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GOL Snubs Traditional Council’s Peace Building Retreat

first_imgAt least seven government officials invited to participate in the just-ended two-day national peace building retreat by the members of the National Council of Chiefs and Elders (NACCEL), chose not to attend, and the gathering of over 250 chiefs and civil society organizations expressed disappointment about their behavior.Government officials invited included Information Minister Eugene Nagbe, National Elections Commission (NEC) chairman Jerome Korkoya, Attorney General and Justice Minister Benedict Sannoh, Finance and Development Planning Minister Amara Konneh, Senate Pro temp Amarh Jallah and House Speaker Alex Tyler. Former Internal Affairs Minister Blamo Nelson, who was also invited, was absent.Defense Minister Brownie J. Samukai, who was also invited but could not personally attend, was represented and expressed his regret and also declared declared his support for the initiative. He stated that traditional leaders must educate Liberian children to make peace with themselves in building a peaceful society for the future.Until the closure of the retreat yesterday evening, there was no official communication from the absentee government officials about their absence, which was interpreted by the elders and chiefs as a sign of disrespect.According to organizers, the retreat, which brought fifteen paramount chiefs from 15 of Liberia’s sub-political divisions, was intended to deliberate and find the way forward on recent disturbing issues that have come up in the country.On the first day of the retreat, Chief Zanzan Karwor, head of the National Council of Chiefs, catalogued events including the mysterious of death of Harry Greaves, Jr., the arrest and the subsequent disturbance by hundreds of young people who demanded the release of the victim and most of all the call for Liberia to be designated as a Christian Nation, a suggested clause which Liberian Muslims regard as a plot by some disgruntled politicians to divide the country and throw it into chaos.The theme for the first day was ‘Dialogue among leaders to promote peace and patriotism, nationalism and national symbols’ and was moderated by Cultural Ambassador Juli Endee.The second day’s theme, moderated by Rev. J. Emmanuel Z. Bowier, focused on ‘How to sustain peace using traditional mechanisms (peace hut).Other organizations that failed to send representatives included the Press Union of Liberia, Campaigner for Change and Sure Liberia, the Liberia Council of Churches, Civil Society Organization and the Lebanese Business Community.Those present were representatives of the Muslim Council of Liberia, Coalition for Transformation of Liberia, MOH-Global Communities and The Carter Center.Ambassador Endi moderated the final session, titled ‘the way forward’ but without the presence of government officials intended to get involved in the discussion and the deliberations, the elders and chiefs expressed their disappointment.The chairman of the Coalition for Transformation of Liberia, Archie Sannor, who was recently arrested and later released, told the chiefs and elders that the young people do not disrespect their leaders, including President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.However, he recounted corrupt practices by unnamed government officials that have been prosecuted and mentioned the abundant natural resources that are not used to make life better for ordinary Liberians.“We are citizens of this country, chiefs and elders, and so when things are not done for the people, we as young people have the right to demand why from our government, and this is interpreted to mean disrespect to our leaders,” Sannor argued.Sannor appealed to the elders and chiefs to engage the government to change how things are done in the country to bring real development to the land and its people. “We don’t have electricity, poor roads and even some roads are constructed three times, wasting money that could have been [saved if the job was done well the first time]. Our country, compared to others is the worst and least developed, yet we are blessed with natural resources that other countries don’t have,” he said.Representing the Muslim Council of Liberia, Ali Sylla, re-echoed the council’s position against Proposition 24, which calls for a referendum to decide making Liberia a Christian Nation, and instead recommended, among other things, education and economic empowerment to Liberians of all faiths.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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South Africa’s 2010 venues on target

first_imgAll eyes are on Johannesburg’s Soccer City, which will be the centre of the universe in just 16 months when it hosts both the opening ceremony and 2010 World Cup final. A recent major storm in Nelspruit resulted in some minor damage to the Mbombela Stadium, affecting 10 precast seating beams and one roof bay. However, the project is 60% complete, and is also on target to meet its deadlines. Former Dutch Sport Minister Erica Terpstra is rarely short of words, but when she led a delegation representing 37 Dutch companies on a 2010 World Cup Trade Mission to South Africa late last year, she was left speechless by Durban’s Moses Mabhida stadium. Again, project managers say they are satisfied with the progress and that the venue is now 67% complete. 16 January 2009 Like most of South Africa’s World Cup stadiums, Durban is firmly on track to meet its Fifa deadlines. The next step will be the construction of the compression ring, which will give the roof, bowl and arch the strength required to hold it together. Project managers say they are on target to meet all their deadlines. Cape Town’s Green Point stadium – the other semi-final venue – is now framed by a massive compression ring which will support the glass roof which is now being constructed in New York. That’s one less thing for South Africa to worry about with the biggest single-code sporting event in the world – let’s not mince words: the biggest spectator event in the world, period – looming fast. Of course, there have been some hiccups. Port Elizabeth is still licking its wounds after missing its deadlines for June’s Confederations Cup, but city officials say they have now set their sights on “the big one”, and that the stadium is 70% complete. In a nutshell, the army of architects, planners and construction workers tasked with building some of the finest stadiums in the world (in record time) are producing the goods. “Of all the stadiums we saw, that one is special – it would turn heads anywhere,” Terpstra said. All major refurbishments to the Confederations Cup stadiums – the Free State Stadium in Bloemfontein, Loftus Versfeld in Pretoria, the Royal Bafokeng Stadium in Rustenburg, and Ellis Park in Johannesburg – have been completed. In addition, the grass pitch is already being manicured on a farm in the Boland! This week, the last piece of the massive Y-shaped arch above the stadium was inserted to complete the 105 metre-high structure which has changed the city’s skyline. Urquhart is a former Fifa World Cup media officer and the current editor of Project 2010last_img read more

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The Hustler’s Playbook – Hustlers Don’t See Themselves As They Are

first_imgHustlers don’t see themselves as they really are. They see themselves as they want to be. Then they act accordingly.Look around you right now. Your smartphone is somewhere very close to you, isn’t it? It’s a modern marvel that we can carry our telephone, computer, internet, email, camera, photo album, video camera, home movies, blockbuster movies, music, newspapers, magazine, maps, address book, and global position satellite in our pocket (and the list of all the other things your smart phone does is greater than this list).What’s interesting about your smart phone is that everything that was necessary to make it has been on planet Earth since before we were. There isn’t a single element that wasn’t here since forever ago. All that was missing was vision and the knowledge.The hustler knows that success is never a matter of resources. It’s a matter of resourcefulness.Hustler’s Have VisionThe hustler sees themselves as something bigger, brighter, and better than they are now. The hustler has a vision of what they will become. The hustler’s non-hustler friends will criticize the hustler for his vision. They say things like, “Who do you think you are,” and “Do you think you are somehow better than us?”The non-hustler can’t imagine being something more. The non-hustler lacks the vision; they lack the identity. They question the hustler because they fear facing the person they could become and because they fear losing the hustler as they grow.Hustlers Are ResourcefulThe hustler knows that everything they need to grow and develop into what they must ultimately become is already inside them right now. They don’t believe that they are missing anything that they can’t somehow go acquire. The hustler looks at the gap between what they are now and what they want to be, and they go do the things they need to do to close that gap. They develop the vision. They acquire the knowledge. And they take action.The non-hustler believes that the successful are somehow anointed from birth or that someone taps them on the shoulder and hands them their success. The non-hustler doesn’t believe that what they need to succeed lies dormant in them right now, this very second. They believe that the circumstances of the birth would need to be different for them to succeed. They believe they’d need permission, a formal degree, or more money to get started.The non-hustler sees themselves as what they are, with no vision of what they could become. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more