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Social Innovator: Joseph Feigelson

first_imgFounder: Kitchen GardenWhy is Joseph a Social Innovator?Know in horticultural circles as an “eco-trepreneur”, Joseph Feigelson brings the power of Mother Nature straight to the kitchen – literally.Using his indoor micro hydroponic food production system, called “Kitchen Garden”, you can grow low-cost, high-quality fresh food in the comfort of your own kitchen.Joseph is totally dedicated to the research and development of promoting good nutrition and the cost-effective usage of sprouts and herbs in every home.A great plus to this innovative product is that you don’t have to worry about the climate or weather. In a nutshell, it’s the ultimate self-sufficient garden for anyone desiring a reliable supply of pesticide-free, high-fibre, vitamin/mineral/enzyme-rich and energising fresh food.In his own words .“You know that as long as you’ve got sproutable seeds you’re only a few days away from enjoying adequate, pesticide-free nutrition.”Fast FactsPound for pound, a salad made from a variety of sprouts, compared with the traditional lettuce salad, costs less than half as much yet provides five times the amount of protein, six times as much vitamin C and seven times the amount of B-complex vitamins.Captain James Cook had his sailors eat sprouts, limes and lemons for their vitamin C content to aid in curing scurvy.The process of sprouting magnifies the nutritional value of the seed. It boosts the B-vitamin content, triples the amount of vitamin A and increases vitamin C by a factor of five to six times.Dr Paul Talalay, Abel Distinguished Service Professor of Pharmacology, says that three-day-old broccoli sprouts consistently contain 20 to 50 times the amount of chemo-protective compounds found in mature broccoli heads, and may offer a simple, dietary means of chemically reducing cancer risk.How can I help?To find out more, visit Kitchen Garden.Story published on SAinfo on 3 July 2008.Source: Brand South Africalast_img read more

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House Committee Tackles Refinery Waiver

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Siouxland Energy Cooperative in Iowa has experienced firsthand the recent ups and downs of the Renewable Fuel Standard.When the EPA granted 31 new small-refinery exemptions on August 9, it was the final straw for the corn-ethanol plant. Company officials were left with no choice but to shut down production.The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce on Tuesday examined the effects 85 small-refinery exemptions have had on biofuels and agriculture since 2016, during a hearing on the proposed Renewable Fuel Standard Integrity Act of 2019.The legislation would, among other things, require the EPA to make available more information on refinery exemptions.In recent weeks Siouxland Energy has returned to 50% production thanks to a change in the plant’s carbon emissions score from the California Air Resources Board. The change opened the California market to the Midwest producer.Primghar, Iowa, farmer Kelly Nieuwenhuis, president of Siouxland Energy, told the committee increased transparency on the exemptions process would help.“We’ve had farm subsidies and everyone sitting in this room can go online and see how much I’ve seen in farm subsidies,” Nieuwenhuis said. “I think small-refinery exemptions should be transparent.”Biofuels and agriculture interests say the more than 4 billion gallons in lost biofuels blending between 2016 and 2018, led to a fall in the volume of ethanol gallons blended in the United States for the first time in about 20 years.WAIVERS IN PUBLICCommittee Chairman Rep. Frank Pallone, D-New Jersey, said EPA decisions on exemptions should be made in the public eye because they are “far too consequential.“President Trump is pitting farmers and refiners against each other to the detriment of all stakeholders and consumers,” he said. “As a result, the RFS does not appear to be working the way it should for anyone involved.”Biofuels and agriculture groups point to the expansion of approved waivers as a reason for lost biofuels demand.During the hearing Chet Thompson, president and chief executive officer of the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, said data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the blend rate is at its highest level in history at 10.2% — effectively undermining claims of lost demand.“Contrary to the premise of today’s hearing and much of the narrative around this issue, however, small-refinery waivers have not had any demonstrable impact on domestic biofuels demand, which is at or near record highs,” Thompson said.“In fact, until recently, the administration’s RFS policy reduced compliance costs while enabling record biofuel use. EPA recently departed from this balance with a proposed reallocation that amounts to nothing more than an unjustified increase in the regulatory burden for non-exempt parties.”PLANTS SHUTTING DOWNRenewable Fuels Association President and Chief Executive Officer Geoff Cooper countered by pointing to the fact 19 ethanol plants have halted production as a result of small-refinery exemptions and historically low margins.The slowdown in production at those plants has affected about 700 direct jobs and about 2,800 indirect jobs, Cooper said.“In response to sustained weak or negative margins, ethanol plants have been forced to idle or shut down permanently,” he said.“Since the spring of 2018 — when the public began to recognize EPA’s massive expansion of the SRE program — at least 19 ethanol plants with combined production capacity of about 1.1 billion gallons have temporarily idled production or permanently closed. When an ethanol plant goes down, the local community suffers. The idling of an ethanol plant — even if temporary — sends damaging shockwaves throughout the entire community in which the facility operates, including lost jobs, the immediate loss of a local market for corn, and a sudden drop in local corn prices.”As president of Siouxland Energy, Nieuwenhuis said he was put in a tough spot when EPA announced the 31 exemptions in August.“Each year our plant produces up to 90 million gallons of clean, renewable biofuel,” he said.“And nearly all the corn I produce on my 2,100 acres is normally sold to this ethanol plant. Because of EPA’s actions to help pad the oil industry’s bottom line at the expense of farmers and biofuel producers, about six weeks ago, we had to make the hard decision to shut our local plant down and shut off a key local market for hundreds of farmers, including myself. Our plant has been operating for two decades — including throughout the great recession — without ever having to shut down operations.”On Oct. 15, the EPA announced a supplemental proposal to the 2020 renewable volume obligations rule, designed to account for small-refinery exemptions for 2020. The EPA proposed using average numbers from the U.S. Department of Energy on exempted gallons that come in far below actual waived gallons.Gene Gebolys, founder, president and chief executive officer of biodiesel producer World Energy, said his company has experienced the ill effects of small-refinery exemptions.“The impact on the industry is devastating,” he said.“World Energy, alone, has been forced to close three facilities, impacting more than 100 workers. EPA’s recent proposal to estimate small-refinery exemptions in 2020 will never make up for its past demand destruction. When EPA finalizes its 2020 renewable fuel obligations rule by the end of this year, it must fully account for small-refinery exemptions, or industry contraction and job losses will continue throughout the biofuels and broader agricultural economy.”The EPA is holding a public hearing in Ypsilanti, Michigan, on Wednesday on the agency’s latest supplemental proposal to the RFS.Todd Neeley can be reached at todd.neeley@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(CCSK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Cong. gearing up for 2 bypolls in Goa

first_imgThe Congress on Saturday said that next year Goa could be heading for mid-term polls along with the Lok Sabha elections.Former chief minister Digambar Kamat was addressing the press after a meeting of the Goa Congress Legislature Party and the Goa Pradesh Congress Committee. Mr. Kamat said that the party was in the process of starting its statewide drive to sign up members, seek donations, and create awareness of corruption and absence of governance in Goa. On the infighting between the coalition allies and the prolonged illness of Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar, who is battling advanced pancreatic cancer, Mr. Kamat said, “Nobody knows what will happen in the coming days. We are gearing up for the two by-elections, the Lok Sabha elections and the Assembly elections too.”Bypolls are expected to be held in two Assembly constituencies after two Congress MLAs quit the party to join the BJP two months ago. Mr. Kamat said, “People are angry with what is happening. We are trying to channelise their anger with the Jan Akrosh campaign and will visit all homes in the 40 Assembly constituencies to highlight the failures of the State government.”last_img read more

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₹24 lakh suspected poll cash seized in Bihar

first_imgThe police on Sunday seized ₹24 lakh in cash from two different places during a vehicle checking drive in Bihar’s Kishanganj district.Superintendent of Police Ashish Kumar said that the police seized ₹19.20 lakh and took two persons in custody from Lahra Chowk area while another ₹4.80 lakh was seized from Rampur check-post area in which one person was taken into custody. Both the seizures were made during a vehicle checking drive under Sadar police station of the town area, the SP said.The police are investigating the matter, he said and added that Income Tax officials have been informed about the seizures. The man in the first case was on his way to Siliguri via Kishanganj in his car bearing a West Bengal registration number, the SP said. The other person was also on his way to Siliguri from West Bengal’s Malda district. Sources, however, said that the money was being transported for use in the general elections which begin on April 11.last_img read more

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Uttarakhand BJP expels four workers

first_imgUttarakhand BJP on Tuesday expelled four workers and office-bearers for working against party-supported nominees in the ongoing panchayat polls in the State. Party’s State unit general secretary Rajendra Bhandari issued the letter expelling four more party functionaries on the direction of the State BJP president.Total 94 Dehradun district BJP Mahila Morcha president Maya Pant was among those expelled on Tuesday. This takes the total number of party workers expelled by the BJP for anti-party activities so far to 94, State BJP media in-charge Devendra Bhasin said. State BJP president and Nainital MP Mr. Bhatt had said discipline is the party’s topmost priority and those who breach it will be dealt with sternly. The party has served a notice to its Raipur MLA Umesh Sharma Kau and sought an explanation within three days. Mr. Kau was served a notice on October 6 after an audio clip went viral in which he was heard purportedly asking for votes for an Independent candidate.last_img read more