0

Elections for City Mayor, Deputy slated for March 15

first_img…Chase Green expected to seek re-electionPursuant to the Municipal and Districts Councils Act Chapter 28:01, Section 10, elections for Mayor and Deputy Mayor of the City of Georgetown will be held on March 15. Current Mayor Patricia Chase Green, refused to comment on whether she would be seeking re-election while Deputy Mayor Lionel Jaikaran, has expressed his interest in possible re-election.“The term of the Office of the Mayor and that of the Deputy Mayor shall, subject to this Act, be one year, commencing on the first day of the month following upon their election but, the Mayor and Deputy Mayor shall, notwithstanding the expiry of his term of office, continue to hold office until his successor enters upon office and thereupon he shall retire,” the Municipal and Districts Councils Act Chapter 28:01, Section 10 states.The last election for Mayor and Deputy Mayor were held in December 2016, which Chase Green contested without any opposition. However, since her election, there have been several calls for her to resign and be replaced for the policies that were implemented along with the perceived notion of corruption.Chase Green, who served as Deputy Mayor for a number of years under former Mayor Hamilton Green, is accused of being unsympathetic to the cause of the Council’s workers since she and teams of officers and Councillors would travel frequently while the workers protest for the payment of their salaries.Additionally, it was under Chase Green’s stewardship that the highly flawed and controversial parking metre project came into being. The M&CC had entered into a contract with Smart City Solutions Inc on May 13, 2016, for parking metres to be implemented in Georgetown but this was followed by intense protests by citizens.Meanwhile, Jaikaran did not confirm nor deny whether he would challenge Chase Green for the mayoral chair but indicated that he would be running for office. (Lakhram Bhagirat)last_img read more

0

Image stitching technique lets scientists explore shipwrecks from dry land

first_imgDiparttimento di Studi Umanistici Universita Ca Foscari Venezia By Michael PriceOct. 20, 2017 , 11:30 AM Image ‘stitching’ technique lets scientists explore shipwrecks from dry land center_img Shipwrecks and other underwater relics can tell archaeologists a lot about ancient people’s seafaring ways, but investigating these sites can be costly, time-consuming, and dangerous. Now, an inexpensive imaging method is allowing underwater archaeologists to ditch their wetsuits and explore complex, 3D renderings of the briny deep from the safety of dry land. Called multi-image photogrammetry, the process uses underwater cameras and sophisticated computer software to stitch together images and develop extremely accurate virtual dive sites. In a single dive day, the renderings can capture topographic details that would take weeks of manual measurements to record (above). Archaeologists studying ancient shipwrecks recently put this technique through the paces at three different shipwreck sites dated to the second and third centuries C.E. off the coast of Sicily in Italy. The wreck sites are littered with large marble columns and blocks and piles of amphorae—ceramic vats used by ancient people throughout the Roman Republic. By excavating and rephotographing the amphorae layer by layer, the archaeologists preserved a record of the shipwreck’s contents in their original sunken configuration, they report this month in the Journal of Cultural Heritage. And it’s not a purely archival effort: Analyzing 3D renderings of the Marzamemi I, a third century Roman shipwreck site off the coast of Pachino, Sicily, let the researchers accurately gauge the volume of the ship’s cargo of scattered marble blocks and columns. That, in turn, allowed them to estimate the size of the vessel—a freighter between 32 and 40 meters long—offering some of the first evidence of the type of transport ships used in this era.last_img read more