0

Dr Paul Wright: Swift decision needed to fix horse racing industry

first_img NEGOTIATIONS Last week, the best kept secret in horse racing in Jamaica was officially exposed. There was a statement from the Government that Supreme Ventures was now the preferred bidder in the much ballyhooed divestment of Caymanas Park, the only racetrack in the island. Although everybody at the track knew that Supreme Ventures had won months before, the comments from the vice president of the trainers’ association and the president of the Jamaica Racehorse Owners Association (JROA) reflected sentiments at the track that racing NEEDED divestment. Some of the older (and wiser?) fans and punters at the track were very wary of the announcement, however, as they remembered that there were two previous ‘preferred bidders’ in the planned divestment of racing out of the hands of Government and into the hands of private individuals (or companies) with the knowledge and the money that is so vital in the successful promotion of racing, as the Danny Melville-led Board showed some year s ago. Both bids came to nought. So after the collective sigh of relief from the representatives of the stakeholders in racing, came the return to reality by statements from Paul Hoo, a representative of Supreme Ventures and from lawyers representing the present champion jockey at the track, Shane Ellis. First, Mr Hoo reminded all of us in racing that the title ‘preferred bidder’ only means that negotiations for the divestment will now begin in earnest and the lawyers for Mr Ellis obtained an injunction in the courts that restrained the planned divestment until the promoting company, Caymanas Track Limited (CTL), settled a lawsuit brought by Mr Ellis against the CEO of the track, who made comments (deemed derogatory by Mr Ellis and his lawyers). Those comments were made after Mr Ellis fell from a horse during a race some years ago. So for at least the next 9-12 months the status quo at the track remains – no Board in place and management that has become decidedly worse after the ‘preferred bidder’ official statement. For example, ‘technical difficulties’ is now the official response to queries about race day incidents that reek of incompetence. Last Saturday, a race was held up for at least 15 minutes because of ‘technical difficulties’ at the starting gate. It turned out that the gates “malfunctioned” because of a “lack of power”. This was quickly remedied by the frantic call for an electrician – obviously transported in a van racing from the starting gate to the grandstand area over and over again – to correct a problem that scheduled and regular maintenance checks could have prevented. The first race, on more than one occasion, has been delayed by “technical difficulties” when investigations revealed that a crucial member of the management team was “late” coming to work. Betting terminals at Off Track betting stations are turned on up to one hour late on race days because of “technical difficulties”, which on investigation revealed that crucial operatives “came to work late”. Horses are withdrawn from races because of lameness or illness the day before racing are not declared as late non-starters until a few minutes before the scheduled start of the race, playing havoc with the important exotic wagers of punters whose selection is now transferred to the ‘on time favourite’, which in some case have very little or no chance of winning and therefore depriving the knowledgeable punter from choosing another horse with a more realistic winning chance. I could go on and on. Racing cannot continue like this. The Chinese ambassador has praised the present Prime Minister, Andrew Holness, for his penchant for making “quick decisions”. Racing people are now calling for a swift decision by his Government to try to correct the present promotion of racing. TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIESlast_img read more

0

‘Anything is possible’ – Thompson says race execution key to getting national record

first_img POWERING AWAY Despite winning the women’s 100m in a wind-aided 10.71 seconds at Saturday night’s 13th Jamaica International Invitational at the National Stadium, IAAF World Championship 200m silver medallist Elaine Thompson rued not executing a ‘complete race’. The time is not official because the wind reading was +2.4, above the allowable +2.0 mps limit. Thompson, whose 100m PB is 10.84 seconds, believes that with good race execution and ideal conditions, she could better the national 100m mark (10.70 seconds), which is held by her training partner, Olympic and World Champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. “Anything is possible, hopefully,” Thompson said of her chances of getting the national record in her post-race interview. Speaking about her race execution, Thompson said: “… Not the first part only, I am working on all of the 100m. My first 30 metres is not the best, so I am trying to work on that more.” Continuing, she said: “The comparison between last year and this year, I mean, last year, I was a collegiate athlete. I am not racing that much this year, but I’ll just keep on training and putting in the work and go out there and deliver.” The 23-year-old’s time was greeted by voracious cheers of approval from the National Stadium crowd. She ran from Lane Four, stamped her class over the final 20 metres and powered from the rest of a competitive field, which included American English Gardner (10.85), who finished second, and Trinidad & Tobago’s Michelle-Lee Ahye (10.98), who placed third. The meet record is 10.86, set by American Carmelita Jeter in 2011. Thompson reiterated that she has been “training really hard and happy to come out victorious”. “It’s a stepping stone for me to see where I’m at, so I have to go home and train harder and see the mistake that I made and see if I can correct it from there,” emphasised the MVP athlete. Meanwhile, Thompson is not sure what sprint event(s) she will do at trials for this summer’s Oympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, but leaves the decision to veteran tactician Stephen Francis. “I am not sure. My coach will decide. My training has been going okay so far, so I’ll just continue doing my best out there at all times.”last_img read more

0

What To Expect At The Wilmington Farmers Market On September 16

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington Farmers Market will be open this Sunday, September 16, 2018, from 10am to 1pm, on the Swain Green, across from the Town Common, at 140 Middlesex Avenue.September 16 Farmers Market Lineup:Vendors:Arrowhead FarmBeads By BarbaraDeano’s PastaEJ’s Fresh Frozen Pizza / Grab & GoGaouette FarmGrace GranolaJessy Cate’s CupcakesPurple Carrot BreadRed AntlerSeafood ExpressSusan Anton LMTSquare Inch FarmTewksbury HoneyAdditional Attractions:Balloons with YarrowCub Scout Pack 126Chickens at the Kids TableLive Music with Anne Sandstrom & John LorentzLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWhat To Expect At The Wilmington Farmers Market On September 1In “Community”What To Expect At The Wilmington Farmers Market On Sunday, September 8In “Community”What To Expect At The Wilmington Farmers Market On August 11In “Community”last_img read more

0

Embarrassing typo on millions of Australian currency notes leaves Reserve Bank redfaced

first_imgThe Reserve Bank in Australia was left red-faced after an Instagram user shared a photo of an embarrassing typo on its currency notes. Australian radio Triple M exposed the typo after a listener sent a photo. The typo was in the microscopic print near Edith Cowen’s image, reports CNBC.The post showed that the word ‘responsibility’ was missing the third ‘i’ and was spelt ‘responsibilty’. The error is there in three places.The word was present in the text of the speech that Cowen had given to the WA Parliament as the first Australian woman MP. She had given the speech in 1921.The text on the new note reads, “It is a great responsibilty [sic] to be the only woman here, and I want to emphasise the necessity which exists for other women being here.”The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) acknowledged the error and said that the mistake will be rectified in the next print run which is scheduled to take place at the end of this year. Currently, there are 46 million $50 notes with the spelling error.Explaining the delay, the RBA’s spokesperson said, “The process of designing and printing a banknote is complex and iterative. We have strict quality assurance processes, but like any manufacturing process, errors can occur. We have reviewed our processes to remove the likelihood of such an error occurring in the future.”Along with Edith Cowen’s speech, the microscopic text also contains excerpts from Unaipon’s book and Legendary Tales of the Australian Aborigines.The note was printed and rolled out in October 2018 with a series of new technology to prevent counterfeiting as well as to remain accessible for the visually impaired. One of the new features are the four new bumps on the note for easy identification.last_img read more

0

Life through her lenses

first_imgOne winter morning in 2013, when filmmaker Chitvan Gill, witnessed a grim patch of land turning overnight into a Kashmiri shantytown, she assumed the migration resulted from yet another turbulence in the valley.“I used to go to this area in East Delhi very often and suddenly out of the blue one morning, I come across a camp, just overnight. With the ongoing unrest in Kashmir in 2013, I thought it had got something to do with that. They must have fled their homes,” said Gill. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’But, as she delved deeper into their homes, stories unfurled breaking stereotypes associated with the lives of those hailing from Jammu and Kashmir.Gill has captured their stories and way of life that has endured unnoticed in hidden corners of the national capital, in her two-day photo exhibition, Winterlude: A season in Delhi held at Alliance Francaise de Delhi.“When I started enquiring, I realised there’s nothing to do with any trouble, there’s nothing to do with any terrorism,” she says. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“This was a journey that thousands of impoverished peasants and farmers of Kashmir have been making to Delhi for more than four decades. Each year, as a mantle of snow descends over the idyllic Kashmir Valley, they flee here, to this flattened remain of a landfill, to escape the bitter chill,” says the photographer.The exhibition, which is a visual inquiry, into the lives of the unlikely nomads, captured and communicated their varied moods through a collection of 65 photographs. Almost like an oxymoron, gleaming faces of children with cracked cheeks, running noses and greased limbs, running amidst squalor, were recurrent in Gill’s exhibition.“The children were what was most remarkable about the camp. You forgot the filth and acid smoke and were drawn into their sheer joy, their laughter. Oblivious to the ugliness and degradation, it is a carnival, a time of unbridled exuberance and play for them,” said Gill. Gill says she has captured them in some of the most ordinary postures, but the freshness in expression, makes the pictures stand out.Other pictures document several aspects of their daily lives, from setting up their hutments, to their means of survival.“Stakes are driven into the ground, bamboo poles and splints form flimsy scaffoldings, blanketed over by bright sheets of tarpaulin,” she added.Hailing from an agricultural background, most of them, she says, “live off their earnings from their seven months in the valley, while a few engage in the uncanny business of ‘chanda’ collection.” The exhibition was an outcome of Gill’s photographing in East Delhi over a span of two winters, of 2013 and 2014.“Both the years, they came much later due to floods and elections,” she said.“While they were very happy being photographed, there was an evident ‘worriness’ about coming out into the open, for the obvious reason of being associated with violence,” she says vindicating why she has deliberately refrained from mentioning the exact location of the settlement.last_img read more

0

14yearold girl dies of dengue at RG Kar

first_imgKolkata: A 14-year-old girl from North 24-Parganas died of dengue at RG Kar Medical College and Hospital on Sunday.The victim, Amrita Singh (14), was brought to RG Kar Medical College and Hospital on Sunday morning with fever. She died at the hospital at around 3.15 pm. The death certificate issued by the hospital authorities mentions that the patient died of NS 1 reactive fever with shock syndrome.The hospital authorities will submit a report on the death of the minor girl to the state Health department. It was learnt that the victim was suffering from fever for the past few days. A resident of Belghoria in North 24-Parganas, Amrita complained of fever a few days ago after which she was taken to a local doctor. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeHe treated her for a few days. As her condition deteriorated, the patient was taken to hospital in the morning. According to hospital sources, the patient was in a serious condition when she was admitted to the hospital. Her condition deteriorated since her admission.It may also be mentioned that a housewife died of dengue at a city hospital last month after she suffered from fever for a couple days. An 11-year-old boy died of the same disease at a private hospital in Kolkata in last month as well.last_img read more