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LEICESTER VS CHELSEA

first_imgLEICESTER (4-4-2)SCHMEICHEL,SIMPSON, MORGAN, HUTH, FUCHS,MAHREZ, DRINKWATER, KANTE, ALBRIGHTON,ULLOA, VARDYCHELSEA (4-2-3-1)COSTA,PEDRO, OSCAR, WILLIAN,MATIC, FABREGAS,BABA, TERRY, CAHILL, IVANOVIC,COURTOISChelsea, after such a poor league season, confirmed their place in the knockout stages of the Champions League with a 2-0 win over Portuguese club Porto on Wednesday. It should give them a boost ahead of a difficult game on Monday.Remarkably, Leicester City face reigning champions Chelsea at the top of the table. The Foxes have 32 points – 17 more than the Blues, who are languishing in 14th place and just two points clear of the relegation zone.And at this stage of last season Chelsea were top – and Leicester were bottom. After 15 games of the 2014-15 campaign the Blues had 36 points, 21 more than they have now. By contrast, Leicester had 10 points, 22 fewer than they have now.Leicester are finding the net with ease; they have now scored three goals in each of their last three away games.Their latest success came at Swansea City last weekend when, for once, Jamie Vardy failed to score. He remains the Premier League’s leading scorer, with 14. But teammate Riyad Mahrez took over the limelight with a hat-trick in Wales.That was the ninth hat-trick of the season, just one short of last season’s total over the season.last_img read more

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Richards Bay IDZ opens for business

first_img9 September 2011 Creating opportunities, developing skills The 216-hectare industrial estate was promulgated in 2002 as a public entity, with 60% of its shares held by the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Economic Development and Tourism and 40% by the City of uMhlatuze, the municipality that incorporates Richards Bay and Empangeni. “We are strategically placed – about 500km from the financial capital of the country, located adjacent to a natural deep sea water port, and operating in a region full of global players,” Richards Bay IDZ chief executive Ike Nxedlana said at a sod-turning ceremony this week. When considering incentives that involve customs control areas, Mabuyakhulu said it was important to consider the costs of administration as well as the need to discourage rent-seeking or mobility of investors when a better short-term incentive was available elsewhere. According to Mabuyakhulu, the development of a national policy on special economic development zones will allow for additional incentives to further entice investors to these zones, with most countries with similar zones offering a range of tax exemptions and reduced or waived customs duties. “This is particularly the case for SMMEs that are involved in the construction industry as well as those that will benefit through up-streaming, down-streaming and beneficiation initiatives,” he said. “It is also important that some creative incentives are packaged around the creation of jobs in relation to the objectives of the New Growth Path,” he said. “Incentives should be packaged in such a way that industries that have a high labour absorption rate are attracted to the zone.” To date, the only investor operating within the zone is Tata Steel, which has an investment of R960-million, and employs 184 permanent staff and 85 full-time contract employees. According to KwaZulu-Natal MEC for Economic Development and Tourism Mike Mabuyakhulu, the main purpose of attracting foreign investment to IDZs are to encourage value-addition activities and the export of beneficiated products from South Africa, and in the process also to transfer skills and technology to local companies. The Richards Bay Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) on South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal coast has finally commenced its Phase 1A development in preparation for forthcoming investors. He suggested that the IDZ policy could refer to sector specific incentives based sectors promoted through Industrial policy. The Richards Bay IDZ will also undertake a study and prepare analytical reports to identify niche foreign markets and suggest methods to intensify local participation in the IDZ programme.center_img Nxedlana added that many other potential investors had shown an interest in the zone, naming pulp and paper producer Pulp United as one of them. Developing a national policy The availability of feedstock such as aluminium, heavy metals, various chemicals, wood, pulp, paper, agricultural products, gas, coal and electricity also offer numerous downstream manufacturing possibilities for investors. According to Nxedlana, the rapid development of phase 1A is likely to enhance the role played by small and medium-sized enterprises. He added that by October this year, they would announce the identity of a company that would invest about R1-billion to establish a fertiliser exporting company within the Richards Bay IDZ, creating about 1 000 indirect jobs during the construction phase and 150 permanent jobs thereafter. He added that tax incentives are easier to provide than changes to the national tax regime, and can be a means for governments to signal their commitment to investment. Nxedlana said that they were also on the verge of establishing the first customs controlled area within an industrial development zone in South Africa, at Tata Steel’s facilities. It will also be the first area to test the customs control area policy recently approved by the South African Revenue Service. “When investigating Intel’s decision to invest in Costa Rica, the expression of the Costa Rican government’s support and commitment through the provision of a tax incentive was of huge importance to their decision to invest … even though Costa Rica did not offer the highest incentives compared to other nations competing for investments,” he explained. “The key reason for developing zones is for developing industrial capability through utilising and learning from new technologies from the foreign firms rather than just solely generating foreign direct investment,” he said. Investors already showing interest SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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House Committee Tackles Refinery Waiver

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Siouxland Energy Cooperative in Iowa has experienced firsthand the recent ups and downs of the Renewable Fuel Standard.When the EPA granted 31 new small-refinery exemptions on August 9, it was the final straw for the corn-ethanol plant. Company officials were left with no choice but to shut down production.The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce on Tuesday examined the effects 85 small-refinery exemptions have had on biofuels and agriculture since 2016, during a hearing on the proposed Renewable Fuel Standard Integrity Act of 2019.The legislation would, among other things, require the EPA to make available more information on refinery exemptions.In recent weeks Siouxland Energy has returned to 50% production thanks to a change in the plant’s carbon emissions score from the California Air Resources Board. The change opened the California market to the Midwest producer.Primghar, Iowa, farmer Kelly Nieuwenhuis, president of Siouxland Energy, told the committee increased transparency on the exemptions process would help.“We’ve had farm subsidies and everyone sitting in this room can go online and see how much I’ve seen in farm subsidies,” Nieuwenhuis said. “I think small-refinery exemptions should be transparent.”Biofuels and agriculture interests say the more than 4 billion gallons in lost biofuels blending between 2016 and 2018, led to a fall in the volume of ethanol gallons blended in the United States for the first time in about 20 years.WAIVERS IN PUBLICCommittee Chairman Rep. Frank Pallone, D-New Jersey, said EPA decisions on exemptions should be made in the public eye because they are “far too consequential.“President Trump is pitting farmers and refiners against each other to the detriment of all stakeholders and consumers,” he said. “As a result, the RFS does not appear to be working the way it should for anyone involved.”Biofuels and agriculture groups point to the expansion of approved waivers as a reason for lost biofuels demand.During the hearing Chet Thompson, president and chief executive officer of the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, said data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the blend rate is at its highest level in history at 10.2% — effectively undermining claims of lost demand.“Contrary to the premise of today’s hearing and much of the narrative around this issue, however, small-refinery waivers have not had any demonstrable impact on domestic biofuels demand, which is at or near record highs,” Thompson said.“In fact, until recently, the administration’s RFS policy reduced compliance costs while enabling record biofuel use. EPA recently departed from this balance with a proposed reallocation that amounts to nothing more than an unjustified increase in the regulatory burden for non-exempt parties.”PLANTS SHUTTING DOWNRenewable Fuels Association President and Chief Executive Officer Geoff Cooper countered by pointing to the fact 19 ethanol plants have halted production as a result of small-refinery exemptions and historically low margins.The slowdown in production at those plants has affected about 700 direct jobs and about 2,800 indirect jobs, Cooper said.“In response to sustained weak or negative margins, ethanol plants have been forced to idle or shut down permanently,” he said.“Since the spring of 2018 — when the public began to recognize EPA’s massive expansion of the SRE program — at least 19 ethanol plants with combined production capacity of about 1.1 billion gallons have temporarily idled production or permanently closed. When an ethanol plant goes down, the local community suffers. The idling of an ethanol plant — even if temporary — sends damaging shockwaves throughout the entire community in which the facility operates, including lost jobs, the immediate loss of a local market for corn, and a sudden drop in local corn prices.”As president of Siouxland Energy, Nieuwenhuis said he was put in a tough spot when EPA announced the 31 exemptions in August.“Each year our plant produces up to 90 million gallons of clean, renewable biofuel,” he said.“And nearly all the corn I produce on my 2,100 acres is normally sold to this ethanol plant. Because of EPA’s actions to help pad the oil industry’s bottom line at the expense of farmers and biofuel producers, about six weeks ago, we had to make the hard decision to shut our local plant down and shut off a key local market for hundreds of farmers, including myself. Our plant has been operating for two decades — including throughout the great recession — without ever having to shut down operations.”On Oct. 15, the EPA announced a supplemental proposal to the 2020 renewable volume obligations rule, designed to account for small-refinery exemptions for 2020. The EPA proposed using average numbers from the U.S. Department of Energy on exempted gallons that come in far below actual waived gallons.Gene Gebolys, founder, president and chief executive officer of biodiesel producer World Energy, said his company has experienced the ill effects of small-refinery exemptions.“The impact on the industry is devastating,” he said.“World Energy, alone, has been forced to close three facilities, impacting more than 100 workers. EPA’s recent proposal to estimate small-refinery exemptions in 2020 will never make up for its past demand destruction. When EPA finalizes its 2020 renewable fuel obligations rule by the end of this year, it must fully account for small-refinery exemptions, or industry contraction and job losses will continue throughout the biofuels and broader agricultural economy.”The EPA is holding a public hearing in Ypsilanti, Michigan, on Wednesday on the agency’s latest supplemental proposal to the RFS.Todd Neeley can be reached at todd.neeley@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(CCSK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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There is politics in federations and among athletes: Uma Bharati

first_imgUnion minister for sports and youth affairs Uma Bharati has her plate full of controversy but she told Associate Editor Sharda Ugra that all the Arjuna Awards needed was a rewriting of rules.Q. Are the Arjuna Awards still relevant or should they be scrapped?A. The awards should not be scrapped.,Union minister for sports and youth affairs Uma Bharati has her plate full of controversy but she told Associate Editor Sharda Ugra that all the Arjuna Awards needed was a rewriting of rules.Q. Are the Arjuna Awards still relevant or should they be scrapped?A. The awards should not be scrapped. Sports persons must have their own awards. But I admit there has to be some rethinking. I have asked my office to formulate a report on how things can be improved. Next year’s awards will be different.Q. Will your changes include more sports persons on the awards panel?A. Even if we fill the committee with athletes, can you guarantee a fair selection? There is politics in federations and among athletes. I have seen them indulge in politics that will shame even the politicians.Q. What changes do you think are needed?A. We want to scrap all the clauses for relaxation of rules and use performance as the only criterion. While the rules say some performances are more valid than others, there is a clause saying that the awards committee can relax the stipulations as it thinks fit. The athletes know this and exploit the clause.Q. What about political pressure being used to hand out the awards?A. There is a difference between pressure and recommendations. The committee does not take decisions based on pressure. To say that the PMO puts pressure on us is foolish and wrong.Q. Do you think Milkha Singh’s sentiments are justified?A. These awards are not based or given on fame but on contribution. VJs are famous but we don’t give them awards. Milkha’s contribution is the same as others, but he is more famous. For him to say that he will not take the award because of who the other Arjuna awardees are is an insult to sports persons.Q. Are Rachna Govil and Milkha’s contributions to Indian sport the same? A. That was a decision of the committee. I am the chairperson and own up to the decision. Nothing unfair has happened.Q. Why do athletes need to go to court over these awards?A. Sometimes athletes are so undisciplined that the committee finds it difficult to have regard for them. I admit we may have been unfair and some deserving candidate has not been rewarded. This will always happen. It is difficult to separate awards and controversy – whether it is the Padmas, the Nobel Prize or the Oscars. So where do the Arjuna Awards stand?Q. Is it true that federation officials have been asking the athletes to pay for recommending their names for the awards?A. No athlete has come to me. The people making these claims are frustrated and are being provoked to play a political game. Do you think any Arjuna winner will stoop so low as to give an official a bribe of Rs 50,000?advertisementlast_img read more