Exhibit charts history of Apollo 11 moon mission Houghton Library show marking 50th anniversary of moonwalk includes NASA artifacts Research led by grad student points to origins in ‘synestia,’ challenging widely accepted model A new view of the mooncenter_img Related Fifty years ago, American astronauts landed on the surface of the moon, inspiring a new wave of scientific research and discovery about the cosmos. Now, the Harvard Museum of Natural History is displaying parts of that history in a new mini-exhibit looking at what scientists have learned about the beginnings and workings of the known universe.“Cosmic Origins,” opens Saturday, the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s lunar landing, and includes a portion of a moon rock collected during NASA’s Apollo 12 mission.“In the 50 years since we first set foot on the moon, humanity’s understanding of the origins and evolution not only of our planet and solar system, but also of the vast wider universe, has grown astronomically,” said Janis Sacco, director of exhibitions at the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture. “‘Cosmic Origins’ represents a sampling of this growing body of knowledge, assembled with the help of Harvard faculty and researchers in the departments of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Astronomy.“From my perspective, what is most exciting about the science in ‘Cosmic Origins’ is what it reveals about common origins and the nature of all that we know in the universe,” she said. “Everything we can see and touch, the processes that shape worlds, even life itself, all arise from the activities of stars. For me, it is a wondrous thing that we are all connected to the larger cosmos in this way.”,Along with the moon rock, visitors can touch iron meteorites from the collections of the Harvard Mineralogical and Geological Museum and see a wall-sized mural of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant 6,500 light years away. A media station explores 3D models of the universe, theories about the creation of moons, the nature of asteroids and meteorites, and famous Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei’s observations of Jupiter’s moons.The presentation is located within the Earth & Planetary Sciences exhibit and is on view through Nov. 27. A special event, “Lunar Soirée,” celebrating the 1969 moon landing takes place the same day as the opening. Admission is $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers. The event is 21-plus.“Cosmic Origins” is on display at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., on the Harvard campus. The museum is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Plan your visit or call 617.495.3045 for admission prices.The mini-exhibit is presented in memory of the late John Huchra, vice provost for research policy at Harvard University and a professor of astronomy at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics,through the generosity of Rebecca Henderson, Ph.D. ’88, John and Natty McArthur University Professor at Harvard Business School.last_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Clinton Visits Haiti, Dam Victories for American Rivers, The North Face Joins Virtual Training World, and More

first_imgSome of the best dirt of the week from around the Blue Ridge and beyond…Former President Clinton Visits Atlanta’s Boxercraft active apparelBased in Atlanta, Ga., Boxercraft (a growing fashion-forward activewear and spiritwear manufacturer) welcomed former President Bill Clinton this week to Industrial Revolution II (www.irii.com, IRII), its manufacturing facility in Haiti. Founded by Rob Broggi (former analyst at Boston-based Raptor Capital), and backed by designer Donna Karan, actor Matt Damon, and Joey Adler (CEO of Diesel Canada), IRII started production at its 35,000 square-foot facility in Port-au-Prince last September. Through its unique “shared- value business model,” the factory invests 50 percent of its profits back into its workers, their families and the local community through health and wellness programs, training and education initiatives. For more information, visit www.boxercraft.com.American Rivers Announces Dam Removal StatsAmerican Rivers announced this week that communities in 18 states — working in partnership with non-profit organizations and state and federal agencies — removed 51 dams in 2013. Outdated or unsafe dams came out of rivers in Alabama, California, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming, restoring more than 500 miles of streams for the benefit of fish, wildlife and people.Pennsylvania topped the list for the eleventh year in a row. The top three states for river restoration through dam removal in 2013 were:Pennsylvania – 12 dams removedOregon – 8 dams removedNew Jersey – 4 dams removedAmerican Rivers will add the information on these 51 dam removals to its database of nearly 1,150 dams that have been removed across the country since 1912. (American Rivers is the only organization maintaining a record of dam removals in the United States and uses the information to communicate the benefits of dam removal, which include restoring river health and clean water, revitalizing fish and wildlife, improving public safety and recreation, and enhancing local economies.)See the full list at AmericanRivers.org/2013DamRemovals.North Face Launches Mountain Athletics Virtual Training ProgramThe North Face launched a digital training platform (along with its new Mountain Athletics training apparel and footwear collection) called the Mountain Athletics Training Program (thenorthface.com/mountainathletics), designed to help everyday athletes and serious competitors establish a goal within three sports: running, climbing and skiing. Based on a six-week timeline, athletes get a playlist of instructional videos led by The North Face Athlete Team members along with a downloadable training plan that will help you accomplish your outdoor goals.Light & Motion Factory to Be Featured in Discovery Channel ProgramFans of bike-light manufacturer Light & Motion will want to tune into the Discovery Channel this Fall, as the company’s fully integrated factory in California will be featured on the channel’s “How It’s Made” program. The show’s crew is currently filming at Light & Motion’s new California factory in Marina, Calif., where they are documenting the manufacturing and assembly of the LED-based Seca and Vis360 bike lights, the Bluefin G-30 underwater camera housing, and the company’s flagship dive light, the Sola 1200. “How It’s Made” takes viewers behind the scenes in factories around the world to show how raw materials are transformed into finished products. The show airs in 130 countries and is broadcast in more than 30 different languages.last_img read more

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Sugar Mountain’s Revamped Downhill Mountain Bike Park

first_imgOn June 30, and after a $300,000 investment, Sugar Mountain has reopened its doors to mountain bikers.Along with their classic technical terrain, the park features newly built beginner and intermediate trail systems. Wide open berms, rollers, tabletops, rock gardens, and drops pose unique challenges for riders at Sugar Mountain. Every trail features multiple line options and obstacles for all types of downhill mountain biking. For more information, check out their updated trail map.Lead by PJ Noto, the former Lees McRae College trail construction specialist, the trail expansion will gradually improve upon the existing system. The lifts are updated too!Magic Cycles Bike Shop, located in the base lodge, has everything you need for a day at Sugar Mountain. Bike rentals are available and include pads with a full-face helmet. Don’t need a bike? They rent gear individually as well.Located in Sugar Mountain, N.C., the resort is under a 30-minute drive from nearby Beech Mountain. It will take you about an hour to get there from Johnson City, Wilkesboro, and Morganton. From Asheville, you’ll be there in just under two hours.Check out this video for more on the mountain and a first-person look at their updated trails!Justin Forrest is an outdoor writer, fly fishing addict, and co-founder of Narrative North—based in Asheville, N.C. He posts pictures of cats and fishing on Instagram sometimes.last_img read more

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Getting ready for a credit union tabletop exercise

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr At Ongoing Operations, we facilitate hundreds of credit union tabletop exercises a year. It’s usually a fun day for the facilitator but because so few credit unions diligently set aside time for this critical step in Business Continuity Planning (BCP) the day can be full of apprehension and anxiety of “what to expect”. I’ve noticed that as participants become more familiar with the process they become much more engaged and the results are seen in better gap identification and participation.  To help you prepare your staff for an internal tabletop exercise, we’ve put together this checklist for you to use. Enjoy!What Is A Credit Union Tabletop Exercise?A credit union tabletop exercise is often used as a preliminary evaluation tool to determine the readiness of an organization. A tabletop is NOT a disaster recovery exercise. Tabletops exercise people, disaster recovery exercises test systems.  At Ongoing Operations, we “exercise” our own Business Continuity Plan (BCP) at least once a year at our all staff meeting.Why Do We Need To Do A Tabletop?Simply because we want to have the best possible chance of sustaining (recovering) services to our members during a crisis. By “exercising”, we have an opportunity to identify “gaps” or areas for improvement. continue reading »last_img read more

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