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Want to take part in Donegal’s most scenic (and fun) 5K?

first_imgWell-known Donegal couple Maria and Danny Ryan are on a mission again.It’s a mission with two aims – to help people stay active and fit and to allow them to discover the beauty of one of Donegal’s most beautiful places, Innishboffin island.The couple, along with their family, have once again organised a 5k fun run or walk on the island this Saturday. Hopefully, they’ll be blessed with some good weather and all details of the event including boat times, etc are contained in the accompanying poster.Want to take part in Donegal’s most scenic (and fun) 5K? was last modified: July 2nd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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How Did Blue Stars Get So Close to a Black Hole?

first_imgEvery solution breeds new problems, Murphy’s Law suggests.  Astronomers working with the Hubble Space Telescope feel that pain.  While finding confirming evidence for a supermassive black hole at the center of the Andromeda Galaxy M31, they are perplexed to see a disk of hot blue stars orbiting it too close for comfort.  Estimated to be 200 million years old, the 400+ stars are in a tight orbit a light-year across and careening around the black hole at 2.2 million mph.    Blue stars are thought to be short-lived and could not have formed so close to the black hole; the extreme tidal forces there should tear the matter apart and prevent collapse into stars.  “Gas that might form stars must spin around the black hole so quickly that star formation looks almost impossible,” said one astronomer, “But the stars are there.”  They said this is like watching a magician pull a rabbit out of a hat.  “You know it happened but you don’t know how it happened.”  Since even younger stars have been found orbiting the presumed black hole at the center of the Milky Way, maybe this “odd activity” is the norm.Puzzles are good for scientists, and better observations are welcomed like rain in a desert, but scientists also need to learn to think outside the box.  One question never asked is whether these stars really are 200 million years old.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Snakes Alive!  An Evolutionary Tale

first_imgBlind snakes that look like worms: they rule the world.  They’re everywhere.  Where did they come from?  “Blindsnakes are not very pretty, are rarely noticed, and are often mistaken for earthworms,” admits Blair Hedges, professor of biology at Penn State University.  “Nonetheless, they tell a very interesting evolutionary story.”  So reported Science Daily.  National Geographic News said, “New Blind Snakes Found; Help Explain World Domination.”  But what kind of explanation is this?  Since they are found on Madagascar and on every continent, “the snakes went rafting.”  There’s a cartoon in there somewhere.    The articles reveal a puzzle and a preposterous theory.  The blind snake family arose after India and Madagascar split.  Then they showed up on Australia – an island continent with no land bridge at time of their alleged arrival.  “How did the snakes cross continents?” NG asked.  Good question.  Like worms (but with backbones and rudimentary scales and poor eyesight), these strange snakes burrow underground, and are found on every continent.  Continental drift can’t be the answer.  We don’t have any fossils of them.  How did they emerge all over the globe, including South America and the Caribbean islands?    Here is Nat Geo’s answer.  Give it your best baloney detecting analysis:In other words, the snakes went rafting, crossing oceans aboard floating vegetation stocked with their insect prey.     “Some scientists have argued that oceanic dispersal is an unlikely way for burrowing organisms to become distributed around the world,” Hedges said in a statement.    “Our data now reinforce the message that such ‘unlikely’ events nonetheless happened in evolutionary history.”Science Daily elaborated on how evolutionists came to this conclusion.  Since fossils are nonexistent for these animals, their history was inferred from genetics.  “Floating across oceans seems an unlikely mechanism for a burrowing animal to spread to new continents,” Science Daily admitted, but then proposed that it happened more than once.  If the snakes could have lived six months on vegetation rafts stocked with their insect prey, maybe, just maybe, it could have happened.  After all, in evolutionary theory, stuff happens.Welcome to modern evolutionary science, where the story’s the thing.  The more preposterous, the better.  These same people will refuse to hear (or even acknowledge) theories by Biblical creationists about how animals became distributed after the Flood.  If “unlikely events nonetheless happened in… history” is an acceptable explanation, we need a level playing field.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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SA pharma enters Latin America

first_img26 November 2007South African generic drug maker Aspen Pharmacare is expanding its international presence by acquiring half of Strides Latina, a unit of India-based Strides Arcolab that operates mainly in Brazil, Mezico and Venezuela, for US$152.5-million (about R1.03-billion).A statement released by Aspen last Tuesday pointed out that it had always been part of company strategy to enter the Latin American pharmaceutical market, but that it had been unable to find a partner company through which to enter those markets.“We have worked closely with Strides since 2003. The close collaboration of the past four years has resulted in Strides becoming a significant manufacturing and development partner to Aspen in both Africa and Australasia,” said Aspen chief executive Stephen Saad.“Today, I am happy to announce that we will forge an even closer partnership.”The acquisition of half of Strides Latina, which operates in Brazil under the name Cellofarm, in Mexico as Solara and in Venezuela under the brand Sumifarma, is just one of four transactions in the deal.Aspen and Strides will further form a joint venture to develop, manufacture and commercialise a range of oncology products on a global basis through two companies, Powercliff and Onco Therapies, in a deal costing Aspen about $42.4-million (about R287.5-million) combined.“I look forward working closely with [Aspen management] to create a solid regional Pharma company in Latin America and also am equally excited with the opportunity that the Oncolytics Joint Venture will provide in a niche and difficult domain where we intend with our partnership with Aspen to create a leading oncolytics operation,” said Strides Arcolab vice chairman Arun Kumar.The deal will also see Strides acquire a 51% interest in Co-Pharma, Aspen’s United Kingdom subsidiary, for £2.25-million (about R31.5-million), and 80% of the equity in Formula Naturelle, which will own the nutraceutical products currently marketed by Aspen in South Africa, for R35-million.Aspen explained that it sold the majority shareholding in the two companies, as it believed that Strides had a business model better suited to creating value in those businesses.“We are delighted to enhance the already rewarding partnership with Aspen and to broaden the strategic relationship into a global partnership through the four transactions being announced today,” Kumar said.“Aspen has been Strides’ first key partner and I am particularly delighted that the partnership has grown, based on strong fundamentals of capability and trust.”SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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SA starts the 2010 countdown

first_imgNational flags flew high during celebrations marking 100 days to the 2010 Fifa World Cup. There’s no doubt that South Africans are excited about the upcoming World Cup. South Africans are ready to welcome the world with the spirit of ubuntu. An excited South African blowing a kuduzela.(Images: Bongani Nkosi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Thembelihle Radebe Media & Communications Public Liaison Department City of Johannesburg +27 11 407-7353 +27 082 377 3747 ThembelihleR@joburg.org.za • Jermaine Craig Media Manager 2010  Local Organising Committee +27 11 567 2010 +27 83 201 0121 jermaine.craig@2010oc.com RELATED ARTICLES • Media wowed by 2010 stadium tour • World Cup 2010? Yes, we can • World Cup fever hits the road • World Cup ticket sales soar • World Cup fever spreads abroad • Goodwill Balls get 2010 rollingBongani NkosiIt’s less than 100 days until the world’s biggest football spectacle kicks off on African soil, and South Africa, the host nation, is gripped by euphoria as it counts down.Photo essay: 100 days to kickoffThe country marked 100 days to the 2010 Fifa World Cup in original local vibe.  Song and dance characterised celebrations in Sandton, Johannesburg, and of course the vuvuzelas blared feverishly.The nation’s flags were hoisted high by many and the green and yellow jerseys of the South African national team signified the nation’s exhilaration.The street event in Sandton, organised by the City of Johannesburg and South Africa Tourism, coincided with other celebrations across the country. From Pretoria to Durban, the country became a hive of excitement in anticipation of the tournament.“[The excitement] is about South Africa and we’re taking it to the world,” musician Brian Temba, who was based in the UK until 2009, said from stage. A number of musicians, including Khanyo Maphumulo, Lulu Dikana, Camagwini, Watershed and many others, brought the stage alive to encapsulate the excitement of South Africans for the long-awaited event.“What an amazing day. It is 100 days to go. We will have an incredible event in South Africa,” said Lupi Ngcayisa, a producer at local radio station Metro fm.Ngcayisa, who runs a charitable campaign supplying underprivileged children with new school shoes, brought the message home to fellow South Africans that their visitors will expect nothing but ubuntu when they arrive in June. “It is up to us to ensure that the people who come here are treated with the utmost respect.”Sorina “The Flooze” Erasmus from popular local soapie 7de Laan was one of the stars of the event and got everyone hyped up about the Diski Dance, a dance style she, like many other South Africans, seems to have perfected.The City of Johannesburg used the day to send a message to the world that it’s ready to welcome them. Johannesburg is the only city in the country that will host matches in two stadiums, Ellis Park and Soccer City, and will stage 15 games including the opening match, a semi-final and the final.City employee Smokey de Clown, as he identified himself, could have easily won a prize for best dressed South African on the day. With a painted face and a strange outfit, designed from his work uniform, De Clown was a real clown, but he had an important message for tourists: “We want to show the world that Joburg is ready. Bring the world cup to Joburg.”Thanks for Football FridaysDavid Mabu is one of those colourful football fanatics who never misses a Bafana Bafana game. Mabu, a staunch Kaizer Chiefs supporter, was visibly excited as he moved and swayed with the singing crowd. “I’m the happiest fan… I’m even happy that South Africans are starting to get excited.“We’re the luckiest generation. This did not happen in our fathers’ time, but it’s happening in 2010,” said Mabu.He’s grateful for Football Fridays, the campaign spearheaded by the International Marketing Council that urges people to wear a football jersey every Friday until the World Cup kicks off. “I’m impressed by whoever created the Football Fridays concept. People are starting to buy Bafana jerseys, that will inspire the team.”Encouraging Bafana BafanaNobody doubts that the nation will get behind Bafana. The vuvuzela has become an unstoppable phenomenon and it will be blaring in support of the team. The nation will sing songs of support and the world will know that “Africa’s time has come, Ke Nako” indeed, as a local slogan goes.“We should encourage Bafana Bafana in whatever way we can,” said Benedict Majatladi from Alexandra.“We know what Bafana needs, they need power. The power inside of you can do wonders,” said singer Lulu Dikana, exhorting the national squad.The main event marking the 100 days remaining to the first match, which sees South Africa and Mexico face off, took place in Durban. Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, Fifa President Sepp Blatter and about 120 local and international journalists were in attendance.“South Africans are excited for a good reason,” President Jacob Zuma said at an event in the UK. “The World Cup provides an excellent opportunity to promote our country as a place of dynamism, growth and opportunity.”last_img read more

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Agrarian distress in Madhya Pradesh continues to claim lives

first_imgThe agrarian distress in Madhya Pradesh continued to claim lives, with at least two debt-ridden farmers allegedly committing suicide in the last 48 hours, including one from Jajna village which falls under the Budhni Assembly constituency which Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan represents. As the political temperatures rose, Congress’s Madhya Pradesh heavyweight Jyotiraditya Scindia and Gujarat’s Patel quota stir spearhead Hardik Patel were turned back by the police before they could enter Mandsaur, the hub of the recent farmers’ agitation. Political leaders and social activists have continued to make futile attempts to visit Mandsaur despite peace having returned there. The Chief Minister, who came under severe attack from the Opposition following the agrarian unrest, had called off his fast on Sunday, 28 hours after its launch, claiming peace had been restored.Congress MLA bookedIn a related development, Congress MLA Shakuntala Khatik was booked for allegedly inciting people to set ablaze a police station, amid violent protests by farmers last week.Dulchand Kheer (55), a resident of Jajna village, Rehti tehsil in Sehore district, consumed some poisonous substance on Monday. “The circumstances surrounding his death is a matter of investigation,” Pankaj Geete, SHO of Rehti police station, said. The police registered a case on Tuesday.The farmer was having a debt of ₹6 lakh, alleged the Madhya Pradesh unit of the Aam Aadmi Party, whose leaders visited the family. He incurred a bank debt of ₹4 lakh and a debt of ₹2 lakh from Sahukars (local businessman), alleged Alok Agrawal, State president of the AAP. The farmer owns nine acres.Makhan Lal Digolia, a 68-year-old farmer of Bahiravpur village in Hoshangabad district, hanged himself from a tree on Tuesday. His son Rakesh Lohwanshi alleged that his father had taken a loan of ₹7 lakh from local moneylenders and had also sold nearly 7 acres in the past two years to repay the escalating interests. “My father was very depressed about the loan repayment,” he told media persons. On Sunday, Mr. Chouhan announced a slew of measures to end the farmer unrest that claimed five lives in police firing since violent protests broke out last week.(With PTI inputs)last_img read more