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Florida ‘stand your ground’ shooter Michael Drejka says ‘I followed the law’

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(CLEARWATER, Fla.) — Breaking his silence in a jailhouse interview, the white Florida man charged with manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man in a dispute over a parking space says “I cleared every hurdle” of the state’s “stand your ground” self-defense law.Michael Drejka spoke for the first time since being arrested and charged in the July killing of Marquis McGlockton, who was gunned down in front of his girlfriend and children.Drejka, 48, invoked the “stand your ground” law, saying that he was in fear of his life after McGlockton shoved him to the ground when he came out of a convenience store in Clearwater, Florida, to find Drejka allegedly berating his girlfriend, Britany Jacobs, about parking in a handicap space.“I followed the law the way I felt the law was supposed to be followed,” Drejka told ABC affiliate station WTSP-TV in Tampa Bay. “I cleared every hurdle that that law had put in front of me.”Asked if he could go back and change anything he did that fateful day, Drejka said, “No, [not] off the top of my head.”On July 19, Drejka spotted Jacobs sitting in her car parked in a handicap spot outside the Circle A convenience store in Clearwater waiting for McGlockton, the father of her three children, to come out.He said he confronted Jacobs because he has a “pet peeve” about seeing people illegally parked in spots reserved for the disabled.Drejka said he once had a childhood sweetheart who was disabled in a car crash when she was 16, and that his mother-in-law is disabled.“I always said, my whole life is always looking for a handicapped parking spot,” Drejka said in the interview conducted Friday at the Pinellas County Jail, where he is being held on $100,000 bail. “And it just always touched a nerve with me.”Investigators said Drejka, who is not disabled, was alone on the day of the shooting.He denied that the episode with Jacobs and McGlockton had anything to do with race, and said it was “totally false” that he used racial slurs in the encounter with Jacobs or anyone else.Drejka refuted allegations by attorneys for Jacobs and the McGlockton family that he is a racist.“No sir, not by any means,” he said. “I’ve worked with too many people, I’ve met too many people in my life to be that kind of person. There’s no way to survive really by being like that.”Surveillance video taken from in front of the Circle A store showed McGlockton, 28, getting between Drejka and Jacobs, and shoving Drejka to the ground. Drejka, who had a permit to carry a concealed weapon, is seen in the footage pulling a .40-caliber Glock handgun while he was still on the ground and firing it at McGlockton, who appeared to be retreating.The video shows McGlockton being shot once in the left side. Jacobs said she and McGlockton’s 5-year-old son witnessed the shooting.McGlockton stumbled back in the store mortally wounded and later died at a hospital.Drejka said he feared for his life when McGlockton “tackled” him to the ground.“There was only one way to look at that. You have to be scared … because if you’re not and you’re wrong you know … that’s that,” he said. “So, yeah very scared having never been confronted like that or never been assaulted like that if you will.”Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri initially declined to arrest Drejka after the gunman invoked the “stand your ground” defense, saying his decision was bound by the law.Drejka said he felt “vindicated” by Gualtieri’s decision, even as protests broke out in Clearwater and across the nation over the shooting.“I’m a strong supporter of Second Amendment rights and the fact that everybody deserves to feel secure in their person no matter where they go or what they’re doing as long as they’re there legally, of course,” he said. “So yeah, I guess you can say I’m a big supporter of the Second Amendment. I suppose not overtly outspoken about it, but in my heart.”When asked if he could say anything to McGlockton’s loved ones, he initially declined. But later in the interview, he said, “I’m sorry, that’s all I can really say to them.”“And thinking about it, would you accept those kinds of words from someone? I don’t think I would,” he said.He said he was surprised when Pinellas County State Attorney Bernie McCabe filed a manslaughter charge against him on Aug. 13. Drejka denied that he voluntarily turned himself in.“They lied to me,” he said of the detective who arrested him. “And under the guise of returning my property, he requested me to show up at the sheriff’s office to talk to the original detectives.”The only time in the interview that Drejka showed emotion was when he spoke of his wife and children, who he claims have been facing death threats and eviction from their rented home.“I miss my girl. I miss my girls. All of them, yeah,” he said crying.Attorneys for Jacobs and the McGlockton family could not be reached for comment on Sunday. They have previously praised McCabe for filing charges against Drejka while criticizing Sheriff Gualtieri for not arresting Drejka immediately.“I support the state attorney’s decision and will have no further comment as the case continues to work its way through the criminal justice system,” Gualtieri said in a statement after Drejka was charged with manslaughter.Jacobs’ attorney, Benjamin Crump, has called Drejka a “self-appointed wannabe cop” who attempted to “hide behind ‘stand your ground’ to defend his indefensible actions.”“I have full faith that this truth will prevail to punish this cold-blooded killer who angrily created the altercation that led to Markeis’ needless death,” Crump said the day Drejka was charged. “We will continue to fight until justice is brought for the family of Markeis McGlockton.”Drejka has plead not guilty to the charge and has a pre-trial hearing scheduled for Oct. 19.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Bush grandkids recall 41’s ‘incredibly goofy’ side

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — While he was the serious leader of the free world, to Ashley and Marshall Bush, former President George H.W. Bush was the lovable, joke-cracking granddad who attended their school plays and even had a cameo in one of their high school musicals.In an interview Monday on ABC’s Good Morning America, the two granddaughters of the 41st president of the United States, who died Friday at the age of 94, said the biggest lesson he taught them was “humility.”“A couple of years ago I sat down and asked him a few questions. I was just so struck by his humility at one question, in particular. I asked what had impacted him the most in his life and he talked about when he was a 20-year-old pilot and he teared up … and how that had sort of motivated and inspired him for the rest of his life,” Ashley Bush, 29, told ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos.She recalled her grandfather and grandmother, former first lady Barbara Bush, who died in April, always being there to support them.“I mean, our grandfather belonged, of course, to us, but also to the world,” said Ashley Bush, 29, the daughter of Neil Bush. “But yet he would have these moments and come to our plays and even make cameos in our high school musical. It’s very grounded. While he was part of the whole world, he was very grounded and certainly made us all feel very loved and made us feel very special.”Marshall Bush, 32, the daughter of the Marvin Bush, recalled visiting her grandparents in Washington.“As crazy as it sounds, it was very normal for me because when I was born he was in the vice president’s house, and then from about 3 to 7 [year old], he was in the White House,” Marshall Bush said. “So, really to me, and again it’s completely bizarre, but the White House was just my grandfather’s house, my grandparents’ house, where they lived and where I went and hung out with them, went swimming in their pool and played with their dogs. It was normal life to me. It’s just how it was, like anyone going to see their grandparents, with a little extra security.”Marshall described being at her grandfather’s bedside with family and close family friends when the former president took his last breath.“It was just really peaceful,” she said. “I was so happy that I could be there for him and with my family and our closest family friends and just be able to make sure that he knew we were there, he knew we loved him. [We] just comforted him as much as we could and tried and make the very last part of his life as comfortable and loving as he made ours.”Both granddaughters, among the former president’s 14 grandchildren, said they’ll miss his “incredibly goofy side.”“He did a lot of silly, completely ridiculous things just to make sure that we were all smiling and laughing, and having fun,” Marshall said.Ashley added: “He always tried to make us laugh. I feel like, ’till the end, he was cracking jokes.”Marshall said she is “unbelievably lucky” to have had such a granddad.“I could not have had a better influence or really a partner in life,” she said. “He supported us … in every single thing we did. As silly as it was, from our school plays to just having a tough day, he was always there to listen and always there to love.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Customs and Border Protection Commissioner calls influx at remote areas of the border a ‘new phenomenon’ in wake of 7-year-old’s death

first_imgScott Eisen/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Migrants are showing up in groups of 100 or more at remote parts of the U.S.-Mexico border that aren’t equipped to handle the influx, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol Commissioner Kevin McAleenan said Tuesday.It’s a new phenomenon to challenge the agency’s resources shortly after a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl died in U.S. custody.One of the remote locations where agents are under-resourced is at the Lordsburg Border Patrol Station in New Mexico, where 7-year-old Jacklin Caal Maquin was held hours before she died.  McAleenan visited the station Tuesday with members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. They went with the intent to find out more about the circumstances of Maquin’s death, which is now the subject of an ongoing investigation by the Department of Homeland Security’s Inspector General.“The crossings in this area are up tenfold since 2014,” McAleenan said on a call with reporters after the visit. “This is an area that saw very few crossings per day, on average, in any prior year of reference. So this is a very different phenomenon.”In a phone interview from outside the facility, Rep. Lou Correa, D-California, said the tour confirmed what McAleenan described and that it was clear Border Patrol agents are “not prepared to address this refugee crisis.”“The mission has changed completely,” Correa said. “They are going from stopping drugs to addressing a humanitarian issue of refugees coming to our southern region.”Beginning in mid-October and reaching a peak in December, the agency started to see “extremely large groups” arriving several times a week and consisting mostly of families and unaccompanied children, McAleenan said.In the last three days, they’ve seen two groups of more than 200 people, he said, while the Lordsburg station is staffed with about four agents at a time, usually on eight-day rotations.He said groups are largely traveling from Guatemala to the New Mexico border by bus, often for four or five days at a time and for 16-hour stretches. According to McAleenan, the “new smuggling cycle” involves more families and unaccompanied children.“A group as large as 250, you’re going to have medical issues,” McAleenan said. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus members who toured the facilities described it as unconscionable and emotional, urging for a reorganization of resources that would address what they called a “humanitarian crisis.”Correa, who said he spoke with Border Patrol agents about where they needed resources, said they told him they “weren’t ready” for what they were facing. When asked about a border wall, they said they didn’t see it as “brick and mortar” but as more resources.“They said we want better equipment, more personnel, we want to do our job. They said that’s what a border wall should be,” Correa said.  Rep. Ben Ray Luján, D-New Mexico, described “inhumane” cells inside Lordsburg, with a mix of adults and children who shared a single toilet.Chairman-elect of the caucus, Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, said a range of systemic failures in Maquin’s case and at facilities near the border should lead to McAleenan’s resignation.Rep. Raul Ruiz, D-California, who worked as an emergency room doctor, spoke to the specifics of Maquin’s death, the handling of her care and the equipment he saw at the port of entry where she was apprehended and at Lordsburg, where she was eventually taken.“What I’ve found here is there are some really serious systemic obstacles, and problems, and failures in the system, to provide the care that a child so lovingly deserves when they’re in our custody,” Ruiz said at the press conference outside the facility.He called for complete physical examinations of any “vulnerable populations,” including young children,” that come through the ports of entry. Had this been done, he said, Maquin could have been airlifted to a hospital sooner. Ruiz and other members of Congress called for an independent investigation into the healthcare resources at the border.“It’s sad that Jaklin’s death had to happen to bring all of us here again to refocus on the issue of the border and the border wall, and I say that with anger because of what’s happening in Washington right now,” Correa said. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Second suspect in killing of 7-year-old Texas girl denies involvement in shooting: Attorney

first_imgFedorovekb/iStock(HOUSTON) — A man suspected of firing the shots that killed 7-year-old Jazmine Barnes as she rode in a car in Houston with her mother and sisters has denied any involvement in the tragic episode, his attorney said Thursday.Larry Woodruffe, 24, was arraigned Thursday in a Houston courtroom on a capital murder charge and a judge ruled there is probable cause to hold him for trial.Woodruffe is the second suspect charged with capital murder in the case. His alleged accomplice, Eric Black Jr., 20, who was charged last week, allegedly told investigators that he was driving a rental car when Woodruffe opened fire on the vehicle occupied by Jazmine and her family.Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez has said that Jazmine and her family were targeted in a case of “mistaken identity.”Lisa Andrews, Woodruffe’s court-appointed attorney, said Woodruffe denies any involvement in the killing and that he told police he was not in the car with Black when Jazmine was shot.Andrews noted that the only person who has identified Woodruffe as the shooter is Black.“I can tell you, the only person who says that is the person who got charged first. My experience is that people have a big motive to get themselves out of hot water,” Andrews told reporters following Thursday’s court hearing.Jazmine’s life was cut short on Dec. 30, when a gunman opened fire on her family’s car in northwest Houston. Jazmine, who was sitting in the backseat, was shot in the head and killed, while her mother, LaPorsha Washington, was wounded in the left arm.The Harris County Sheriff’s Office launched a massive manhunt for a suspect initially described by Jazmine’s 15-year-old sister Alxis and three other independent witnesses as a white man driving a red pickup truck.But a tip shared with social justice activist and journalist Shaun King led to a stunning break in the case last week and helped investigators identify Black and Woodruffe as suspects in Jazmine’s death, authorities said.Following his arrest, police say Black directed police to a 9mm handgun at his house that was used in the killing.“It is my experience that after 20 years of doing criminal law on both sides that shooters don’t give up their gun and that gun [Black] led the cops to was at his house, not my client’s,” Andrews said. “So I think that’s pretty telling, but we’ll have to see what the evidence shows down the road.”Black’s court-appointed attorney, Alvin Nunnery, did not respond to requests for comment from ABC News.During Thursday’s hearing, Andrews filed a motion for a change of venue due to pre-trial publicity. She also asked Judge Latosha Lewis to remind prosecutors of their “ethical responsibilities regarding pre-trial publicity.”“Specifically, my concerns are that some of our local leaders are taking steps, posting things on social media that I believe are unprofessional and inappropriate given their position of investigating the case and prosecuting the case. It’s causing a lot of negative feelings, publicity and I believe that it is prejudicing the potential jury pool,” Andrews said.She also suggested that it was inappropriate for Sheriff Gonzalez to speak at Jazmine’s funeral on Tuesday.“While that’s a heartwarming gesture … he’s still the person in charge of investigating this case and actions like that don’t seem objective or unbiased,” Andrews said.Tom Berg, the first assistant district attorney in Harris County, described Andrews’ court motions as “premature.”“By the time this case comes to trial we expect to be able to draw a fair panel and get a fair jury for a fair trial,” Berg told reporters. “We intend to try this case on the evidence and from the extent that the defendants have anything to be concerned about it’s going to be on the evidence that’s presented before a jury in this case and not tweets that were made months earlier by other people unrelated to it.”The high-profile shooting case prompted an outpouring of support for Jazmine’s loved ones from people across the nation, including celebrities like Houston Texans wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins, former NBA great Shaquille O’Neal and actresses Gabrielle Union and Olivia Wilde.O’Neal and Hopkins helped cover the expense of Jazmine’s funeral.O’Neal told ABC News Radio on Wednesday that he was disturbed by Jazmine’s death and wanted to take action.“Funerals… ten, fifteen thousand [dollars], that’s not going to hurt me, but for people to have to try to scrum money together to bury their little, beautiful daughter… nobody should ever have to go through that. So, I didn’t want them to have to go through that… It was just the right thing to do,” O’Neal said.“I’m watching the news, and I saw the story, and it just touched my heart,” he said. “And I saw how devastated that mom was. And then to end the story… they had to raise money for the funeral? I can’t have that.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Harvey Weinstein now scheduled to stand trial for rape and sexual assault in September

first_imgStephanie Keith/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Harvey Weinstein is now scheduled to stand trial for rape and sexual assault in September, three months later than initially planned. The judge set a new date of Sept. 9 for a trial that attorneys said is expected to last about a month.Jury selection is expected to last two weeks.Judge James Burke indicated he has decided whether to allow testimony from women other than the two whose allegations form the basis of the criminal case. He declined to reveal his decision in open court.While lawyers argued whether evidence of Weinstein’s alleged prior bad acts can be admitted, Burke ordered the courtroom sealed at the request of both the defense and the prosecutors. Burke said it was the only way to assure Weinstein’s right to have his criminal trial heard by an impartial jury. He did acknowledge the information would include allegations of rape and sexual assault that were never charged by the DA.The defense said the damage of unsubstantiated allegations should be kept from an insatiable media.News organizations including ABC News fought unsuccessfully to keep the courtroom open.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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‘Joker’ movie prompts mass shooting threat at US movie theaters

first_imgRgStudio/iStock(LAWTON, Okla.) — The soon-to-released psychological thriller Joker starring Oscar-nominated actor Joaquin Phoenix has prompted a “credible potential mass shooting” threat on a movie theater somewhere in the United States, military officials warned in a memorandum issued this week.The alarming notice was sent out on Monday by military officials at Fort Sills Army base in Oklahoma, and was based on intelligence gathered by the FBI from the “disturbing and very specific” chatter of alleged extremists on the dark web, officials said.The movie, which won the Golden Lion for Best Film at the Venice International Film Festival in Italy earlier this month, is scheduled to be released nationwide on Oct. 4.“Commanders need to be aware of this threat for Soldier and family safety and to increase situational awareness should they choose to attend the release of this movie at a local theater,” reads the memorandum obtained by ABC affiliate state KSWO-TV in Lawton, Okla.The threat warranted the “widest dissemination” to the Fort Sills community although it was not directed at a specific theater.The threat stirred fears of a repeat of the Sept. 20, 2012, mass shooting that left 12 people dead and 70 injured during a screening in Aurora, Colo., of The Dark Knight Rises, another film about the same fictional Batman villain that won Heath Ledger a posthumous Academy Award.Disturbed by the violence depicted in a trailer for the Joker, loved ones of those killed in the massacre at the Aurora movie theater sent the film’s distributor, Warner Brothers, a letter on Tuesday asking the studio to commit to gun control causes.“Keeping everyone safe should be a top corporate priority for Warner Brothers,” the letter reads.The movie theater in Aurora, where the 2012 mass shooting occurred, has chosen not to screen the Joker, according to The Hollywood Reporter.In a statement to ABC News, Warner Brothers said the film is fictional and not a glorification of “real-world violence.”“Gun violence in our society is a critical issue, and we extend our deepest sympathy to all victims and families impacted by these tragedies,” Warner Brothers’ statement reads. “Make no mistake: Neither the fictional character Joker, nor the film, is an endorsement of real world violence of any kind.”The Aurora movie theater where the 2012 mass shooting occurred has apparently chosen not to screen the Joker, according to The Hollywood Reporter.Christopher Grey, a spokesman for the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command, said the memorandum sent out by Fort Sill was done “out of an abundance of caution.”Brad Garrett, a former FBI special agent and ABC News contributor, said on Good Morning America on Thursday that such warnings are becoming more frequent.“As law enforcement has moved through so many mass shootings and so many other types of violence, that when they get intelligence, even if it’s not specific, they will pass it on to local or state authority just so they are aware,” Garrett said.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Melinda Gates pledges $1 billion to promote gender equality

first_imgiStock(NEW YORK) — Melinda Gates has pledged to donate a whopping $1 billion to promote gender equality in the United States.The famous philanthropist made the announcement in an op-ed published on Time’s website on Wednesday, stating that only one CEO of a list of 500 is a woman and that although women make up 51% of the American population, just 24% of the seats in Congress are held by them.“My reaction to facts like these is a complicated mix of outrage and optimism. I imagine I’m not alone,” Gates wrote. “It’s frustrating — even heartbreaking — to confront evidence of the many ways our country continues to hold women back.”Gates wrote that the fact that people are talking about issues surrounding gender inequality is a “sign of progress,” but she fears that the moment will not “last forever.”“I imagine waking up one morning to find that the country has moved on,” she said. “That the media has stopped reporting on systemic inequalities. That diversity remains something companies talk about instead of prioritizing. That all of this energy and attention has amounted to a temporary swell instead of a sea change.”Gates’ $1 billion contribution to “expanding women’s power and influence in the United States” will be donated over the next 10 years, she said.She will use her company, Pivotal Ventures, to put resources behind “new and established partners taking innovative and diverse approaches to expanding women’s power and influence.”“I want to see more women in the position to make decisions, control resources, and shape policies and perspectives,” she wrote. “I believe that women’s potential is worth investing in — and the people and organizations working to improve women’s lives are, too.”While Gates admitted that the donation is “a lot of money,” she described her contribution as “only a small fraction of what’s necessary.”Gates and her husband, Bill Gates, often donate large sums of money to charitable causes through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Alleged cop shooter with a ‘grudge’ indicted by grand jury

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A grand jury in the Bronx has indicted a man accused of trying to murder New York Police Department officers during a 12-hour shooting rampage.Robert Williams allegedly opened fire inside the 41st Precinct on Feb. 9, after walking up to a marked police vehicle and shooting inside it the day before. Officer Paul Stroffolino was struck in the neck during the Feb. 8 incident, and Lt. Jose Gautreaux was hit in the arm at the precinct.Both officers have since been released from the hospital.Williams, 45, was charged on two separate complaints, and on Friday afternoon a grand jury indicted him for the caught-on-camera shooting at the Longwood Avenue precinct.Prosecutors with the Bronx District Attorney’s Office announced in front of a courtroom filled with dozens of the officers’ colleagues that Williams was indicted on 11 counts of attempted murder of a police officer, 12 counts of attempted murder and criminal possession of a weapon.A second grand jury for Stroffolino’s case is expected to announce its findings at a later time.Family and friends of Williams who were also in court on Friday told ABC New York station WABC that he’s suffered from emotional distress since his son died in 2018.Police sources previously said Williams allegedly said he was holding a grudge against police since a 2018 DWI arrest.Williams is expected back in court March 6 for his supreme court arraignment and to enter a plea.If convicted for attempted murder of a police office, he faces 25 years to life in prison for each count. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Retired state trooper who responded to Sandy Hook shooting dies of COVID-19

first_imgCT State Police/TwitterBy NICOLE PELLETIERE, ABC News(HARTFORD, Conn.) — A retired Connecticut state trooper who was a first responder to the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting has died after battling COVID-19, according to police officials.Patrick Dragon died Jan. 2, 2021, at Hartford Hospital. The 50-year-old was working as a deputy chief of the East Brooklyn Fire Department and a police dispatcher in Foster, Rhode Island, before his death.In a recent Facebook post, Chief David J. Breit of the Foster Police Department said Dragon was a “great person, kind, caring and a friend to all who met him.”“There are not enough words, to describe the kind of person that Patrick was. The men and women of the Foster Police Department, express our deepest sympathies to Patrick’s family,” Breit wrote, also confirming in the post that Dragon died as a result of COVID-19.Dragon was a member of the 107th Training Troop and entered the State Police Training Academy on Jan. 9, 1998, according to Connecticut State Police.After graduating from the academy, Dragon served as a patrol trooper in Danielson, a resident trooper in the town of Sterling, a detective in the Eastern District Major Crime Squad and a detective in the Fire and Explosion Investigation Unit.Dragon was also among the first to respond to the Sandy Hook shooting in Newtown, where 20 children and six educators were killed on Dec. 14, 2012, after a gunman opened fire inside the grade school.Dragon retired from the police force in 2018.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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International news: world must equip women

first_imgInternational news: world must equip womenOn 13 Jun 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. • Minister for Women Margaret Jay told a United Nations special session on gender equality in New York last week that world leaders must improve women’s choices and opportunities in education and training. “We must equip women to play a full and equal part in the 21st century economy by lifelong learning programmes which include the new technologies and the new skills.” At the conference, the minister launched a report of the UK’s work done to improve women’s lives worldwide through its development work. www.undp.org/gender/Good relations with manager keep staff in jobs• A Gallup survey carried out in the US confirms that employees tend to stay in jobs where they are supervised by empathetic bosses. According the poll, employees’ length of tenure is determined by the nature of their relationships with their bosses. Charles O’Reilly, a visiting professor at Harvard Business School, told the New York Times, “It’s taken a tight labour market for employers to think through the social contract they are striking with people. When job opportunities are plentiful, people with crummy bosses leave.”www.shrm.org/ebulletin/issuesAnti-bias moves welcomed – with provisos• The European Union’s economic and social committee said it “broadly welcomes” the European Commission’s package of anti-discrimination measures but has set out six areas for change. It says that in the framework directive on equal treatment in employment and occupation that employers should be liable for harassment only in situations which are clearly under the employer’s control and where the employer knows about the harassment and has allowed the harassment to continue. And it suggests that more effort should be given to researching and developing the benefits which equality of opportunity can bring to business. www.eiro.eurofound.ielast_img read more

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