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A close-up look at Orion

first_img There also will be two public nights scheduled for Feb. 22 and 23. For more information and to make a reservation, call Tove at the Palmdale School District office at (661) 266-7233. The image is described as a stunning photograph of the famous Great Orion Nebula that shows the star birth cloud in unprecedented detail. The Hubble, an Earth-orbiting observatory, was launched into space on April 25, 1990. Hubble orbits above Earth’s murky atmosphere, which distorts light from celestial objects. During its more than 15 years in space, the Hubble has taken more than 700,000 snapshots of celestial objects such as galaxies, dying stars and giant gas clouds, the birthplace of stars. The telescope also shot images of chunks of a comet slamming into Jupiter and galaxies that existed billions of years ago. Karen Maeshiro, (661) 267-5744 karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PALMDALE – Palmdale School District’s Sage Planetarium will unveil Wednesday a mural-size photographic mosaic of a turbulent star birth cloud taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The planetarium is the only venue in Los Angeles County and one of two in Southern California that will debut the 4-by-4, 140-image seamless mosaic of the Great Orion Nebula. “They had everybody write in who was interested and they selected them,” planetarium director Jeremy Amarant said, explaining how Sage was chosen as one of the showcase venues. “We wanted to be one of the flagship showings.” The event is part of the Hubble Space Telescope science team’s educational outreach program, Amarant said. The image will be unveiled the same day at 60 places around the United States – and it can’t be shown until then. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson The other venue displaying it in Southern California is a science center in Santa Barbara, Amarant said. Palmdale and Santa Barbara are among the five sites in California. “We have the first printed version of it ready to go. We are part of the media release,” Amarant said. Palmdale students will view the galactic image, one of the largest images ever taken by the Hubble Telescope, from 7 a.m. to noon Wednesday. District officials and school board members are scheduled to come between noon and 3 p.m., and the public is invited from 3 to 8 p.m. The planetarium is located at 38060 20th St. East. The Hubble image can be viewed on Thursday by appointment by calling Amarant at (661) 273-7646, and on Friday from 6 to 7 p.m. last_img read more

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Want to take part in Donegal’s most scenic (and fun) 5K?

first_imgWell-known Donegal couple Maria and Danny Ryan are on a mission again.It’s a mission with two aims – to help people stay active and fit and to allow them to discover the beauty of one of Donegal’s most beautiful places, Innishboffin island.The couple, along with their family, have once again organised a 5k fun run or walk on the island this Saturday. Hopefully, they’ll be blessed with some good weather and all details of the event including boat times, etc are contained in the accompanying poster.Want to take part in Donegal’s most scenic (and fun) 5K? was last modified: July 2nd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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South Africa’s 2010 venues on target

first_imgAll eyes are on Johannesburg’s Soccer City, which will be the centre of the universe in just 16 months when it hosts both the opening ceremony and 2010 World Cup final. A recent major storm in Nelspruit resulted in some minor damage to the Mbombela Stadium, affecting 10 precast seating beams and one roof bay. However, the project is 60% complete, and is also on target to meet its deadlines. Former Dutch Sport Minister Erica Terpstra is rarely short of words, but when she led a delegation representing 37 Dutch companies on a 2010 World Cup Trade Mission to South Africa late last year, she was left speechless by Durban’s Moses Mabhida stadium. Again, project managers say they are satisfied with the progress and that the venue is now 67% complete. 16 January 2009 Like most of South Africa’s World Cup stadiums, Durban is firmly on track to meet its Fifa deadlines. The next step will be the construction of the compression ring, which will give the roof, bowl and arch the strength required to hold it together. Project managers say they are on target to meet all their deadlines. Cape Town’s Green Point stadium – the other semi-final venue – is now framed by a massive compression ring which will support the glass roof which is now being constructed in New York. That’s one less thing for South Africa to worry about with the biggest single-code sporting event in the world – let’s not mince words: the biggest spectator event in the world, period – looming fast. Of course, there have been some hiccups. Port Elizabeth is still licking its wounds after missing its deadlines for June’s Confederations Cup, but city officials say they have now set their sights on “the big one”, and that the stadium is 70% complete. In a nutshell, the army of architects, planners and construction workers tasked with building some of the finest stadiums in the world (in record time) are producing the goods. “Of all the stadiums we saw, that one is special – it would turn heads anywhere,” Terpstra said. All major refurbishments to the Confederations Cup stadiums – the Free State Stadium in Bloemfontein, Loftus Versfeld in Pretoria, the Royal Bafokeng Stadium in Rustenburg, and Ellis Park in Johannesburg – have been completed. In addition, the grass pitch is already being manicured on a farm in the Boland! This week, the last piece of the massive Y-shaped arch above the stadium was inserted to complete the 105 metre-high structure which has changed the city’s skyline. Urquhart is a former Fifa World Cup media officer and the current editor of Project 2010last_img read more

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Premier Business Awards showcase South Africa’s competitiveness

first_img30 April 2015By Charlotte Chichi MaponyaOn the evening of Thursday 9 April, the Department of Trade and Industry, in partnership with Brand South Africa and Proudly South African, co-hosted the third annual South African Premier Business Awards in Johannesburg at the Sandton Convention Centre.Brand South Africa would like to congratulate all the enterprises that entered this year’s South African Premier Business Awards. The awards recognise business excellence and honours enterprises that promote the spirit of success, innovation and job creation.Prominent commercial brands with strong reputations support a positive nation brand and it is for this reason that Brand South Africa is involved with the South African Premier Business Awards.We need to consider whether we are competitive in terms of being able to grow a nation that can compete equitably with global peers and if we are growing individual brands with solid reputations that are considered as leaders in their individual industries. This is crucial to being able to deliver on our mandate to position South Africa as a reliable and attractive destination for inward investment.As the reputation management agency for the country, Brand South Africa is mandated to develop – in conjunction with other stakeholders – and articulate the value proposition for South Africa and why the country is an attractive investment destination.The companies that entered the awards have demonstrated the strides they are making towards developing an economy that will encourage job creation, and for this we commend them. They are part of the good story we have to tell and directly contribute to positioning South Africa as an attractive investment destination.We congratulate the following award winners:Lifetime achievement: Dr Anna MokgokongManufacturer: Hazleton Pumps InternationalExporter: Canvas and TentWomen-owned business: Ekurhuleni Artisans & Skills Training CentreYoung entrepreneur: DNA Brand ArchitectsInvestor of the Year: CCI Call CentresProudly South African Enterprise: Little Green NumberPlay Your Part: Access AdvertisingSMME: Hazleton Pumps InternationalBrand South Africa’s Play Your Part award went to Access Advertising. This award aims to celebrate enterprises that excel in displaying active citizenship and nation building in South Africa.The Play Your Part Award recognises those that inspire all South Africans to contribute towards positive change within their communities. Congratulations once again to Access Advertising for playing their part in shaping South Africa’s development. Play Your Part is a nationwide programme created to inspire, empower and celebrate active citizenship in South Africa. It aims to uplift the spirit of our nation by inspiring all citizens to contribute to positive change, become involved and start doing. A nation of people who care deeply for one another and the environment in which they live is good for everyone. The South African government has put measures in place to assist small enterprises to enter the market and this has been proven in the finding of the 2015 Ease of Doing Business report.The report indicates that South Africa improved in a range of indicators including starting a business. The calibre of entrants into the South African Premier Business Awards attests to the fact that government interventions in supporting commercial enterprises – big and small – are indeed effective.The recipient of the Lifetime Achievement, Dr Anna Mokgokong, is an example of a South African who has played their part in contributing to South Africa’s economic development and assisting start-up enterprises.Dr Mokgokong, voted as one of the leading women entrepreneurs in the world in 1998, is one of only five women in South Africa to have received this prestigious award. She has been actively involved in mentoring of upcoming entrepreneurs in community projects aimed at uplifting economic conditions and for this Brand South Africa salutes her.South Africa’s global competitiveness is our collective responsibility and it is in line with the National Development Plan, we need to begin to collectively respond to creating the conditions that improve our competitiveness.Awards such as the South African Premier Business Awards highlight the strides we’ve made, and continue to make, in economic development. We look forward to next year’s awards and to honouring more champions of economic transformation.Maponya is the chair of Brand South Africalast_img read more

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Remembering South African writer Peter Abrahams: 1919 – 2017

first_imgSouth African writer Peter Abrahams died on 18 January 2017. An early pioneer in the exploration of race identity in South Africa, he was a literary giant who was at the forefront of capturing the injustice of apartheid.Writer Peter Abrahams was born in Vrededorp, Johannesburg, in 1919. He lived in London and Jamaica, and his extensive collection of fiction and non-fiction focussed on pan-Africanism and race identity in South Africa. (Image: Wikipedia)CD AndersonPeter Abrahams, who died aged 97 at his home in Saint Andrew Parish, Jamaica, was one of South Africa’s most distinguished writers. His fiction and non-fiction work challenged and dissected the complexities of the black South African identity. His biting criticism of the early days of apartheid and his exploration of pan-Africanist philosophy were fuelled by the need to tell the world of the injustice of racism and colonialism.Abrahams will be remembered best for his Mine Boy, which was added to the South African school curriculum in the early 2000s.First published in 1946, Peter Abrahams’ Mine Boy exposed the condition of black South Africans under a white regime. It presents a portrait of labour discrimination, appalling housing conditions and one man’s humanitarian act of defiance. (Image: Justseeds website)Mine Boy, a brutal story of South African urban migration, became the first novel by a black South African to be published internationally. It was the third book by a black South African to be published, after Sol Plaatje’s Mhudi in 1930 and RRR Dhlomo’s 1928 novel, An African Tragedy.“I am emotionally involved in South Africa,” Abrahams said in 1957. “If I am ever liberated from this bondage of racialism, there are some things much more exciting to me, objectively, to write about. But this world has such a social orientation, and I am involved in this world and I can’t cut myself off.”During his most prolific years, 1946 to 1966, Abrahams wrote eight novels, as well as memoirs and political essays. His 1948 novel, The Path of Thunder, inspired the ballet piece, İldırımlı yollarla, by Azerbaijani composer Gara Garayev.Abrahams’ early yearsAbrahams was born in Vrededorp, Johannesburg, in 1919 to an Ethiopian father and coloured mother.According to his obituary in The New York Times on 22 January 2017, Abrahams was inspired to read and write at a young age when he heard Shakespeare’s Othello. A prodigious student, he began contributing poetry and short fiction to so-called bantu publications after completing his basic education. As a young budding writer, he consumed literature, particularly the works of black American writers.“I read every one of the books on the shelf marked American Negro literature,” he wrote in his memoir Tell Freedom: Memories of Africa in 1954. “To (these) writings of men and women who lived a world away from me … I owe a great debt for crystallising my vague yearnings to write and for showing me the long dream was attainable.”This knowledge also inspired his political thought and his desire to capture the black South African psyche in words.Ship to LondonAfter a stint as the editor of a Durban socialist magazine in 1939, Abrahams found work aboard a ship bound for London. In the British capital, he worked as a journalist on the British Communist Party’s Daily Worker newspaper.Peter Abrahams’ 1956 novel A Wreath for Udomo was inspired by his friendships with with African intellectuals and revolutionaries in exile in the UK. The novel deals with the complex realities and conflicts between duty to nation and ideals. (Image: Justseeds website)He lived in London’s African immigrant community, meeting exiled political figures and intellectuals, including future Kenyan leader Jomo Kenyatta; Kwame Nkrumah, who would go on to lead Ghana to independence from Britain; and Trinidadian pan-Africanist George Padmore. The experience inspired his most multifaceted work, the 1956 novel A Wreath for Udomo, about political and social transitions in postcolonial Africa through the eyes of the continent’s political exiles. Renowned English literary scholar Harvey Curtis Webster called the book “the most perceptive novel … about the complex interplay between British imperialism and African nationalism”.During the 1950s, Abrahams travelled across Africa, including a return to South Africa to observe the rise of postcolonial, pan-Africanist political movements. These essays, long considered the most authoritative work on the era, were later published as Return to Goli.Settling in the CaribbeanAfter being commissioned by the British colonial office to research and write a comprehensive history of Jamaica, Abrahams wrote of the island and its people: “…in the stumbling and fumbling reaching forward of its people, is dramatized … the most hopeful image I know of the newly emerging underdeveloped world”.With his wife Daphne and their three children, he made Jamaica his home for over four decades.South Africa, however, remained foremost in his writing; in particular, it was the setting of his 1965 novel, A Night of Their Own, about the anti-apartheid underground. This inspired his 1985 magnum opus, The View From Coyaba, a detailed transgenerational novel about black struggle movements in Africa, America and the Caribbean.As he got older and the postcolonial era reached its pinnacle with the end of apartheid in the 1990s, Abrahams felt less obligation to capture the zeitgeist of black African political thought. Instead, he let new, younger literary voices speak about the evolving movement.Speaking to Caribbean Beat magazine in 2003, Abrahams said: “I became a whole person when I finally put away the exile’s little packed suitcase. When Mandela came out of jail and when apartheid ended, I ceased to have this burden of South Africa. I shed it.”Abrahams never returned to his country of birth.Overdue tribute?The Daily Maverick’s J Brooks Spector observes, in his lovingly detailed obituary of Abrahams on 25 January 2017, the often overlooked connection between South Africa and the writer, and begs an important question: “Surely there should be a (South African) library named in his honour, an endowed chair in African literature at one of the nation’s premier universities, and a publishing effort reprinting his output in a standard, uniform edition?““Embracing his memory as an early literary pioneer and impact as a writer must also take into consideration the eclecticism of his political thinking, his influence on the pan-African idea, and an ethnicity that embraced the near-totality of South African experience,” Spector concludes.Source: New York Times, Daily Maverick, South African History OnlineWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Touring dairy farms and FARC country in Colombia – Part I

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Being hired to write an analysis report for an international bank is more adventurous than it sounds. At least that was my experience in June, when the International Finance Corporation (IFC), one of the operating divisions of the World Bank, sent me to Colombia to tour several dairy farms and consult with dairy industry personnel. My overall mission, which I accepted, was to assess the current state of the industry and share in a report my findings and recommendations on opportunities to improve the economic health and productivity of the country’s dairy herds. The IFC wanted my input on how they could best put their financing resources to work.In my travels across the country, I was accompanied by an international bank representative from Australia, a translator, and Jordan, a Colombian dairy technician from the local dairy cooperative. Jordan served as our driver.As I’ll share in this and next month’s column, we experienced a land of extremes and adventure on the way to creating my report. Initially, we visited farms near Colombia’s capital, Bogota. They had ready-access to a large milk processing plant. Typically, these farms had milking parlors, modern dairy equipment and Holstein or Jersey cattle, with a few Simmental or Normandy cattle mixed in.As it was winter in the Southern Hemisphere, temperatures in north central Colombia ranged from 45to 75 degrees. And it rained nearly every day. The southern part of Colombia is about 10 degrees warmer and was rainy until we got into the mountains. In the mountains, at 12,000 feet, it was downright chilly, requiring a warm jacket. I was surprised to find that many hectares of potatoes were growing in plateaus on the mountains.The country is beautiful, but dairymen in southern Colombia face lots of adversity, as I will describe. I first met the team in Bogota, a modern city of 10 million people and traffic jams that make the congestion of New York and LA look like a Sunday afternoon drive. From 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays, traffic is restricted. Only vehicles with even numbered license plates are permitted on the city’s streets and freeways during these hours on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Vehicles with odd numbered plates are permitted on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. This schedule alternates each week.Drivers who disregard these restrictions risk arrest. However, on their off days, motorists start lining up their cars along the streets about 6:30 p.m., poised to reclaim freedom on the freeways at 7:30.Traffic, however, is one of the least of Colombia’s worries. A few months before my trip, the Colombian government signed a peace treaty with the rebel group FARC. FARC has a 20-plus-year history of producing and trafficking cocaine while flouting the police and intimidating the Colombian army and citizenry. Plus, they have supplemented their income with other nefarious activities like kidnapping and extortion. Supposedly, the treaty will make it safe to drive and work in southern Colombia.Long before the treaty, FARC ran the army out of southern Colombia and imposed their own rules on the citizenry. Citizens not affiliated with FARC kept their heads down. Many moved away. Those who remained were tied to the land by cattle ranches, small dairy operations, and food and retail businesses.FARC and the cocaine industry permeated all parts of society. My driver, Jordan, shared through our interpreter that his neighbor was a FARC general. His and the general’s children went to school together. By his harsh, guttural tone, I understood without the interpreter Jordan’s feelings for the general.Since kidnappings were a big income generator for FARC, wealthy citizens maintained private security forces. I saw this in action on a previous trip I made a year and a half ago with my wife, Kris. That time, I presented a program at a large agricultural expo similar to our Farm Science Review.On that trip, several security personnel armed with automatic rifles followed us everywhere. When we had lunch in a restaurant with a dairyman with a large herd, the security team sat in the back, watching the front entrance, which was an open-air patio.On this latest trip, I learned that four years ago a paramilitary group of ex-military troopers organized independently to challenge FARC. Their standard policy when someone from FARC stepped out of line was murder. And they buried land mines in some areas. There are no records or reliable recollections of where the mines were placed. As a result, people occasionally lose a limb or their life.The recently signed treaty called for:FARC and the paramilitary to turn in their weapons and restore ownership of private propertyThe government to grant amnesty to outlaw groups, except for capital crimes (maximum sentences for murder were set at only three years), and provide FARC members job training for lawful careers such as farming and dairy management.Progress with the peace treaty has been slow. The FARC and the paramilitary didn’t turn in their weapons until a few days ago, which was way past the deadline. Job training programs for FARC members, however, have begun. Money and land, for the most part, have yet to be returned to local citizens. As Jordan pointed out, “It is crazy to think FARC will give people their money back.”A third group of thugs, small-time hoods called dissidents, continue extorting citizens. They were not included in treaty negotiations. Apparently, the government thought of them as part of FARC. In some places, dissidents tax local citizens 30 pesos a day (2,900 pesos equal one U.S. dollar). Obviously, it isn’t much money. But as Jordan said, shrugging, “When you live next door to a FARC general and on the other side, a dissident guy, and their kids and your kids go to school together, what are you to do?” I gathered that meant he was paying the tariff.I got my own personal wakeup call to the troubles of Colombia as we headed toward the southern part of the country. Our driver handed me what I assumed was a pager, which I just stuck in my pocket. Our translator instructed that whenever I felt my life was in imminent danger, to press the button on the device and authorities would rescue me immediately.I didn’t really take it that seriously until our driver got a phone call from the security group. They demanded that I turn the device on — now!Join me back here next month, when I continue my adventures in Colombia, including a story about crossing a river as wide and mighty as the Ohio River — in a truck, without a bridge!last_img read more

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The Enterprise Marketing Disconnect that Nobody Wants to Talk About

first_imgVerl Allen 4 Ways You Can Make Your Workplace an Engine of… Digital marketing and analytics leadership veteran. Tracking First CEO. A Review of Instagram Marketing by Matthew Lucas Uber vs Lyft: Battling for Supremacycenter_img CEOs in Troubled Waters (with Myriam Joire from… Related Posts Enterprise marketing teams have a big problem that nobody wants to talk about; they have no idea if their cross-channel campaigns have performed well or completely failed. The dilemma comes from a fundamental disconnect between analytics and business intelligence (BI) tools and the thousands of marketing point solutions used to create and launch campaigns, resulting in teams making uninformed decisions and ultimately distrusting the data they spend hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of dollars to generate.  The fault isn’t with enterprise marketing and analytics tools, but stems from the fact that enterprise marketing teams are operating in silos that are often distributed across channels, geographies, and partner channels. The average enterprise marketing team uses dozens of different point solutions–compounded when you consider their agencies and other external providers–working in silos according to channel, region or product. These teams can generate thousands of placements a week across dozens of disparate marketing point solutions. Simply put, there are armies of marketers managing individual campaigns, and all of them are doing things a little differently than their counterparts. Magnify this by one of 5,000+ available marketing tools, hundreds or thousands of prospects a week, across a large enterprise, and you end up with mountains of marketing data that lack governance, uniformity, and transparency. Digital and analytics tools have done amazing things for enterprise marketing teams, including allowing them to scale operations to meet the demands of modern-day business. Now that these platforms have matured, it is essential that enterprise marketing teams find a way to ensure they get the most out of their investment and that the data being generated drives value not chaos. The era of “Big Data” allowed enterprises to make some positive strides by enabling them to scrub data and put it into data lakes for analysis. However, this capability has only perpetuated the issue. Much like first responders continually reacting to each car that careens off a cliff — rather than having the forethought to put up warning signs and guardrails at the top — data analysts are stuck trying to clean up data after the fact, rather than helping marketers prevent the problem from occurring in the first place–at the point of campaign creation.With more than 5000 marketing solutions, the need has never been greater to have data that gives the complete picture. This image of the “Martech 5000” is courtesy of chiefmartec.com.The SituationWith more than 5,000 campaign-tracking platforms on the market today and single enterprises using an average of 91 marketing cloud services, the integration of the results generated by these point solutions becomes overwhelmingly complex, and accuracy can quickly erode. How can marketers integrate these points solutions in a way that ensures data accuracy and facilitates a strong foundation for decision making? Let’s take a look at one such example:Several years ago, I consulted for a large wholesale retailer to help them locate and visualize their campaign results. I quickly realized they had nothing in place to track ROI. When I brought it up, the digital manager explained that they tried using platforms like Adobe Analytics, but were struggling to realize value out of their campaign reports because they didn’t trust the data. Instead, they based their decisions on the successes of what was happening in their brick and mortar stores, rather than their digital data. Knowing that platforms like Adobe Analytics can be great for delivering accurate results, it quickly became clear that the real concern was in making sure the data was input correctly from the start. Like so many others, they simply didn’t understand that the data you get out of analytics tools are only as good as the data you put in. So what created this problem in the first place? Typical enterprise marketing and analytics tools pull data from across an entire organization made up of thousands of employees. They need data from the marketing team, the analytics team, the web department, e-commerce, social media teams, as well as every single agency and consultant they employ. The issue is that each of these teams uses different tools and data tracking codes to track their campaigns, and since there is no standardization across the different platforms, there’s inconsistency in tracking codes across each tool used. At the end of a campaign, when analysts try to gather all the data across these departments and agencies, they find that the data simply isn’t compatible because it wasn’t structured or tracked in the same way. This results in companies investing enormous amounts of money, often millions, in enterprise marketing and analytics tools that can’t show them how campaigns actually performed. Not because the tools didn’t work, but because there is no structure or verifiability in how that data was sourced, leaving decision makers to guess how to fill in the gaps in their analytics data.From my time at Adobe and Omniture, I’ve experienced first hand just how frustrating it is to have to rely on questionable data when making important decisions about campaign spend and attribution. So when I was approached by the founders of Tracking First and heard about their solution, I was immediately intrigued.How Tracking First Can Help They explained that Tracking First is a marketing solution that puts the power to govern data across multiple channels into the hands of marketers. It does this by making sure data is tagged and input correctly from the source so that data analysts don’t have to piece together a string of fragments at the end. Every piece of data is identically gathered and verified so that campaign analytics actually show a clear picture of marketing success or failure.Like a pre-flight checklist, Tracking First makes sure that necessary steps are taken upfront to ensure that results will be clear and actionable. No longer must marketers attempt to make sense of multiple, siloed point solutions. Instead, Tracking First ensures that there is an enterprise data governance solution in place that allows marketers to create a unified view of campaign data, in real time, for easier analysis. It centralizes tracking code management to make sure data stays consistent throughout the campaign and across the enterprise. Tracking First integrates with campaign solutions (i.e. DoubleClick) so marketers can generate the tracking code, validate the data and launch campaigns. On the back end, data from Tracking First can be set up to flow directly into analytics tools like Adobe Analytics Cloud and Google Analytics, saving analysts time trying to clean up and structure data.When it comes down to it, less time spent cleaning up data means more time getting campaigns out the door and reviewing accurate data reports, and that means stakeholders can make more informed decisions. Here’s another example:One of our clients, a Fortune 500 hotel brand, was struggling to streamline its data analytics processes. Much of that data was maintained manually in large Excel spreadsheets, and failure to get the right people to use the right tools resulted in a lot of extra time spent on data clean up.  After deciding to use Tracking First, the brand’s turnaround time in tracking data shortened, and executive leaders were able to make decisions based on accurate, real-time campaign results. This improvement was reflected in a recent study that showed Tracking First customers increased report accuracy by 66 percent while time spent managing and integrating tracking data decreased by 90 percent. These numbers clearly show that enterprises don’t need to settle for inaccurate, ineffective data, and Tracking First’s growing customer base and traction in the industry proves there is growing demand for a solution. The growing company has more than 30 enterprise clients, including multiple Fortune 500 companies, all of whom rely on Tracking First for precise campaign analytics to make better-informed decisions. Venture capitalists like Silverton Partners and Kickstart Seed Fund have also recognized how widespread this problem is, and they’ve decided to invest $4 million in funding so Tracking First can continue doing what it does best: solving enterprise data problems. Throughout my 20-year career, I’ve struggled with the data disconnect that has stood in the way of being able to use campaign data to make smart business decisions. I’m looking forward to accelerating the strong growth the company has experienced and helping marketers and analysts gain deeper insights into enterprise-wide campaign performance. last_img read more