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Australian solar facility gets Tesla battery retrofit

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Clean Technica:A 25 MW/50 MWh Tesla grid-scale battery was commissioned this week at the 60 MW Gannawarra solar power plant north of Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria.This makes the Gannawarra facility the largest in the country to be retrofitted with a storage battery. Last month, installation of a 30 MW/30 MWh battery at the Ballarat power station in Victoria was completed. That battery is expected to begin operations before next summer.The battery is owned by Australia’s renewables developer Edify Energy and Germany’s Wirsol and operated by EnergyAustralia under a long-term power purchase agreement, according to PV Magazine. Both batteries were paid for by a $50 million grant from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and the government of Victoria, with each contributing $25 million.Although it was completed ahead of schedule, Edify Energy and Wirsol say that they had to overcome some unique regulatory and technical challenges to deliver the first battery storage system retrofitted to an existing solar farm. While the Australian government dithers and diddles about moving away from coal and toward renewables, the Australian states are filling the policy void and creating new commercial models for renewable energy and storage facilities in Australia.Asking people to change their behavior for a good social purpose seldom gets very far. Asking people to change their behavior to save money works a whole lot better. That’s what’s happening in Victoria today as well as in South Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, the Northern Territories, and Western Australia. The toothless, muddle-headed national government has made itself irrelevant to energy policy in Australia, proving once again that money is more important than ideology every time.More: 50 MWh Tesla battery commissioned at Australian solar power plant Australian solar facility gets Tesla battery retrofitlast_img read more

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Minimus vs. Maximus

first_imgMinimus vs. Maximus It seems as if a line in the sand of the running world has been drawn: minimalists who want a barefoot feel from their running shoes, and traditionalists who still crave more cushion for the pushin’. We take a look at two new minimal running shoes and two new hyper-cushioned shoes.Minimal1. New Balance – Minimus Trail It’s more of a transitional barefoot shoe than the Vibram Five Fingers. The Minimus looks like a trail racer and has a 4mm drop from the heel to toe, as opposed to the coveted “zero drop” of most other barefoot shoes. But the Minimus Trail has no insert and a minimal midsole and outsole for a supremely flexible package. 7 ounces. $100; newbalance.com 2. Inov-8 – Bare-Grip 200 Long before Born to Run became a bestseller, Inov-8 was focused on simple, lightweight trail shoes. Their latest innovation, the Bare Grip 200, highlights the qualities that Inov-8 has always done best: low-profile simplicity and super-grippy traction. The Bare Grips have zero drop from heel to toe, and the knobby cleats grip the ground better than any trail shoe on the market. 7 ounces. $110; Inov-8.comCushioned3. Montrail – Fairhaven This hyper-cushioned shoe has Montrail’s new FluidPost midsole that adjusts to the amount of pronation “on demand.” When you’re running on flat surfaces like roads, your foot strikes the softer center of the midsole. As you move to uneven trails, your foot occasionally strikes the edges of the midsole, where the foam is denser and offers more support. 11 ounces. $110; montrail.com 1 2last_img read more