0

GOL Snubs Traditional Council’s Peace Building Retreat

first_imgAt least seven government officials invited to participate in the just-ended two-day national peace building retreat by the members of the National Council of Chiefs and Elders (NACCEL), chose not to attend, and the gathering of over 250 chiefs and civil society organizations expressed disappointment about their behavior.Government officials invited included Information Minister Eugene Nagbe, National Elections Commission (NEC) chairman Jerome Korkoya, Attorney General and Justice Minister Benedict Sannoh, Finance and Development Planning Minister Amara Konneh, Senate Pro temp Amarh Jallah and House Speaker Alex Tyler. Former Internal Affairs Minister Blamo Nelson, who was also invited, was absent.Defense Minister Brownie J. Samukai, who was also invited but could not personally attend, was represented and expressed his regret and also declared declared his support for the initiative. He stated that traditional leaders must educate Liberian children to make peace with themselves in building a peaceful society for the future.Until the closure of the retreat yesterday evening, there was no official communication from the absentee government officials about their absence, which was interpreted by the elders and chiefs as a sign of disrespect.According to organizers, the retreat, which brought fifteen paramount chiefs from 15 of Liberia’s sub-political divisions, was intended to deliberate and find the way forward on recent disturbing issues that have come up in the country.On the first day of the retreat, Chief Zanzan Karwor, head of the National Council of Chiefs, catalogued events including the mysterious of death of Harry Greaves, Jr., the arrest and the subsequent disturbance by hundreds of young people who demanded the release of the victim and most of all the call for Liberia to be designated as a Christian Nation, a suggested clause which Liberian Muslims regard as a plot by some disgruntled politicians to divide the country and throw it into chaos.The theme for the first day was ‘Dialogue among leaders to promote peace and patriotism, nationalism and national symbols’ and was moderated by Cultural Ambassador Juli Endee.The second day’s theme, moderated by Rev. J. Emmanuel Z. Bowier, focused on ‘How to sustain peace using traditional mechanisms (peace hut).Other organizations that failed to send representatives included the Press Union of Liberia, Campaigner for Change and Sure Liberia, the Liberia Council of Churches, Civil Society Organization and the Lebanese Business Community.Those present were representatives of the Muslim Council of Liberia, Coalition for Transformation of Liberia, MOH-Global Communities and The Carter Center.Ambassador Endi moderated the final session, titled ‘the way forward’ but without the presence of government officials intended to get involved in the discussion and the deliberations, the elders and chiefs expressed their disappointment.The chairman of the Coalition for Transformation of Liberia, Archie Sannor, who was recently arrested and later released, told the chiefs and elders that the young people do not disrespect their leaders, including President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.However, he recounted corrupt practices by unnamed government officials that have been prosecuted and mentioned the abundant natural resources that are not used to make life better for ordinary Liberians.“We are citizens of this country, chiefs and elders, and so when things are not done for the people, we as young people have the right to demand why from our government, and this is interpreted to mean disrespect to our leaders,” Sannor argued.Sannor appealed to the elders and chiefs to engage the government to change how things are done in the country to bring real development to the land and its people. “We don’t have electricity, poor roads and even some roads are constructed three times, wasting money that could have been [saved if the job was done well the first time]. Our country, compared to others is the worst and least developed, yet we are blessed with natural resources that other countries don’t have,” he said.Representing the Muslim Council of Liberia, Ali Sylla, re-echoed the council’s position against Proposition 24, which calls for a referendum to decide making Liberia a Christian Nation, and instead recommended, among other things, education and economic empowerment to Liberians of all faiths.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

0

Impatience Poll results

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The Associated Press-Ipsos poll on public attitudes about impatience and waiting is based on telephone interviews with 1,003 adults in the United States from all states except Alaska and Hawaii. The interviews were conducted March 28-30 by Ipsos, an international polling firm. Results were weighted to represent the population by demographic factors such as age, sex, region, race and income. No more than one time in 20 should chance variations in the sample cause the results to vary by more than 3 percentage points from the answers that would be obtained if all Americans were polled. There are other sources of potential error in polls, including the wording and order of questions. Results may not total 100 percent because of rounding. 1. Thinking about the places and times when you have to wait in line for something, what would you say is the place where you most hate having to wait? (OPEN-END) -Store check-out line (subtotal), 34 percent —Grocery store, 23 percent —Wal-Mart, 5 percent —Check-out line/store (unspecified), 5 percent —Other store mentions. 1 percent -Government office (subtotal), 20 percent —Department of Motor Vehicles, 14 percent —Post office, 5 percent —Government office (unspecified), 1 percent —Other government office mentions, 1 percent -Medical mentions (subtotal), 10 percent —Doctor’s office, 7 percent —Hospital, 2 percent —Emergency room, 1 percent -Bank, 6 percent -Restaurant (subtotal), 6 percent —Restaurant (unspecified), 4 percent —Fast food restaurant, 2 percent -Traffic, 3 percent -Airport, 3 percent -Bathroom, 1 percent -Gas station, 1 percent -Amusement park, 1 percent -Other, 7 percent -None, 2 percent -Not sure, 5 percent 2. I’m going to read you a list of items. As I read each one, please tell me if this ever causes you to lose your patience, or not. How about … does this ever cause you to lose your patience or not? Waiting on hold on the telephone -Yes, 77 percent -No, 23 percent Waiting for people who are late -Yes, 67 percent -No, 32 percent -Not sure, 1 percent Waiting in line at a government office -Yes, 59 percent -No, 38 percent -Not sure, 3 percent Slow restaurant service -Yes, 58 percent -No, 41 percent -Not sure, 1 percent Getting caught in slow traffic -Yes, 57 percent -No, 43 percent Waiting in line to be waited on in a store -Yes, 50 percent -No, 49 percent -Not sure, 1 percent Waiting for a doctor’s appointment -Yes, 46 percent -No, 54 percent Waiting for a repair person -Yes, 42 percent -No, 57 percent -Not sure, 1 percent Looking for a parking space -Yes, 35 percent -No, 65 percent Waiting for a bus or train -Yes, 18 percent -No, 77 percent -Not sure, 5 percent 3. In the last few months, have you ever gotten impatient with someone while waiting and spoken rudely to them or not? -Yes, 17 percent -No, 82 percent -Not sure, 1 percent 4. Thinking about stores or offices where you have experienced long waits, in general, which of the following do you think is the most important cause of long waits? -Poor planning by management, 54 percent -Incompetent employees, 20 percent -Too many customers, 24 percent -Not sure, 2 percent 5. When you are waiting in line in a store or office, how long are you usually able to wait before you lose your patience? -No time at all, 3 percent -5 minutes or less, 20 percent -6-10 minutes, 19 percent -11-15 minutes, 18 percent -16-20 minutes, 11 percent -21-30 minutes, 13 percent -More than 30 minutes, 10 percent -Not sure, 6 percent 6. When you are waiting on hold on the telephone, how long are you usually able to wait before you lose your patience? -No time at all, 2 percent -5 minutes or less, 52 percent -6-10 minutes, 22 percent -11-15 minutes, 9 percent -16-20 minutes, 5 percent -21-30 minutes, 4 percent -More than 30 minutes, 3 percent -Not sure, 3 percent 7. When you make a telephone call to a business and you are placed on hold, what do you like to hear? Music -Yes, 82 percent -No, 18 percent A computerized estimate of the wait -Yes, 59 percent -No, 40 percent -Not sure, 1 percent Talk radio -Yes, 40 percent -No, 59 percent -Not sure, 1 percent Silence -Yes, 29 percent -No, 70 percent -Not sure, 1 percent Advertisements for the company’s products and services -Yes, 26 percent -No, 74 percent 8. Have you ever refused to return to a business because of long waits, or not? -Yes, 50 percent -No, 50 percent Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. last_img read more