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FairPoint to expand broadband coverage to East Dover

first_imgConsolidated Communications,FairPoint Communications, a leading telecommunications provider in northern New England, is working with the town of Dover to bring high-speed Internet access to more than 200 homes and businesses in East Dover for the first time. FairPoint will be in East Dover at the Town Hall on Wednesday, December 7, from 6 to 8:30 pm, to answer questions and start signing up people for high-speed access.Dover town officials turned to FairPoint to expand its VantagePoint services in East Dover where residents do not have high-speed Internet access. VantagePoint services are provided over FairPoint’s IP-based network, the largest network of its kind in northern New England. ‘We understand the critical need for high-speed broadband services for both business and residential needs,’ said Ken Black, economic development specialist with the town of Dover. ‘In an effort to expand this to a group of rural, non-serviced users, the town of Dover approved funds to engage FairPoint to build and supply this capability.’Refreshments will be served and there will be prizes and giveaways for all who join in this high-speed, high-fun event. Interested residents can also find out more about FairPoint’s products and promotions prior to December 7 by calling 877.491.6706, or by requesting a call from a customer service representative through the Contact Us form at www.FairPoint.com/contactus(link is external). The expansion project consists of three zones. FairPoint is finishing work in Zone 1, which includes approximately 120 locations along these streets: Elva’s Way; 77-133 Goose City Road; 141-169 Holland Road; 7-16 Jenne Road; Jockey Hollow; 5-87 Locust; 6-295 North Street; 21-60 Robbins Way; 1-5 Rocky Lane; 6-52 Sherman Road; 11-34 Turner Road; 2-58 Wakelee Road and 15-95 Whites Hill Road. The Dover Select Board approved $59,000 to cover Zone 2, which includes approximately 110 locations along these streets: 6-14 Beech Tree Lane; 1-109 Captain Copeland Road; 5-117 Cooper Hill Road; 178-261A Dover Hill Road; 235 Dover Road; 1-51 Harris Road; 8-100 Higley; 22-109 Holland Road; 5 Morse Road; Rice Hill; 13-14 Robbins Road; 20 Robins Road; 138-193 Taft Brook Road and 6 Timberview Road. Pending town approval, a third project is being considered for 2012 to bring high-speed service to Zone 3, covering approximately 175 locations along these streets: 1-40 Brickyard Road; 90-129 Captain Copeland Road; 15-80 Carroll; 35-160 Dover Hill Road; 23-64 Goose City Road; 52 Harris Road; 12-26 Mandy’s Road; 2-79 North Street; 20-36 O’Neil Road; 8-101 Snow Road; 4-111 Taft Brook Road; 5-11 Thomas Lane and 15-179 Yeaw Road. FairPoint, which completed Vermont’s largest broadband expansion project to date, now provides access to nearly 90 percent of its Vermont customers. ‘This is an exciting opportunity for FairPoint,’ said Mike Smith, Vermont state president. ‘When it comes to getting high-speed access to more Vermonters, FairPoint has led the way. We thank the town of Dover for their confidence in us.’ About FairPoint Communications, Inc.FairPoint Communications, Inc. (NasdaqCM: FRP) is a leading communications provider of high-speed Internet access, local and long-distance phone, television and other broadband services to customers in communities across 18 states. Through its fast, reliable network, FairPoint delivers affordable data and voice networking communications solutions to residential, business and wholesale customers. FairPoint delivers VantagePointSM services through its resilient IP-based network in northern New England. This state-of-the-art network provides Ethernet connections that support video conferencing, e-learning and other broadband based applications. Additional information about FairPoint products and services is available at www.FairPoint.com(link is external). You can also connect with FairPoint on Twitter (http://www.twitter.com/myfairpoint(link is external)) and Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/myfairpoint(link is external)).SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (Nov. 29, 2011) ‘ FairPoint Communications ###last_img read more

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ASBURY PARK POLICE POSSIBLE LACK OF FORCE INVESTIGATED

first_imgTHE MONMOUTH COUNTY Prosecutor’s Office is conducting an Internal Affairs review of whether too little force was used by Asbury Park police at the scene of last week’s shooting by off-duty Neptune Township Police Officer Philip Seidle of his former wife.Acting Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni announced the investigation into the murder of Tamara Wilson-Seidle on the city streets of Asbury Park in broad daylight. Her former husband is accused of firing two volleys from his service weapon, a .40 caliber Glock, into his wife’s car while their youngest child watched from her father’s car.The couple had nine children, age 7 to 24.The investigators were not named but procedure typically dictates the county’s Office of Professional Responsibility and Bias Crime Bureau conduct investiga- tions into police conduct.Two former Asbury Park policemen former Lt. Jeffrey Hughes and former Sgt. Rocco Santorsola, are part of that team, according to the county records.Charles Webster, Public Information Officer for the county Prosecutor’s Office, confirmed the two former Asbury police officers work in the prosecutor’s office but said he did not know the panel members yet.“It would be premature for me to confirm or deny if there were two officers on the review panel because the panel members have not been chosen yet,” he said. “I don’t know if they are on it or not.”“This review will be conducted by our Professional Responsibility Bureau to ensure a thorough review and evaluation is performed that will stand up to the scrutiny from the community,” he continued.“It is imperative that we look at this incident with a critical eye towards doing all that we can to understand what transpired and learning how, moving forward, we can improve from that evaluative process. “Webster said in order to clearly understand every aspect of the response, every law enforcement officer involved in the incident will be part of the Internal Affairs review.“Our Internal Affairs function will be limited in scope to this singular incident and the actions of those officers at the scene,” he said. “Any administrative actions based on our findings that may be imposed on anyone involved will be at the discretion of the individual police departments who employ these officers.”Seidle was described by those who knew him as a “great cop” and a “kind man.” He and his former wife divorced May 27. A judge denied a motion to reduce Seidle’s bail, which is currently set at $2 million with no 10 percent option.Tamara Seidle was the coordinator of religious education of the Mother of Mercy Parish and called a “pillar of faith” by the Bishop of the Diocese of Trenton, David M. O’Connell, C.M.Webster said, “in order for the law enforcement community to maintain the trust of our citizens, and earn the trust of those that may question the sincerity of our efforts, this review process must be transparent. To that end, I will be publicly releasing a report detailing our findings. “This will be a deliberate and all- encompassing review that will take time to complete, but rest assured this review will be conducted in as expedient manner possible for all involve,” he added.By Connor Whitelast_img read more

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Full-Day Kindergarten Before Fair Haven Voters

first_imgUpgrades are proposed for both the Viola L. Sickles and Knollwood schools. At Knollwood, a fourth through eighth-grade school, three classrooms would be added for “flexible classroom space,” which could be used for science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) programs. There would also be funding for middle school course pathways and small- group instruction, electrical upgrades, new boilers, masonry repairs and air conditioning in the gymnasium. There are currently five sections of kindergarten in Fair Haven. If the referendum is approved, full-day kindergarten could be implemented by fall 2020. Administrators estimate that the expansion will cost about $250,000 annually which can be absorbed into the operating budget, according to the district. At Sickles, a pre-K through third-grade school, there would be a secure entrance vestibule to improve safety; a multipurpose space for school use and recreational space; a world language classroom; upgraded electrical services; new boilers; masonry repairs; added parking areas on Willow Street; and a two-story addition with an elevator, allowing the district to implement full-day kindergarten. Lorie Gaines, a Fair Haven resident and a parent who advocated for full-day kindergarten years ago, said “it’s about time” the district gets the program. “I’d be very excited,” said the special education attorney. “I’m always looking to make sure we maximize our kids’ educational time.” “I felt it was my job tomake sure I exhausted anyother options I could beforeasking the community for areferendum,” said McNeil. Unfortunately, she said, the full-day expansion will not benefit her children because they have all passed kindergarten. FAIR HAVEN – Borough voters will be asked to weigh in on a $15.6 million bond referendum Tuesday, Sept. 24 that, if approved, will fund a full-day kindergarten program and other facility upgrades. The move to full-time kindergarten has been made by other schools in the Two River area. In Holmdel, Village Elementary School began this school year Sept. 4 with full-day kindergarten. According to the district, research showed children in full-day kindergarten had better academic outcomes and more self-confidence the following school year. The Fair Haven School District held two information sessions about the project last spring. McNeil said they were “fairly well attended” and feedback has been positive, adding that the work is “long overdue.” The next public information session will be held Monday, Sept. 16, at 7 p.m. at Sickles School. By Allison Perrine A secure entranceway is not planned for Knollwood in this referendum because new safety measures were recently completed over the summer at the school. A security vestibule is planned for the near future, according to the district, and will be funded by the operating budget, not through the referendum. The district estimates that based on the average valuation of a home in Fair Haven of $808,044, the average homeowner could be expected to pay an additional $429 per year in school taxes, or $35.75 per month, if the referendum is approved. It also said the 20-year bond would have a 3.4 percent interest rate. Gaines also said McNeil is “fantastic,” and has made “so many great improvements” since he joined the district. “If he can get this passed, kudos to him.” The district has not been able to implement full-day kindergarten for years, superintendent Sean McNeil said, adding that the conversation started before he came to the district four years ago. Current facilities do not have the space to offer it, he said, and historically the operating budget could not support it. Now, the district has the money to fund it but does not have the funds to build it. A one-time polling change will take place when voters head to the polls Tuesday, Sept. 24. The Church of the Nativity will not be used. Voting will be held from 2 to 8 p.m. that day at the Knollwood School only, at 224 Hance Road. School will end early that day. last_img read more