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MAN INJURED AFTER BEING ATTACKED BY ARMED INTRUDERS

first_imgBREAKING NEWS: A man has been hospitalised after being attacked by two armed intruders at a house in Raphoe.Gardai have examined the scene of the incident in Raphoe.The man was in the house at Castlegrove when the two men burst into the house this morning.A struggle ensued and the man received a blow to the head. He was taken to Letterkenny General Hospital where he received treatment before being released.The intruders fled the house unhurt.Although it is believed that the men were carrying firearms, no shots were fired.The area was sealed of by Gardai who are carrying out a full investigation into the incident. Gardai do not believe that robbery was the motive for the attack.MAN INJURED AFTER BEING ATTACKED BY ARMED INTRUDERS was last modified: July 14th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:assaultattackCastlegrovedonegalintrudersRaphoelast_img read more

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How Did Blue Stars Get So Close to a Black Hole?

first_imgEvery solution breeds new problems, Murphy’s Law suggests.  Astronomers working with the Hubble Space Telescope feel that pain.  While finding confirming evidence for a supermassive black hole at the center of the Andromeda Galaxy M31, they are perplexed to see a disk of hot blue stars orbiting it too close for comfort.  Estimated to be 200 million years old, the 400+ stars are in a tight orbit a light-year across and careening around the black hole at 2.2 million mph.    Blue stars are thought to be short-lived and could not have formed so close to the black hole; the extreme tidal forces there should tear the matter apart and prevent collapse into stars.  “Gas that might form stars must spin around the black hole so quickly that star formation looks almost impossible,” said one astronomer, “But the stars are there.”  They said this is like watching a magician pull a rabbit out of a hat.  “You know it happened but you don’t know how it happened.”  Since even younger stars have been found orbiting the presumed black hole at the center of the Milky Way, maybe this “odd activity” is the norm.Puzzles are good for scientists, and better observations are welcomed like rain in a desert, but scientists also need to learn to think outside the box.  One question never asked is whether these stars really are 200 million years old.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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South Africans told: ‘Go Open’

first_img17 February 2005The Go Open Source campaign is an R18-million investment by Hewlett-Packard, the Shuttleworth Foundation and the CSIR to promote the use of open source software among South African home users, scholars and small businesses.IT entrepreneur and “afronaut” Mark Shuttleworth has sponsored a number of projects to promote South African awareness, uptake and growth of open source (OS), a model of software development that challenges traditional forms of copyright and intellectual property.The drive behind the campaign is to make OS software easily available to all users that want it, irrespective of where they live or work.Shuttleworth built his company Thawte using OS software. His foundation nows sponsors a range of educational projects, including Go Open Source and Translate.org.za.The most visible aspect of this campaign is the world’s first television series devoted to open source software. “go_open” is a 13-episode series that highlights the benefits of OS techology for home users with features like “On the Web” and “Geek of the Week”.According to Go Open Source, South Africans spend R6-billion a year on software licences, and 80% of that leaves the country.To encourage the use of OS software at home, Go Open Source offers free copies of the OpenCD on its website. This CD contains a number of OS programmes that are useful for the desktop user, including OpenOffice and the graphics programme GIMP. These are full products containing all the features one would expect from expensive, proprietary programmes.‘Free, as in freedom’The term “open source” (OS) refers to software for which the source code is publicly available. Generally, the software is distributed free with the source code.Not all OS software is free, however, and advocates often qualify the term by saying: “Free, as in freedom”. With OS, the user has the freedom to view the source code, the freedom to make changes, and the freedom to distribute the software.OS refers to the ability to view the source code, which allows developers to improve, make changes or translate the programme. These improvements can then be added to the original programme, to the benefit of all users.For popular OS programmes, this means that there may be hundreds of thousands of developers contributing to and improving the programme, in a collaborative manner.This model of software development challenges traditional forms of copyright and intellectual property.One of the primary benefits that OS software development offers is the ability to translate programmes into whichever language is required with relative ease.Since its release in November 2004, the OS browser Firefox has already been translated into Afrikaans, isiXhosa, isiZulu, seSotho and seSotho sa Leboa – all translations facilitated by non-profit organisation Translate.org.za.Southern SmileGovernments, including South Africa’s, are driving much of the interest in OS software around the world. For developing nations particularly, OS may offer many advantages over traditional proprietary software. The most obvious of these is cost, but OS also offers increased flexibility and reduced dependence on software vendors.This uptake of OS software in the Southern Hemisphere has been dubbed the “Southern Smile”.The SA Government Information Technology Officers’ Council has committed itself to exploring the possibilities of OS use, and to making software procurement choices based on merit, “giving OS software and proprietary software equal opportunities to be selected”.The council also recognised that “OS software offers significant indirect advantages”.Although South Africa is widely recognised as a vocal advocate of OS, the country has yet to match Brazil in terms of adoption of OS technology.In 2003, Brazilian president Lula da Silva committed the largest economy in South America to the adoption of OS software, with the head of that country’s IT Institute saying that paying software licensing fees was economically unsustainable.It is no coincidence that governmental OS use is being pioneered in the same southern nations that have called for compulsory licensing of patented medicines. In both cases, it is felt that the intellectual property rights of multi-national corporations are priviledged over the needs of developing nations.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Clarity on Jacob Zuma’s wives

first_img7 January 2010South African President Jacob Zuma, who practises polygamy in keeping with traditional African culture, has not five but three wives, any of whom may accompany him on official engagements.In a statement aimed at correcting media reports following Zuma’s wedding to Tobeka Madiba-Zuma on the weekend, the Presidency said that South Africa’s Constitution and public service regulations did not make provision for a First Lady or First Ladies, and that there was thus “no such official designation”.Contrary to media reports, Zuma has not five but three wives: Sizakele Khumalo, Nompumelelo Ntuli, and Tobeka Madiba. He also has a fiancee, Bongi Ngema.When it comes to official or public engagements, the Presidency said, it is up to Zuma to decide whether he is accompanied by any or all of his wives. “This is his prerogative, and has been the practice since he took office.”The Presidency said it provided “administrative support” to the President’s wives through its spousal office, “as has been the practice in past administrations”.While Zuma’s wives might take part in community work or other activities that supported the President’s work, this was purely voluntary, as they were not part of the Presidency or the public service.MaKhumalo (in isiZulu culture, married or adult women have the prefix “Ma” added to their surnames), whose area of interest is agriculture and food security, runs a vegetable garden project in Zuma’s home village of Nkandla in KwaZulu-Natal.KaMadiba (the prefix “Ka” is used for names already beginning with “Ma”) is interested in health care, especially work relating to the fight against cervical cancer. MaNtuli’s focus is on social development; she works to help orphans and vulnerable children.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Paying it forward with goat farming

first_imgJulia Ngwana went from being an unemployed single mother to a successful goat farmer, which has earned her enough money to send her children to schooland university. (Image: Heifer International South Africa) MEDIA CONTACTS • Magdalena Wos   Heifer International South Africa   +27 31 777 1374RELATED ARTICLES • Farming to fight child malnutrition • SA wine farms invest in biodiversity • Mega development for central Africa • Not just a fluffy face Wilma den HartighJulia Ngwana went from being an unemployed single mother to a successful goat farmer, thanks to the help of Heifer International South Africa, a community development organisation.After starting off small with two goats, Ngwana grew her venture over time and raised enough money to give her children a quality education. Her daughter Dakalo is now in her third year of a BSc degree at the University of Venda.Living on the breadline“My husband left us when my first born was doing grade four and I did not know what to do because I wanted my children to go to school,” she says. Suddenly, Ngwana was left without any means to support her four children.As an interim measure, a social worker was able to arrange for the family to receive a monthly 5kg package of food, as well as soap. The food parcel made a big difference to the family’s situation, but it was not enough to feed five people for the month.She also had to walk 30km every month, from Tshitavha to Thenowa villages in Limpopo province, to collect the food parcels.Without an income Ngwana was unable to pay her children’s school fees, and her first born daughter, Livhuwani, had to stop going to school. Even a letter from the chief of her area, explaining the circumstances, did not help.Paying it forwardBut things started to change when Ngwana began working with Heifer International South Africa.The organisation works with communities in an effort to end hunger and poverty in the country.Magdalena Wos, resource development officer at Heifer, says the project’s goal is to help vulnerable people in society, particularly single-parent families and women. However, male beneficiaries are not excluded.The project provides families in need with livestock and training in animal management to ensure the animals remain healthy and productive.The organisation has a unique development approach that focuses on “Passing on the Gift” – a practical way of sharing and caring, Wos explains.Every family that receives livestock agrees to pass on the first female offspring, training and skills they have acquired to another needy family, as identified by the original beneficiary.This is exactly what Ngwana did when she started working with Heifer International as part of the Saambandou Project in Limpopo in 2007. Through the project, she received training and two goats.Soon after the goats arrived, the doe gave birth to twins. Ngwana immediately passed on the “gift” to another needy family, fulfilling her commitment to Heifer International.“I looked after the goats very well and then they again gave birth to twins. I was able to sell six goats for my daughter to register with the University of Venda,” she says.Since receiving the first two goats, she has raised 12 goats. Every so often she sells a few more to generate additional income to support her family and keep her children in school. She also grows vegetables in her garden, from which she earns about R350 (US$42) per month.The family is now self-sustainable and no longer relies on handouts.Ngwana’s daughter also wants to get involved with the Heifer project. When she finishes her studies, she wants to buy four goats, two for her mother and another two for the Saambandou project, to help another poor family.“There are many fascinating stories that show how Heifer International has empowered people with tools and knowledge to build their own businesses,” Wos says.Heifer has helped more than 3 000 households in South African communities affected by high levels of unemployment, malnutrition and a degraded environment.Project manager Elizabeth Lefoka speaks highly of Ngwana: “She was struggling a lot, but she was very dedicated and she raised the goats very well,” Lefoka says.Although she has already met her commitments to the Heifer initiative, she is still passing on knowledge, skills and a positive attitude to other families in Tshitavha.last_img read more

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RCMP seeks cause of illnesses suffered by Canadian diplomats in Cuba Official

first_imgOTTAWA – Eight Canadians required followup medical care after diplomats and family members in Cuba suffered unexplained ailments, a senior Global Affairs official says.A total of 27 people from 10 diplomatic families underwent testing when some complained of dizziness, nosebleeds or headaches — symptoms that developed amid concern about possible acoustic attacks.There is no indication anyone has suffered permanent damage and the eight who needed additional care have since returned to work or school, the official said Wednesday at a media briefing.The RCMP is leading a government-wide investigation into the illnesses, which remain a mystery, he said.Canada is working with the United States — many of whose personnel in Havana also took ill — and Cuban authorities to try to solve the puzzle.The United States appears to be no closer to finding answers.The Canadian official spoke to the media on condition he not be identified, an effort by Global Affairs to shed light on the odd occurrences without compromising privacy of the families or security in Cuba.Cuba seems as baffled by all of this as Canada and the U.S., he said. The island nation welcomes about 1.2 million Canadian tourists a year, and therefore has real incentive to get to the bottom of the issue.Last April, U.S. representatives in Havana asked the Canadian and other embassies if staff had been hearing any strange sounds or experiencing medical symptoms.Some American diplomats had reported such symptoms since December 2016. In May 2017, a number of Canadian staff came forward.Recently declassified memos show the federal government sent a doctor to Havana in June to examine diplomats and family members. The visit by Dr. Jeffrey Chernin of Health Canada revealed symptoms similar to those experienced by U.S. staff.Word of the perplexing phenomenon started percolating publicly during the summer, fuelling theories about the cause of the illnesses. Sonic attacks, contaminated air or water and even persistent noise from crickets have been floated as possibilities.The notion of some kind of auditory assault stemmed from the fact U.S. personnel complained of hearing a high-pitched sound before experiencing symptoms. This has been less of a factor with the Canadians.Canada is conducting environmental assessments of its embassy and all diplomatic residences. It has also stepped up security measures in conjunction with the Cuban government.The United States brought many diplomats home from Havana last year and expelled Cuban representatives from Washington.In August, Ottawa acknowledged that an unspecified number of Canadians in Cuba had been affected.The official said Wednesday that three diplomatic families had returned to Canada out of concern about the strange illnesses. Two of these families had experienced symptoms.But staff levels at the mission in Cuba remain at usual levels, as some new diplomats — fully apprised of the medical issues — have arrived in Havana, the official said.Most of the cases involving Canadians developed in May, though there were separate incidents in August and December of individuals feeling strong waves of pressure, he added.At this point, Global Affairs has no reason to believe that Canadian tourists could be at risk.— Follow @JimBronskill on Twitterlast_img read more