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Liturgical seamstress celebrates 20 years of service at Basilica of the Sacred Heart

first_imgFor the last 20 years, Patti Schlarb has served as the liturgical seamstress for the Basilica of the Sacred Heart — a role that has not only brought her across campus, but across the globe as well.In her role as liturgical seamstress, Schlarb is responsible for handcrafting the vestments and other decor for the Basilica and all the chapels on campus. Not only does she make items for Notre Dame, she also covers the needs of the University of Portland and the Holy Cross Missions in Chile, Uganda, Kenya and Mexico.But her work does not stop there.“I also am sailing on the seven seas, because I’ve made albs for the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan [which] used to have a C.S.C. chaplain … I’m all over the world,” Schlarb said.Liturgical seamstress Patti Schlarb has been handcrafting religious vestments for the Basilica and campus chapels for the past 20 years.Before coming to work at Notre Dame, Schlarb ran her own tailoring business for 20 years.“It just so happened that one of my clients that I had at my tailoring business was Fr. [Peter] Rocca’s secretary, and Brother Dennis Meyers who used to be here asked her if she knew anybody that sewed. So, she gave him my name,” Schlarb said.After three job interviews, during which Schlarb said she “was scared to death,” she started working at the Basilica. After 20 years in the position, Schlarb estimated she has made up to 100 vestments and 5,000 albs, on top of numerous other projects.Currently, Schlarb is right in the middle of her “busy season,” — preparing for Easter celebrations.“It’s one of those things I just have to keep going on each project that I work on, and I do it kind of like in a piece by piece,” she said. “I get one vestment done, I get the altar cloth done and I check them off my list. So as my time goes on, it usually takes me about 12 weeks to get ready for Easter.”After finishing her work for Easter, she then moves on to preparations for Holy Cross priestly ordinations.“We have five that are going to be ordained this year, so I have five vestments to make for them, and they’re all custom-made for each one of them — and yes, they take them with them, and they take them all over the world, no matter where they’re at,” she said. “I find it’s kind of a privilege because I basically go along with them wherever they are. It’s a good feeling for the ministry to do that.”Schlarb said not many people think of all the work that occurs behind the scenes in preparation for the different celebrations.“It’s very busy, and I think that most people don’t realize that everything is made here at the Basilica,” she said. “They just think that they open up a catalog and they buy it and it just appears, but that’s not the way it is. Everything that I make here is very unique, and is designed for the Basilica … I do a lot of things that nobody knows that I do. And even when somebody needs a button sewed on, I do that, too.”Her favorite part of working at the Basilica, she said, is working with the seminarians.“Seeing them come in … they really don’t know what’s going on, and by the time they become priests, they have grown so much and accomplished so much and it’s almost like I’m a proud mama, because they are like my children,” Schlarb said. “Because I’ve seen them for the last 10 years of becoming a priest. It’s very gratifying for me.”Schlarb said one of the most memorable moments from her years working as the liturgical seamstress was when she was given the opportunity to make the vestments used for the inaugural Mass of Fr. John Jenkins as president of the University.“He allowed me to go in and help vest him, and he signed a program for me and took pictures,“ Schlarb said. “I felt very very blessed doing that.”Schlarb’s work has even been worn by recipients of the Laetare Medal.“Four years ago the President’s Office called me and wanted me to design a ribbon that they could put [the Laetare Medal] on so they could put it around the neck like they do the congressional medals … so I designed that, and it’s now a tradition that they use that every year for the Laetare medal,“ she said. ”And the first two that were given out was Vice President Biden and House Speaker Boehner. They both have one of my ribbons.”Schlarb said she feels blessed to have worked at the Basilica for 20 years.“I know my business very well. It’s a very gratifying job, I’m not the type of person that needs a pat on the back,” Schlarb said. “I know what I do, and I know the quality of work that I do, and just to be at Mass and to see my creations and how much everybody enjoys it — that’s my gratitude that I get back. … I love my job. You can tell that. I do. I love what I do, and there aren’t too many people that say that they love their job. I really do love it.”Tags: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, liturgical seamstress, Patti Schlarblast_img read more

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Wayne Brady Gets Ready to Enter the Land of Lola in Kinky Boots

first_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019 Kinky Boots Related Shows Shazam and bam! Wayne Brady is getting ready to join the Tony-winning musical Kinky Boots. Before starting rehearsals next week, Brady prepared himself by attending Michelle Obama’s bicep bootcamp stepping into Gregg Barnes’ fabulous costumes for the character of Lola. The multi-talented Brady’s first performance in the feel-good show is November 21. (Tony-winning Broadway.com vlogger Billy Porter will play his final performance the day before.) Everybody say yeah and welcome Brady back to Broadway! last_img read more

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Corn Maze

first_imgIn a southeast Georgia corn field, University of Georgia students helped to design a corn maze in honor of Mark Richt, UGA Bulldogs head football coach, using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. As part of a precision agriculture class taught on the UGA Tifton Campus, students are learning the benefits of this technology while preparing for future agricultural careers. George Vellidis, a UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences crop and soil sciences professor, gave his precision agriculture students the opportunity to experience GPS technology firsthand by having them develop a corn maze at Rutland Farms in Tifton, Georgia.“I’ve been teaching precision agriculture at the UGA Tifton Campus since 2003. We’ve been teaching GPS from day one because GPS is a critical part of precision agriculture. Everything we do with precision agriculture has coordinates, so we can collect our data through GPS,” Vellidis said. “It’s a great experience for the students to go out and help with the corn maze. They get to do a fun activity while learning how to use GPS.”Ryan Rutland, a UGA CAES alumnus, and his wife, Meredith, designed the corn maze. In its fifth year, this year’s maze was created in Richt’s likeness. Covering 6.1 acres, the maze is the biggest ever constructed at Rutland Farms and is the most publicized. In September, ESPN ran a story about the maze on espn.go.com. Ryan says this was probably the most difficult maze ever built at Rutland Farms and gives all credit to Vellidis and his students.“Dr. Vellidis has partnered with us since we started in 2011. His class helps us by taking a perimeter of the field where we’ve planted the corn, putting an image on paper, then they transfer that image into the GPS,” he said. “They help us trace the lines and mow everything. They pretty much help us with the maze from start to finish.”Students have been impressed by how easy the technology is to use and how beneficial it can be to farmers. “I’ve used it to go back after we’ve already installed moisture sensors earlier in the season and I’ve used it to find the sensors much later in the season,” said Sydni Barwick, Vellidis’ student and student worker in irrigation for UGA Cooperative Extension. “When, for example, a corn crop is 8 feet high, you can’t see across that field, so there’s no way to find the sensors without GPS. Using the (GPS) system is great for things like that because it has an accuracy of about 3 feet,” she said.As far as precision agriculture, GPS allows farmers and researchers to make maps of data collected from fields. “The maps are then used to make decisions about how to vary the amount of crop inputs applied to different areas of the field,” Vellidis said. Like most other technology, there is a chance that students can experience trouble with GPS. Vellidis prepares his students to face possible technical difficulties.“The main thing is for them to understand all the problems they’ll run into, to understand how the technology works, to understand how to solve the problems associated with GPS. For example, cables might be disconnected or the electronics might not be speaking to each other,” he said. “So, I just want to get them familiar with how everything works.”UGA student Randall Stratton used the GPS technology for the first time in Vellidis’ precision agriculture class.“I found the GPS lab very interesting because it showed us how to work the GPS equipment, first off, and then it was important to know the uses of this in case future jobs involved GPS like what we had in class,” Stratton said.For now, Vellidis’ class is basking in the recognition that comes from creating a one-of-a-kind maze. “It was interesting; you have pride there for sure,” said Evan Hill, a junior agriscience student in Vellidis’ class.(Tatyana Phelps is an intern on the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

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Op-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways

first_imgOp-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享San Diego Union Tribune:Now that President Donald Trump has enfeebled the Environmental Protection Agency, reversed climate regulations opposed by fossil fuel interests and announced U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord, it is right to examine whether his agenda on climate change really puts “America first,” which he so often proclaims is his overriding goal. In four critical areas, it does not.Our public health: The Trump agenda apparently disregards that the burning of fossil fuels spews volumes of gases and particulates into the air that are toxic to human health. Numerous studies show that the most severe effects include acute and chronic bronchitis, asthma attacks, lead and heavy metals poisoning, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, heart attacks and premature death, with those most vulnerable to these ills being the elderly and our children.Moreover, pollution from the burning of fossil fuels costs billions of dollars in health care costs that are “hidden” in that they are not reflected in the market price for these fuels. These “hidden” costs include lost work days, increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations, increased insurance premiums and the overall growth in our national health care costs. In a 2009 report requested by Congress, the National Academy of Sciences estimated that in 2005 alone these costs were more than $120 billion.Our economy: Although President Trump proclaims he will bring back jobs by cutting environmental regulations, the evidence shows that new clean-energy technologies and the industries formed around them create far more jobs than are lost in the transition from burning fossil fuels.According to a 2015 report by the Environmental Defense Fund, based upon Department of Energy data, clean energy jobs already outnumbered those in fossil fuel by more than 2.5 to 1 and were growing at a rate 12 times faster than the rest of the U.S. economy. In a 2017 report, the Department of Energy predicts that energy-efficient employment will grow at the rate of 9 percent in the next 12 months, faster than any other energy sector.Our national security: Trump’s agenda also ignores a stark warning from the Department of Defense contained in a 2015 report requested by Congress, “National Security Implications of Climate-Related Risks and a Changing Climate.”The report goes straight to the heart of the matter: “DoD recognizes the reality of climate change and the significant risk it poses to U.S. interests globally. The National Security Strategy, issued in February 2015, is clear that climate change is an urgent and growing threat to our national security, contributing to increased natural disasters, refugee flows, and conflicts over basic resources such as food and water. These impacts are already occurring, and the scope, scale, and intensity of these impacts are projected to increase over time.”Our global leadership: President Trump has announced that the U.S., the world’s largest polluter after China, will withdraw from the 2015 Paris climate accord, an international agreement, signed by the United States with 196 other countries, which commits the world community to a concerted effort in combating climate change. Our withdrawal would leave the U.S. isolated as one of a tiny handful of nations in the world that is not a member the pact.China, however, has signed the agreement and sees climate action as a way to fill the leadership vacuum left by the U.S., announcing plans to invest more than $360 billion in renewable energy by the end of this decade. Moreover, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, China is accelerating its foreign investments in renewable technologies and related equipment, a growing international market in which China may soon become the dominant player.Our announced withdrawal from the Paris agreement amounts to abdication of leadership in the global effort to combat climate change, at our cost and to China’s benefit.Let it therefore be said that President Trump’s agenda on climate change not only fails to put “America first” by ignoring the hard facts, it also puts in jeopardy our critical interests as a nation both at home and in the global arena.How Trump is failing to put America firstlast_img read more

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Secrets to successful social business campaigns with Navy Federal Credit Union’s Michael Toner

first_img 54SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In the finicky world of social media, selling is a big “no-no.” If you try to sell anything on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and the like, your followers will leave you faster than moviegoers emptying the seats after the first five minutes of Meatballs 2. That was a bad movie.But the folks at Navy Federal Credit Union have become immune to this social selling repugnancy. In fact, they’ve become pretty darn good at generating revenue in the social media realm. If you recall, we had Navy Fed’s Jennifer Sadler on the show (episode #233) last year sharing how the credit union generated over $200 million in loans from its Facebook page. continue reading »last_img read more

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CUNA’s Nussle, Donovan, Gose talk post-election picture for CUs

first_imgCUNA staff prepares for a post-election webinar breaking down Tuesday’s election results. Credit unions are well positioned after Tuesday’s election into the 116th Congress, CUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle said during CUNA’s post-election webinar Thursday. Nussle was joined by Chief Advocacy Officer Ryan Donovan and Chief Political Officer Richard Gose to break down the election results, which can also be found in great detail in CUNA’s post-election whitepaper.“In the wake of this election, our goal remains the same, to move forward in the best interests of America’s credit unions,” said CUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle. “CUNA, our political action committee – the Credit Union Legislative Action Committee (CULAC) invested nearly $7 million in 388 House and Senate races this year, we’ve won 349 of them, with the total number to rise as more races are called. That’s an incredibly strong performance and ensures that we will have a credit union friendly Congress. I cannot stress enough the great work all of us did to ensure we had a successful outcome.”Gose credited CUNA’s Member Activation Program and CUNA’s league partners and credit unions for generating “Get Out The Vote” buzz using CUNA’s “Credit Unions Vote” MAP Campaign, which CUNA launched in September. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img continue reading »last_img read more

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Broome County breaks record for highest number of virus cases reported

first_img(WBNG) — Broome County reported 50 more COVID-19 cases on Thursday from Wednesday, bringing the county total to 243 active cases. This is the highest number of cases ever recorded for the county. He also said over 1,000 county residents are in quarantine. 104 of those cases are located in Binghamton. Broome County Executive Jason Garnar tweeted Thursday that the county was training more contact tracers to manage the recent spike in cases. To see where cases are located in the county, click here. The number of people hospitalized did not see an increase. That number remained at eight from Wednesday into Thursday. In his Wednesday news conference, Garnar said the rise in cases is tied to bars and restaurants on the west side of Bingamton.last_img read more

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Iraq lawmakers approve government of Prime Minister-designate Kadhimi

first_imgKadhimi’s candidates for Cabinet posts including interior, defence, finance and electricity passed with votes from a majority of lawmakers present.Voting on the oil and foreign ministries was delayed as the parties failed to agree on candidates. They rejected the incoming premier’s picks for justice, agriculture and trade.”The security, stability and blossoming of Iraq is our path,” Kadhimi wrote on his Twitter account after parliament voted for his Cabinet.He said he would make tackling the coronavirus pandemic, of which Iraq has suffered more than 2,000 cases and more than 100 deaths, a priority and hold to account those who had killed protesters in previous months of anti-government unrest.Iraqi officials say Kadhimi is acceptable to both the United States and Iran, whose battle for influence over Iraq has boiled into open confrontation in the past year.The United States killed Iranian military mastermind Qassem Soleimani and his close ally the Iraqi paramilitary leader Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis in a drone strike next to Baghdad International Airport in January.Iran responded with its first ever direct missile attack against US forces at a base in Western Iraq several days later but did not kill anyone.Washington accuses paramilitary groups backed by Tehran of carrying out a series of rocket attacks on other bases in recent months, one of which killed three troops in the US-led military coalition based in Iraq.Rockets have regularly been fired near the US embassy in Baghdad. None of the rocket attacks have been claimed by known Iran-backed groups.Kadhimi’s government must deal with an impending economic crisis precipitated by the coronavirus pandemic, which has caused the prices of oil – Iraq’s principal source of revenue – to plummet.It also faces a growing Islamic State insurgency as the extremist group steps up attacks on government troops from hideouts in remote areas of northern Iraq.Iraq risks being caught up in any regional conflagration between Washington and Tehran, as militia groups vow revenge for the killing of Soleimani and Muhandis and President Donald Trump continues his bellicose rhetoric against Iran. Topics : Iraqi lawmakers approved a new government on Wednesday after six months without one as parties squabbled until the last minute over Cabinet seats in backroom deals.Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi, Iraq’s intelligence chief and a former journalist, will head the new government. He will begin his term without a full Cabinet, however, after several ministerial candidates were rejected.US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo welcomed the new government in a call with Kadhimi, the US State Department said in a statement. It also said Washington would renew for 120 days a waiver allowing Iraq to import electricity from Iran “to help provide the right conditions for success” of the new government.Former prime minister Adel Abdul Mahdi, who has been leading a caretaker government, resigned last year as anti-government protesters took to the streets in their thousands, demanding jobs and the departure of Iraq’s ruling elite.They accuse the political class that took over after the 2003 US invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein of corruption that has driven the country into dysfunction and economic ruin.The battle over government portfolios since Abdul Mahdi’s resignation in November prevented two previous nominees for prime minister from forming a Cabinet.last_img read more

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‘Reinfected’ North Sumatra COVID-19 patient ‘feels fine, but stressed’

first_imgHe added that his biggest challenge was coping with stress during treatment to bolster his immune system. He also thanked his family, friends and his boss for their support as he recovered from the disease.Read also: Indonesia to revise ‘overall data’ on COVID-19 cases as govt scrambles to ramp up testingOri is being treated at Martha Friska Hospital in the provincial capital.Ori was said to have recovered fully from COVID-19 on April 6 by doctors at Adam Malik Hospital in Medan after undergoing isolation since March 25. He was then believed to have contracted the virus while on duty, accompanying Musa Rajekshah on his official trip to Jakarta. Ori Kurniawan, the first Indonesian patient who has been reportedly reinfected with the COVID-19 virus, has said that he generally feels well, but had developed anxiety during his second round of treatment at a hospital in Medan.”I feel healthy, but I feel stressed out,” Ori told North Sumatra COVID-19 task force spokesman Whiko Irwan during a teleconference on Saturday.Ori, 25, who is an aide to North Sumatra Deputy Governor Musa Rajekshah, said that he had not developed any symptoms after he tested positive for the virus for a second time. After being declared negative, Ori had not been self-isolating but instead went to his hometown in Bireun regency, Aceh and had allegedly met with his colleagues when he was at home.North Sumatra COVID-19 task force spokesperson Aris Yudhariasyah said that although it was rare, patients who had recovered from COVID-19   could be reinfected with the virus, and asked the public not to panic.Aris said there were three possibilities by which a patient could contract the virus after recovery, with the first being a false test result.”It could be caused by insufficient mucus collected for the swab tests, or [because] the sample contains only the inactive [form of the] virus,” he said.The second possibility, he said, was that the patient still had the virus but that it was dormant, but then it became activate and started replicating due to the patient’s weakened immune system.”If this happens, the patients would likely experience very mild symptoms and their risk of transmitting the disease to other people is very low,” said Aris.Read also: 11 Indonesian migrant workers test positive for COVID-19 upon return from ItalyThe third possibility was that the patients who had recovered were exposed to the six other types of coronavirus known to infect humans, including the SARS virus and the MERS virus.”There is a possibility that the patient’s immune system failed to recognize other types of coronavirus. That’s why it’s important to implement widespread restrictions on social activities,” he said. (nal)Topics :last_img read more

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Clive Palmer settles on $12m jawdropping beach house

first_imgThere is enough room to park eight cars in the basement. Businessman Clive Palmer, pictured here outside the Supreme Court in Brisbane on Monday, now has a beach house on Hedges Ave. Picture: AAP Image/Dave Hunt.CLIVE Palmer’s jawdropping $12m beach house has cleared settlement just a month after he fell in love with it — boxing ring, fully aircon gym, 22m lap pool and all.The five bedroom designer home is in one of the most coveted parts of the Gold Coast in the exclusive seaside strip of Hedges Avenue in Mermaid Beach. The Hedges Avenue home is one of the most beautiful on the millionaire strip. The home has 20m of beach frontage. The views are breathtaking and the home makes stunning use of indoor-outdoor flow over its 810 sqm double block. It has 20 metres of beach frontage. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK The multistorey property had a stunning $12m price tag. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59 “It’s one of the most iconic Hamptons style homes on the beachfront there and one of the first to have been built on the beachfront using that style of architecture on Mermaid Beach,” Mr Velissariou said. The property was listed to be in the region of $11.1-12.9 million that the former owner John Potter wanted. He had been keen on selling the property since 2015, but hadn’t been actively marketing it this year, according to CoreLogic.Agent Tony Velissariou of Tony V reportedly pitched it to Mr Palmer when he was discussing a beach home last month. RELATED: Billionaire Clive Palmer’s latest purchase marks highest sale on the Gold Coast in 2018 The gym is fully airconditioned and has a boxing ring. The home also has an impressive wine cellar. Cupcake queen’s sweet dealJames Packer splashes $80m on new homeSnowboard champ’s new hideaway The home embraces indoor-outdoor flow.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa15 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago The property, listed as “the Gold Coast’s most admired beachfront home”, closed a week ago.Among its charms were an eight car basement for parking, five master bedrooms, an opulent kitchen, wine cellar and elevator, and even an observatory with ensuite that doubles as an office. Every bedroom has an ensuite.last_img read more

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