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Lewis makes 2016 Contender debut tonight

first_imgRamel ‘Sub Zero’ Lewis, a former finalist in the ‘Wray & Nephew Contender’ series, will make his 2016 debut tonight against Fard ‘The Messenger’ Muhammad from Las Vegas, Nevada, in a five round fight.The fight will be broadcast live on Television Jamaica at 9.30 pm.Lewis, who has a record of six wins, which include three knockouts and three losses, has not fought since May 2014, when he lost to Tsetsi Davis in another Contender bout. He added a lot of weight during this time and had some difficulty coming down to the 147 welterweight limit.LOSING WEIGHTHis camp has stated that he has been working very hard over the past six weeks, that his weight is down to the welterweight limit, and that he is in good condition. He told The Gleaner recently that he is “feeling great, and looking forward to the first fight.”Lewis is known to be a hard-hitting fighter with power in both hands and is always a feared opponent. He is also quite vulnerable, however, as he leaves himself wide open at times.His opponent, Muhammad, is a late replacement and is a mixed martial arts (MMA) fighter, who is making his debut as a professional boxer. His record shows that he has a 3-3 MMA professional record and fought as recently as February 20 as a bantamweight. Fighting as a welterweight tonight, he should not have any problems making that weight and could well be giving away a lot of pounds against Lewis.It will be interesting to see how he adjusts to the cleaner style of professional boxing. In MMA, one can use hands and feet and wrestle an opponent to the canvas. Boxing skills are necessary, but are not the primary weapons in MMA. The rules of professional boxing are very different, and Muhammad will have to change his style a lot to cope with the new format.The boxers in the competition are vying for the Wray & Nephew Welterweight Contender 2016 title and prize money of $2 million for the champion, $500,000 for the runner-up, $250,000 for third place, and $200,000 for fourth place.last_img read more

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Pyeongchang Winter Olympics 2018: ‘the Games of new horizons’?

first_imgShare on Facebook Share on Messenger Winter Olympics 2018 Since you’re here… Skiing Share on Twitter Russia … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Facebook North Korea Share on WhatsApp Read more Hide Winter Olympics closing ceremony: 10 highlights from Pyeongchang Share via Email The North Korean cheerleading squad were another disarming highlight, although it was tempting to wonder what their lives are like now, away from gawping mouths and the lenses of the world’s media.Then there was Russia. On the final day of competition, the Olympic Athletes from Russia won their second gold of the Games, in the men’s ice hockey. But it only inched them up to 13th in the medal table – a far cry from their first place in Sochi when their athletes were fuelled by a cocktail of steroids as well as patriotic fervour.Their hockey players sung the national anthem in celebration – which broke the IOC’s set of “conduct guidelines” for the OAR team. Not that Bach or anyone else will care. And there is a pattern here. For according to the Washington Post, Russian spies were also guilty of a massive hack of computers at the opening ceremony, yet the IOC appear willing to give the country a pass over that too.Yet these Games were a success, which is something you couldn’t have been sure about barely a fortnight ago. Back then, all sorts of worries swirled around Pyeongchang – including the uncertainty over how North and South Korea would act, the forecast -20C temperatures, the worsening norovirus and the prospect of winds decimating the Alpine schedule. But, quickly and emphatically, the sport took over. news Snowboarding Winter Olympicscenter_img Twitter Show Thank you for your feedback. Share on LinkedIn Quick guide 10 key moments from the 2018 Winter Olympics Share on Pinterest South Korea Double gold medallist Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic: ‘the star of the Games’. Photograph: Christian Bruna/EPA 1. Ester Ledecka becomes snow queen2. North Korean cheerleaders3. South Korea’s Garlic Girls4. Gus Kenworthy’s kiss5. Return of the shirtless Tongan6. Chloe Kim launches out of a halfpipe into the hearts of the world7. Billy Morgan takes bronze in big air8. Lizzy Yarnold wins gold for Britain9. Diggins and Randall make history10. Canada’s sweethearts keep us guessing Was this helpful? It made Ledecka the first woman to win gold in different sports at a Winter Olympics in history – and a bona fide star.There was also a neat touch in the fact that Norway was able to top the medal table with 39 medals – and 14 golds – thanks to Marit Bjørgen’s gold medal on the 30km cross-country skiing in the final event of these Games. It meant the 37-year-old clinched a record eighth gold medal, and Norway had pipped Germany, who also had 14 golds.Britain finished 19th with one gold and four bronzes, which was broadly in line with expectations. The intriguing question is what happens next. After Sochi, UK Sport doubled its investment in winter sports to £28m and there was talk among some members of Team GB in Pyeongchang of wanting to be a top-five ski and snowboard country in the future – a move that would need more money.Some will regard that as rightly ambitious. Others, as folly. But certainly there were performances that captivated the nation, from Lizzy Yarnold becoming the first Briton to retain a Winter Olympics title to Elise Christie ripping the ligaments in her ankle and her hopes of a medal in the short track speed skating.Meanwhile seeing the likes of Billy Morgan, a 28-year-old former roofer who won a bronze medal in big air, and Molly Summerhayes, who works in McDonald’s in Sheffield and competed in the halfpipe, made it clear that winter sports are not just the preserve of the posh and the privileged.It helped, too, that there were a raft of medals for South Korean home favourites, including a silver for the popular “Garlic Girls” curling team on Sunday, while the thousands of helpful volunteers who cheerfully braved sub-zero temperatures ensured that these Games were a success. Pinterest Topics Support The Guardian Especially as, with his very next breath, he also promised that the Russian Olympic Committee’s suspension would be lifted very soon if there were no more positive tests. That suspension was imposed on 5 December and will have probably lasted less than 100 days when it is lifted. As a response to the most audacious state-sponsored doping programme in history, it counts as barely a slap on the wrist – even when a $15m fine, being forced to call themselves “Olympic Athletes from Russia”, and a ban on the Russian flag and anthem in Pyeongchang is tacked on.A closing ceremony that began with the crowd of 35,000 people counting down together to say “one” as the athletes entered the stadium ended with the Russians close to being officially readmitted to the Olympic fold. “Was it really right to draw a line through what had happened?” Bach was asked. “I don’t think, quite frankly, that the Olympics have been tainted by the Russian affair because we had no Russian team here,” he replied, brushing the issue that has bookended these Games aside.In the VIP seats for the closing ceremony were US president Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka, the South Korean president Moon Jae-in, and the vice-chairman of North Korea’s ruling Worker’s party central committee, Kim Yong-chol.Moon later told the cheering supporters: “The Games at Pyeongchang has come to an end, but the time of peace will continue … in Korea, we will continue our endeavour to broaden the horizon of peace that began in Pyeonchang.”The ceremony also featured traditional and modern Korean dance, a giant turtle, and a guitar solo of part of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons played by a 13-year-old.Yet there was also sadness as the Olympic flame was finally snuffed out after 16 days of competition across 102 events. Because when the politics stopped, the sport was frequently spectacular.The star of the Games was undoubtedly Ester Ledecka, the 22-year-old sporting polymath from the Czech Republic. It was audacious enough that she had entered ski and snowboard competitions. But then, incredibly, she won a shock gold in the Super-G ski before, six days later, storming home in the snowboard parallel giant slalom. Moments before the XXIII Winter Games ended amid a furious barrage of K-pop and firecrackers, the president of the International Olympic Committee, Thomas Bach, insisted: “We have seen here how sport can make the world a better place … these are the Games of new horizons.”Watching athletes from North and South Korea strolling happily together, for once separated by centimetres rather than 73 years’ antipathy, it was entirely possible to be swept along by waves of sentiment and hope.Yet another image of Bach, from earlier in the day, was also hard to shake: one of the IOC president despondently confirming that Russian athletes would not march under their own flag at Sunday’s closing ceremony, because of two doping violations at these Games. Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Rising prescription drug prices in focus at Rices Baker Institute June 8

first_imgFacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis ShareMEDIA ADVISORYDavid Ruthdavid@rice.edu713-348-6327Rising prescription drug prices in focus at Rice’s Baker Institute June 8 HOUSTON – (May 31, 2018) – Health economist Vivian Ho will speak at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy June 8 on the rise of prescription drug prices and describe policy options to control increases being recommended by policymakers, researchers and clinicians.The event is hosted by the Baker Institute’s Center for Health and Biosciences. The presentation is open to the public; the cost is $50 and must be paid upon registration.Who:               Vivian Ho, the James A. Baker III Institute Chair in Health Economics and director of the Center for Health and Biosciences, professor of economics at Rice and professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.What:             A presentation titled “Can Public Policy Control Rising Drug Prices?”When:            Friday, June 8, noon-1:30 p.m. Lunch will be served.Where:           Rice University, Baker Hall, Doré Commons, 6100 Main St.Prescription drug expenditures are projected to reach $360.2 billion this year. Per capita spending on these drugs rose 5 percent in 2015 and 3.5 percent in 2016. The public was outraged by stories of Martin Shkreli raising the price of Daraprim by 5,000 percent and Mylan raising the price of a pair of EpiPens by 400 percent, according to event organizers. Meanwhile, the cost of the most novel anticancer drugs has risen by 400 percent over the past 10 years, and the cost of new drugs that can cure hepatitis C is tens of thousands of dollars. Ho’s presentation will explore questions about whether the prices of prescription drugs will continue to rise at extraordinary rates, whether a handful of blockbuster drugs are to blame and whether all patients will be forced to pay rapidly rising prices.The public must RSVP for the event at www.bakerinstitute.org/events/1945. A live webcast will be available at the event webpage.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at jfalk@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.For a map of Rice University’s campus with parking information, go to www.rice.edu/maps. Media are advised to park in the Central Campus Garage.-30-Image for download:http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/05/Ho-event-1ylr9tk.jpgImage courtesy of Rice University/123rf.com.Follow the Baker Institute via Twitter @BakerInstitute.Follow the Center for Health and Biosciences via Twitter @BakerCHB.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Founded in 1993, Rice University’s Baker Institute ranks among the top three university-affiliated think tanks in the world. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows, Rice University faculty scholars and staff, coupled with its outreach to the Rice student body through fellow-taught classes — including a public policy course — and student leadership and internship programs. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog. last_img read more