0

Golden Cleats Awards tonight

first_imgTrack and field megastars Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce are the favourites to emerge the top athletes at tonight’s JAAA/Scotiabank Golden Cleats Awards at the Chinese Benevolent Association auditorium on Old Hope Road.Bolt won the men’s sprint double at this year’s IAAF World Championships in Beijing in addition to leading the men to sprint relay gold.Fraser-Pryce won the women’s 100m in Beijing, and was also a member of the women’s sprint relay team which took gold in a championship record 41.07 seconds.The awards ceremony is set to begin at 6:30 p.m.last_img read more

0

QPR v Burton line-ups: Holloway makes changes, Fulham man starts for Burton

first_imgQPR boss Ian Holloway has made two changes to his side for the game at Loftus Road.On-loan winger Kazenga LuaLua makes his first start and there is also a place in the team for Michael Doughty. Ryan Manning and Jamie Mackie are on the bench.Lasse Vigen Christensen starts for Burton and Cauley Woodrow is among their substitutes. Both players were signed on loan from Fulham this week.QPR: Smithies, Furlong, Onuoha, Lynch, Bidwell, Wszolek, Doughty, Hall, Luongo, LuaLua, Sylla, Subs: Ingram, Mackie, Washington, Perch, Shodipo, Eze, Manning.Burton: McLaughlin, Flanagan, Brayford, Turner, Sordell, Dyer, McCrory, Palmer. Christensen, Murphy, Irvine. Subs: Bywater, Mousinho, Williamson, Atkins, Woodrow, Miller, Barker.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

0

House Committee Tackles Refinery Waiver

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Siouxland Energy Cooperative in Iowa has experienced firsthand the recent ups and downs of the Renewable Fuel Standard.When the EPA granted 31 new small-refinery exemptions on August 9, it was the final straw for the corn-ethanol plant. Company officials were left with no choice but to shut down production.The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce on Tuesday examined the effects 85 small-refinery exemptions have had on biofuels and agriculture since 2016, during a hearing on the proposed Renewable Fuel Standard Integrity Act of 2019.The legislation would, among other things, require the EPA to make available more information on refinery exemptions.In recent weeks Siouxland Energy has returned to 50% production thanks to a change in the plant’s carbon emissions score from the California Air Resources Board. The change opened the California market to the Midwest producer.Primghar, Iowa, farmer Kelly Nieuwenhuis, president of Siouxland Energy, told the committee increased transparency on the exemptions process would help.“We’ve had farm subsidies and everyone sitting in this room can go online and see how much I’ve seen in farm subsidies,” Nieuwenhuis said. “I think small-refinery exemptions should be transparent.”Biofuels and agriculture interests say the more than 4 billion gallons in lost biofuels blending between 2016 and 2018, led to a fall in the volume of ethanol gallons blended in the United States for the first time in about 20 years.WAIVERS IN PUBLICCommittee Chairman Rep. Frank Pallone, D-New Jersey, said EPA decisions on exemptions should be made in the public eye because they are “far too consequential.“President Trump is pitting farmers and refiners against each other to the detriment of all stakeholders and consumers,” he said. “As a result, the RFS does not appear to be working the way it should for anyone involved.”Biofuels and agriculture groups point to the expansion of approved waivers as a reason for lost biofuels demand.During the hearing Chet Thompson, president and chief executive officer of the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, said data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the blend rate is at its highest level in history at 10.2% — effectively undermining claims of lost demand.“Contrary to the premise of today’s hearing and much of the narrative around this issue, however, small-refinery waivers have not had any demonstrable impact on domestic biofuels demand, which is at or near record highs,” Thompson said.“In fact, until recently, the administration’s RFS policy reduced compliance costs while enabling record biofuel use. EPA recently departed from this balance with a proposed reallocation that amounts to nothing more than an unjustified increase in the regulatory burden for non-exempt parties.”PLANTS SHUTTING DOWNRenewable Fuels Association President and Chief Executive Officer Geoff Cooper countered by pointing to the fact 19 ethanol plants have halted production as a result of small-refinery exemptions and historically low margins.The slowdown in production at those plants has affected about 700 direct jobs and about 2,800 indirect jobs, Cooper said.“In response to sustained weak or negative margins, ethanol plants have been forced to idle or shut down permanently,” he said.“Since the spring of 2018 — when the public began to recognize EPA’s massive expansion of the SRE program — at least 19 ethanol plants with combined production capacity of about 1.1 billion gallons have temporarily idled production or permanently closed. When an ethanol plant goes down, the local community suffers. The idling of an ethanol plant — even if temporary — sends damaging shockwaves throughout the entire community in which the facility operates, including lost jobs, the immediate loss of a local market for corn, and a sudden drop in local corn prices.”As president of Siouxland Energy, Nieuwenhuis said he was put in a tough spot when EPA announced the 31 exemptions in August.“Each year our plant produces up to 90 million gallons of clean, renewable biofuel,” he said.“And nearly all the corn I produce on my 2,100 acres is normally sold to this ethanol plant. Because of EPA’s actions to help pad the oil industry’s bottom line at the expense of farmers and biofuel producers, about six weeks ago, we had to make the hard decision to shut our local plant down and shut off a key local market for hundreds of farmers, including myself. Our plant has been operating for two decades — including throughout the great recession — without ever having to shut down operations.”On Oct. 15, the EPA announced a supplemental proposal to the 2020 renewable volume obligations rule, designed to account for small-refinery exemptions for 2020. The EPA proposed using average numbers from the U.S. Department of Energy on exempted gallons that come in far below actual waived gallons.Gene Gebolys, founder, president and chief executive officer of biodiesel producer World Energy, said his company has experienced the ill effects of small-refinery exemptions.“The impact on the industry is devastating,” he said.“World Energy, alone, has been forced to close three facilities, impacting more than 100 workers. EPA’s recent proposal to estimate small-refinery exemptions in 2020 will never make up for its past demand destruction. When EPA finalizes its 2020 renewable fuel obligations rule by the end of this year, it must fully account for small-refinery exemptions, or industry contraction and job losses will continue throughout the biofuels and broader agricultural economy.”The EPA is holding a public hearing in Ypsilanti, Michigan, on Wednesday on the agency’s latest supplemental proposal to the RFS.Todd Neeley can be reached at todd.neeley@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(CCSK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

0

Geocaching Reveals Lost Ancestors

first_img SharePrint RelatedHow to throw an awesome New Year’s geocaching bash in 5 easy stepsNovember 10, 2015In “Community”The Seanachai: Keeper of the Old Lore, Reviewer of the New CachesMay 6, 2015In “Community”Out with the old, in with these two new souvenirs!November 8, 2018In “Geocaching.com Souvenirs” Danny and Laura “Cachn’Zoom”A race to find a newly published geocache uncovers a century-old piece of family history. Laura and Danny geocache under the name Cachn’Zoom. The experience helped the husband and wife team from North Carolina connect family ties back to earliest days of the United States of America.Laura and Danny know geocaching introduces them to new sights, experiences and friends.Laura says, “I have met some wonderful new adventurous friends since I started caching. I’ve been rappelling, rock climbing, hiked for miles and miles, gone on ‘geo-road trips’, and seen more waterfalls in the past year than I have in the past ten years!”But nothing could prepared them for a recent cache run on a newly published historical series of geocaches. Laura says it all started with a competitive flair. Laura writes, “I am notified when new caches are published. I don’t always make a mad dash for the FTF (First to Find), however on this day Danny and I were able to head out to try and beat a few of the ‘FTF hounds’ in our area. Gotta keep them on their toes!”She says they had already claimed a couple FTF’s when they arrived at a cache in the series called, “Adam Cooper – Long Ago But not Far Away – Fairview.” The team wouldn’t claim an FTF on that geocache.According to Laura, “Upon our arrival, we noticed our good buddy RobinMohawk already there.  He had just signed the log and re-hid the cache and enjoyed watching us finish the search. Just as I was replacing the cache, I heard ‘Mr Cachn’Zoom’ say ‘I don’t believe it.’”Danny by headstone of his ancestorThe geocache is hidden with permission near the burial site of a pioneer settler, Adam Cooper. Danny was exploring other tombstones when Laura says, “Danny proceeded to inform us that he had found the grave of a distant ancestor, John Lanning – a pioneer.” Lanning had died more than 170 years ago. Danny also found the marker for Lanning’s wife,  Sarah Whitaker.Laura says, “When we returned home he verified the discovery with the genealogy report of his family.  John Lanning is my husbands ‘great, great, great, great, great grandfather’ and Sarah Whitaker is his ‘great, great, great, great, great grandmother’, on his mother’s side of the family.”Ruth, Dare2Geocache, placed that geocache. She says she discovered some local heritage as well, “I had a blast researching our local history to create both the Fairview and the Spring Mountain historical series.  We have so many “local treasures,” as I’m sure most communities do.  [They are] places that people pass by daily and never know exist, or they never know the details that make these places so interesting.”The story of Danny and Laura’s family discovery spread fast. She says, “Most folks are amazed and are surprised to learn we located this while ‘geocaching’.  We would have never located this without geocaching.”The couple just returned from vacation and are already playing catchup with local geocaches. Laura says, “Thanks to all the geocachers who keep this adventure going and growing!  There were at least ten new caches published in my area while I was away for a week!”Laura and Danny do not expect the discoveries to stop any time soon. She says they’re looking forward to, “hours and hours of more fun and adventure!”Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

0

17 days agoEverton hero Howard part-owner in Dagenham & Redbridge FC

first_imgEverton hero Howard part-owner in Dagenham & Redbridge FCby Paul Vegas17 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Everton and Manchester United goalkeeper Tim Howard is part-owner of Dagenham & Redbridge FC.Howard, 40, who made 414 appearances for the Blues across a decade-long stint between 2006-16 – more than any other player from outside the British Isles – played the final game of his professional career on Sunday in Colorado Rapids’ 3-1 defeat to Los Angeles.With his playing days now over, Howard looks poised to be casting his eyes back across the Atlantic on a more regular basis to National League club Dagenham & Redbridge where he has been part of their US-based Trinity Sports Holdings ownership team for the past year, says the Liverpool Echo.The club, who were only formed in 1992 after a merger between Dagenham FC and Redbridge Forest, spent nine years in the Football League between 2007-16 but are currently in the National League and finished 18 out of the 24 clubs in the division last season. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

0

2 days agoAxel Tuanzebe back to boost Man Utd

first_imgAxel Tuanzebe back to boost Man Utdby Paul Vegas2 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United defender Axel Tuanzebe is set to return at the weekend after a hip injury forced him out of the draw with Liverpool.The centre-back, 21, picked up the problem in the warm-up on Sunday and was replaced by Marcos Rojo.The Sun says Ole Gunnar Solskjaer wants to rest the youngster for Thursday’s Europa League clash against Partizan Belgrade but he is expected for the trip to Norwich.Tuanzebe will be in contention for a place in the squad for the Carrow Road clash when Solskjaer looks to build on the draw against the Champions League holders.He had started the previous two Premier League matches against Arsenal and Newcastle, after getting told he is part of the first-team plans at United when loan offers came in this summer. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

0

Ohio State LB Darron Lee Doesn’t Understand Why Michigan Brags About Its Success In The 90s

first_imgDarron Lee tweets message bashing the Michigan 1990's teams.Darron Lee Michigan DissIt’s been a while since Michigan’s football program was truly elite. Since the 1990s, probably. Two decades ago, the Wolverines won a national championship (1997), five Big Ten championships and had a winning record (7-2) against rival Ohio State. Since then, they’ve had a couple really good seasons, but success on a national level (and against the Buckeyes) has been inconsistent at best. Ohio State sophomore linebacker Darron Lee doesn’t understand why the Wolverines think they can brag about what happened 20-something years ago. Never knew why the TTUN always talked about the 90’s like anyone remembers…or cared but hey gotta cling to something right?— Darron Lee (@DLeeMG8) May 19, 2015Michigan’s game against Ohio State – the first Jim Harbaugh vs. Urban Meyer meeting – is set to occur on Nov. 28. We can’t wait for it.last_img read more

0

Inmate who spent four years in solitary subject to abhorrent treatment judge

first_imgA mentally ill Indigenous man kept in isolation in an Ontario jail for more than four years endured treatment so “abhorrent and “inhumane” it affected his ability to stand trial for murder, a judge ruled while staying the charge.Superior Court Justice John Fregeau ruled that Adam Capay, whose case sparked a public debate on solitary confinement in correctional facilities, endured permanent memory loss and had his pre-existing psychiatric disorders greatly exacerbated after spending four and a half years in segregation, often without proper sleep or access to mental health services.Fregeau’s late January decision, which resulted in Capay’s release, was subject to a publication ban that only lifted once prosecutors indicated this week they did not plan to appeal the stay of the first-degree murder charge in the case.Capay, 26, was accused of stabbing Sherman Quisses twice in the neck while both were at a correctional facility in Thunder Bay, Ont. While the judge acknowledged that Capay was responsible for Quisses’ death, he said the man’s subsequent years of isolation amounted to cruel and unusual punishment that violated his charter rights and left him unable to proceed to trial.“The treatment of the accused was, in my opinion, outrageous, abhorrent, and inhumane,” Fregeau wrote in his Jan. 28 decision. “There would be ongoing prejudice to the accused if forced to proceed to trial.”Fregeau’s ruling outlined a litany of difficult circumstances Capay faced beginning during his turbulent childhood on the Lac Seul First Nation in northwestern Ontario.Capay grew up in a family dominated by substance abuse and violence, the judge said. Capay was repeatedly sexually abused as a child, exposed to alcohol at age seven and had inhaled solvents by age eight, Fregeau wrote. Capay’s father once tried to force his son to kill him when he was 10, the judge added.Fregeau’s ruling said Capay was placed in segregation at the Thunder Bay Correctional Centre immediately after his 2012 attack on Quisses.Between June 4, 2012 and Dec. 6, 2016, Capay was largely kept in isolation for 23 hours a day.For much of that time, Capay languished in cells where the lights were kept on 24 hours a day. For long stretches, the detention blocks he was held in did not allow him to flush the toilet from inside the cell.Over his four and a half years in segregation, Fregeau found Capay received less than 11 hours of mental health support from jail staff.Capay’s long-standing isolation was known to correctional officials, who repeatedly signed off on extending his time in segregation even as the total number of days climbed up over the 1,600 mark.Fregeau noted Capay’s plight only came to light in 2016 after a guard tipped off Ontario’s human rights commissioner while she was visiting the facility.Calling the segregation review process “meaningless” in Capay’s case, Fregeau cited the testimony of an expert witness who described the system in dehumanizing terms.“People are filling out forms. They’re checking boxes, but it’s as if Adam Capay’s disappeared,” Michael Jackson, a British Columbia-based professor with expertise on the Indigenous people within the justice system, told court.Fregeau accepted testimony from other experts who said Capay suffered permanent memory loss and considerable deterioration in his mental state as a result of his long time in isolation.Crown lawyers had conceded his treatment while incarcerated amounted to cruel and unusual punishment, but said there were steps the court could take to ensure Capay still stood a fair trial. Defence lawyers contended the impacts of his segregation compromised his ability to stand trial or mount a credible defence.Capay’s lawyers said the decision to stay the first-degree murder charge is an indictment of the treatment their client endured.“A stay of proceedings was the only appropriate remedy,” Karen Symes and Adriel Weaver said. “The Crown’s decision not to appeal affirms that conclusion.”The lawyers acknowledged, however, that the decision is “a painful one” for Quisses’ family and community, saying they too suffered “profound harm” due to the actions of corrections officials.Capay’s case prompted the provincial Liberal government of the day to order a review of the use of segregation in jails. It also announced a 15-consecutive-day limit on inmates being held in disciplinary segregation, down from 30.The review, released in 2017, called for an end to indefinite segregation of inmates in the province’s jails, but stopped short of urging an outright ban on the practice.The province’s ombudsman has also urged the government to end indefinite segregation and said no inmate should be kept in isolation for more than 60 days in a year.Correctional Services Minister Sylvia Jones said the Progressive Conservative government respected Fregeau’s decision. Her thoughts were with the Quisses family, she said, noting the government has taken steps to manage inmates more effectively.“We must prevent a similar case from happening again,” she said.Michelle McQuigge, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

0

White House gets pressure from within US to spare Canada from steel

first_imgWASHINGTON – The Trump administration is coming under political pressure at home to exclude Canada from global tariffs on steel and aluminum, and while stating its preference for holding firm it’s leaving the door open just the tiniest crack to the possibility of adjustments.Lawmakers, businesses, and hosts on the Sunday political talk-shows all challenged the logic of slapping a national-security tariff on a peaceful next-door neighbour, pushing the administration to justify its move.The administration says a final announcement is coming next week. On Sunday, it signalled that President Donald Trump is leaning toward a no-exceptions-for-anyone attitude — but then added some potential asterisks.In the midst of an internal tug-of-war within the White House the administration was represented on the talk shows by two of its most prominent trade hawks, Trump advisor Peter Navarro and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.Both appeared to suggest the decision is close to final.While no countries will be excluded, Navarro said some industries could get exemptions. This is of keen interest to Canada’s auto sector, which is a leading supplier of steel and aluminum to the U.S.: “There’ll be an exemption procedure for particular cases where we need to have exemptions so business can move forward,” Navarro said on CNN.Ross held out the slim prospect of some changes: “We shall see,” he told NBC’s “Meet The Press.”“(Trump) has made a decision at this point,” he said of the 25 per cent tariff for steel and 10 per cent tariff for aluminum. “If he for some reason should change his mind, then it’ll change. I have no reason to believe he’s going to change his mind.”The administration is being deluged with demands from its own political allies to relax its policy. The same two top Republican lawmakers who shepherded Trump’s tax-cut achievement through Congress, Kevin Brady and Orrin Hatch, have pleaded for revisions.A senator of a border state said he’s already hearing from businesses at home. Angus King, an Independent senator from Maine, compared Trump’s plan to the devastating U.S. tariffs of the 1930s. He said companies in his state fear price increases for steel.King said any trade actions should be targeted to discourage Chinese dumping — not hit the entire world.“You want to do these kinds of things with a scalpel — not a chainsaw,” King told NBC.To apply the tariffs, the U.S. is invoking a rarely used clause in a 1962 trade law that allows the president to declare tariffs if required by national security. The White House argues that the wording is broad, and that national security also could include employment and economic stability of the domestic steel industry.“I don’t think we need to block Canadian steel in the name of national security. They’re annoying. You know, they’re too nice. But we don’t fear a war with Canada,” King said.Every host of the big weekly U.S. talk shows raised the Canada angle.Fox News’s Chris Wallace asked how the White House can possibly justify using a national security excuse for imposing tariffs on a close NATO partner, and legal member of the U.S. military-industrial complex.CNN’s Jake Tapper asked Navarro to imagine how Canada might see this: “From the perspective of Canada … Canada would say, ‘National security exemption? We fight with you in every war. Our soldiers are right next to your soldiers in every conflict. What possible scenario could you envision where we wouldn’t supply you with steel and aluminum?’”But the general response from Trump officials was that everyone should prepare for tariffs. When Navarro was asked on Fox whether Trump would exclude anyone, he responded in the negative.“That’s not his decision,” Navarro replied.“As soon as he starts exempting countries he has to raise tariffs on everybody else. As soon as he exempts one country his phone starts ringing from the heads of state of other countries.”He added more details in an interview with CNN: “Canada’s 40 per cent of the (American aluminum) market. If you exempt Canada, then you have to put big, big tariffs on everybody else. So this is a measured, targeted approach.”He was repeatedly pressed on the Canada issue in these interviews. Navarro did leave out the possibility of certain industries being exempted.The issue has sparked a ferocious debate within the White House. Last week, it appeared Trump had frozen out the free-traders in his office and made this announcement with the support of hawks like Navarro.American press reports have also described the president feeling angry and isolated in recent days. His administration has been hit with resignations, infighting and conflict-of-interest allegations involving the president’s own son-in-law, Jared Kushner.A South Carolina Republican called it folly.Sen. Lindsey Graham mentioned the Volkswagen and BMW plants in his state and expressed fear of how a trade war might affect jobs there. He said there’s reason to pursue China for intellectual-property theft and product dumping, but this is hitting all the wrong targets.He addressed Trump directly in his interview on CBS’s ”Face The Nation.””You’re letting China off the hook,” Graham said.”You’re punishing the American consumer and our allies. You’re making a huge mistake here. Go after China — not the rest of the world.”last_img read more

0

Visions Voices with Medium Tania Thomas

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Medium Tania Thomas will be bringing her live show, Visions & Voices to the Lido theatre, Thursday, April 4th.Thomas is an internationally known Spiritual Medium and Intuitive Life Coach. Thomas believes that each person should leave her session or live event feeling better than they did when they first walked in.Visions & Voices event will feature selected readings by Thomas alongside the music of the Sarah Smith Musical Duo. This evening is said to be uplifting, inspiring and comforting. Doors open at 6:00 pm and the show ends at 9:30 pm “Events such as these very often create a deeper sense of community. People are involved in the very personal aspects of private stories and the empathy is incredible,” said Thomas “Friendships are made, supports are discovered and people learn that it’s ok to cry, it’s ok to be honest in grief and to allow others the opportunity to offer support.”Thomas shares she is a natural born medium, with a “give it as I get it” motto allowing the words that your loved ones wish to say to come forward unfiltered and true. Thomas’s intention is to change the way that you view life following physical death.  To bring some comfort, reminders of small joys and direction to your life as you move through the grief.For a link to the FB Event Page; CLICK HERElast_img read more

1 2 3