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A New School Has Emerged In The Race For Country’s No. 1 Overall Recruit

first_imgKayvon Thibodeaux runs drills in a campThe No. 1 overall recruit in the 2019 class is likely a couple of months away from making a decision on where he’ll be playing his college football. Here’s the latest on his impending decision.A new school appears to be emerging in the race.USC is believed to be the favorite to land the five-star, but another Pac-12 school is starting to get some love.  The Ducks are in play.Thibodeaux says Oregon is making a “big move.”Oregon is making big move? #M19HTYOREGON ?— kayvon thibodeaux (@kayvonT8) June 1, 2018USC, LSU and Florida State are the schools with predictions on 247Sports’ “Crystal Ball.” Oregon doesn’t have any predictions yet, but that could change soon.The five-star defensive lineman has said he plans on making his final decision later this summer. We’re probably a couple of months away from a decision.Stay tuned.last_img read more

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Real Madrid Expresses Concerns Over Rabats Pitch Conditions

Rabat- As a result of the deluge of rain at the “Complexe Sportif Prince Moulay Abdellah” in Rabat, Spanish football team Real Madrid expressed concern regarding the stadium’s conditions.According to Spanish media today, the Real Madrid players will face significant problems in Rabat Stadium in their match in the FIFA Club World Cup against Cruz Azul of Mexico, scheduled on Tuesday.The game between Cruz Azul and the Western Sydney Wanderers (3-1) was played in pouring rain on “a swimming pool of a pitch which quickly turned into a mudbath.” After conditions at the Prince Moulay Abdellah in Rabat worsened, a source from the Royal Football Federation (FRMF) said that the organizing committee of the FIFA Club World Cup and the FIFA delegation in Rabat are considering moving the semi-final match between Real Madrid and Cruz Azul to Marrakesh’s Grand Stadium.Edited by Timothy Filla read more

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Goodman professor to talk Battle of Gettysburg at Royal Canadian Military Institute

The Battle of Gettysburg, and factors of the conflict some argue would have changed the course of history, is at the centre of Michael Armstrong’s research.The associate professor of operations research at Brock’s Goodman School of Business is set to shed light on the 1863 battle during a presentation on Wednesday, April 19 at the Royal Canadian Military Institute in Toronto. Armstrong completed a study, “Refighting Pickett’s Charge: mathematical modeling of the Civil War battlefield”, in 2015 while visiting Norwich University in Northfield, Vt.The study, supported by funding from a 2013-14 Fulbright Scholar award, later won the 2017 Southwestern Social Sciences Association best published paper award. In collaboration with Steven Sodergren, Associate Professor of history at Norwich University, Armstrong developed a mathematical model of Pickett’s Charge to determine if it could have won the Battle of Gettysburg, a turning point in the American Civil War.At the height of battle, General Pickett’s infantry charge failed and forced the Confederate army to retreat south, leading the Union army to take the initiative and eventually win the war.Some historians have argued that Pickett’s Charge would have succeeded if the Confederates had made better decisions.Armstrong and Sodergren’s research used a scientific approach to answer questions about what would have happened if General Lee had assigned more men to Pickett and if Lee’s staff had supplied enough ammunition for a longer artillery barrage.After building the mathematical model of the charge, Armstrong and Sodergren calibrated the model’s equations using troop strengths from the actual fight to ensure they recreated the historical results. After adjusting the model to represent changes in the battle plan, they used the equations to calculate the battle’s likely new outcome.Their model indicated that a longer barrage would have only slightly helped the charge, as it would have needed several thousand more infantry to work. Their findings include that if Lee had added his five reserve brigades to the charge, it likely would have captured the Union position, but that would have left no fresh troops ready to exploit the success. This means the charge itself would have succeeded, but it would not have won the battle.Armstrong notes that this study benefited from mixing scientific methods with humanities viewpoints. This interdisciplinary approach revealed insights that neither specialty could have found on its own.Armstrong’s presentation is open to the public and will take place April 18 at 7:30 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Military Institute in Toronto as part of the organization’s American Civil War roundtable series. read more