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‘Anything is possible’ – Thompson says race execution key to getting national record

first_img POWERING AWAY Despite winning the women’s 100m in a wind-aided 10.71 seconds at Saturday night’s 13th Jamaica International Invitational at the National Stadium, IAAF World Championship 200m silver medallist Elaine Thompson rued not executing a ‘complete race’. The time is not official because the wind reading was +2.4, above the allowable +2.0 mps limit. Thompson, whose 100m PB is 10.84 seconds, believes that with good race execution and ideal conditions, she could better the national 100m mark (10.70 seconds), which is held by her training partner, Olympic and World Champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. “Anything is possible, hopefully,” Thompson said of her chances of getting the national record in her post-race interview. Speaking about her race execution, Thompson said: “… Not the first part only, I am working on all of the 100m. My first 30 metres is not the best, so I am trying to work on that more.” Continuing, she said: “The comparison between last year and this year, I mean, last year, I was a collegiate athlete. I am not racing that much this year, but I’ll just keep on training and putting in the work and go out there and deliver.” The 23-year-old’s time was greeted by voracious cheers of approval from the National Stadium crowd. She ran from Lane Four, stamped her class over the final 20 metres and powered from the rest of a competitive field, which included American English Gardner (10.85), who finished second, and Trinidad & Tobago’s Michelle-Lee Ahye (10.98), who placed third. The meet record is 10.86, set by American Carmelita Jeter in 2011. Thompson reiterated that she has been “training really hard and happy to come out victorious”. “It’s a stepping stone for me to see where I’m at, so I have to go home and train harder and see the mistake that I made and see if I can correct it from there,” emphasised the MVP athlete. Meanwhile, Thompson is not sure what sprint event(s) she will do at trials for this summer’s Oympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, but leaves the decision to veteran tactician Stephen Francis. “I am not sure. My coach will decide. My training has been going okay so far, so I’ll just continue doing my best out there at all times.”last_img read more

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Commissioners paid despite inactive

first_imgCommissioners of the Public Procurement Commission (PPC) have been raking in super salaries over the last few months, even though the body has not been inactive.President David Granger in October last swore-in members of the much anticipated PPC, which was expected to take the brunt of the work off the shoulders of Government Ministers in the awarding of contracts.Members of the new Public Procurement Commission posed with President David Granger in October shortly after their appointmentBut Cabinet still continues to grant its no-objection to the awarding of contract because the five-member Commission has been unable to perform its duties owing to a shortage of staff.Minister of State Joseph Harmon, during a post-Cabinet press briefing on Friday, announced that Cabinet gave its no-objection for several contracts.When prompted, he explained that the PPC is still inactive because it is still in the process of recruiting competent employees.“Cabinet will stop granting its no-objection when the PPC is ready to work; they have been advertising for staff for the Commission, (and) those matters are well advanced,” Harmon stated.However, he was unable to provide a timeline for when the PPC can begin to carry out its mandate.“Once they say to us ‘we are ready to function’, then Cabinet will cease doing anything, but since these are public infrastructural projects that need to be executed, we cannot just sit and wait,” the Minister of State posited.“Once the PPC indicates that they are ready, then Cabinet will pull back,” he emphasised. Harmon also admitted that though the PPC has been inactive, the Commissioners have been receiving their salaries.“From the time they were appointed, they are entitled to those salaries,” he stated.Reports indicate that PPC Chairperson Carol Corbin is receiving $1.3 million monthly, while the other Commissioners are earning some $900,000 per month.The other Commissioners are Nanda Gopaul, Emily Dodson, Ivor English, and Sukrishnalall Pasha.According to the Procurement Act, the PPC is responsible for monitoring and reviewing the functions of all procurement systems, to ensure that they are in accordance with law and such policy guidelines, as may be determined by the National Assembly.It is also required to monitor the performance of procurement bodies, with respect to adherence to regulations and efficiency in procuring goods and services and execution of works, among other functions.last_img read more

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With Cap to Soar Trade Front Quiet

first_imgMIAMI  — In past years, a team like the Toronto Raptors almost certainly would have been looking to add some help for the stretch run. They’re holding down second place in the Eastern Conference, have been one of the league’s hottest teams for the last month and seem poised to make a significant playoff push.Yet on this trade-deadline day, they did nothing.They weren’t alone. For the most part, Thursday’s deadline came and went with most NBA teams seeming cautious, with the huge rise in the salary cap for next season — and the uncertainty of how the free-agent market will react to that over the summer — deterring clubs from making moves that might adversely affect their flexibility going forward.“Yes, we are in a different situation from last year,” Raptors general manager Masai Ujiri said.He was talking about his team. He may as well have been talking about the league, where there’s a clear wait-and-see approach about how the massive cap jumps that are coming will inevitably change the way teams go about their business. This season’s cap was a record $70 million. That seems like pocket change when compared to how next season will likely top $90 million, and a cap of $110 million or more for 2017-18 is possible.“The spike is something we’re all aware of … as we’re thinking about things and trying to create more financial opportunities in the coming summer, for us to grow and get better,” Atlanta coach Mike Budenholzer said. “I’m sure every team is similar.”There were several deals Thursday, but no blockbusters.Cleveland landed Channing Frye and the Los Angeles Clippers got Jeff Green for perhaps the two biggest player moves among contending teams, while Miami got under the luxury-tax threshold and Orlando opened up about $45 million in a pair of key accomplishments with an eye toward the future.Besides, with Golden State off to a 48-4 start, there probably aren’t that many teams thinking they have a legitimate chance of winning it all this year anyway.Hence, wait ’til next year — or at least ’til next summer — might have been the most prudent policy.“We’ve been on the other side of it not too long ago when you never knew if you were one piece away or one move away or how a trade could impact a season either positively or negatively,” Warriors guard and reigning MVP Stephen Curry said. “I like where we are.”Detroit was the most notable exception at trade time, with the Pistons adding Tobias Harris (his contract that runs through 2018-19), plus taking a chance on Donatas Motiejunas. He’ll be a restricted free agent, so Detroit will have a chance to keep him if it so chooses.“I don’t think anybody in the NBA knows exactly what the market is going to look like for guys this summer,” Pistons coach Stan Van Gundy told the team’s website. “You gauge it the best you can. … We weren’t going to give away assets for unrestricted free agents and so we feel good about it.”Most of the deals that were bandied about in recent weeks never happened.Dwight Howard, Al Horford and Kevin Love — all big names who got trade attention — stayed put.“Certainly the cap changes are going to make players under contract more valuable,” Cleveland general manager David Griffin said. “But I think in some cases people who had a big expiring contract weren’t getting the value they hoped to get because the guy was most likely going to walk.”That’s likely why Howard is still with Houston.It would have taken a strong combination of players and draft picks to get the Rockets to move him anyway, which some teams seemed willing to consider. But with Howard holding a $23 million player option for next season, he could — and by all indications, will — opt to become a free agent instead. So landing him would have come at a huge cost for some team who likely would have seen him leave July 1 anyway, and no deal got struck.“There’s no question that the new cap impacted not only the fundamentals of this trade period, but maybe even more the psychology of it as well,” Utah Jazz general manager Dennis Lindsey said.Minnesota GM Milt Newton understood why teams were hesitant.“Why bring someone into the fold that might take away some of your cap space when you’re not necessarily sold?” Newton said. “It may make your team better if you’re a playoff team for this year, but how will it affect you next year?”The NBA will know that answer in a few months.TIM REYNOLDS, AP Basketball Writer___AP Basketball Writer Jon Krawczynski in Minneapolis and AP Sports Writers Tom Withers in Cleveland, Kareem Copeland in Salt Lake City, Paul Newberry in Atlanta and Josh Dubow in Oakland, California contributed to this report.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more