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Op-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways

first_imgOp-Ed: How Is Trump Failing to Put America First? Let Us Count the Ways FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享San Diego Union Tribune:Now that President Donald Trump has enfeebled the Environmental Protection Agency, reversed climate regulations opposed by fossil fuel interests and announced U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord, it is right to examine whether his agenda on climate change really puts “America first,” which he so often proclaims is his overriding goal. In four critical areas, it does not.Our public health: The Trump agenda apparently disregards that the burning of fossil fuels spews volumes of gases and particulates into the air that are toxic to human health. Numerous studies show that the most severe effects include acute and chronic bronchitis, asthma attacks, lead and heavy metals poisoning, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, heart attacks and premature death, with those most vulnerable to these ills being the elderly and our children.Moreover, pollution from the burning of fossil fuels costs billions of dollars in health care costs that are “hidden” in that they are not reflected in the market price for these fuels. These “hidden” costs include lost work days, increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations, increased insurance premiums and the overall growth in our national health care costs. In a 2009 report requested by Congress, the National Academy of Sciences estimated that in 2005 alone these costs were more than $120 billion.Our economy: Although President Trump proclaims he will bring back jobs by cutting environmental regulations, the evidence shows that new clean-energy technologies and the industries formed around them create far more jobs than are lost in the transition from burning fossil fuels.According to a 2015 report by the Environmental Defense Fund, based upon Department of Energy data, clean energy jobs already outnumbered those in fossil fuel by more than 2.5 to 1 and were growing at a rate 12 times faster than the rest of the U.S. economy. In a 2017 report, the Department of Energy predicts that energy-efficient employment will grow at the rate of 9 percent in the next 12 months, faster than any other energy sector.Our national security: Trump’s agenda also ignores a stark warning from the Department of Defense contained in a 2015 report requested by Congress, “National Security Implications of Climate-Related Risks and a Changing Climate.”The report goes straight to the heart of the matter: “DoD recognizes the reality of climate change and the significant risk it poses to U.S. interests globally. The National Security Strategy, issued in February 2015, is clear that climate change is an urgent and growing threat to our national security, contributing to increased natural disasters, refugee flows, and conflicts over basic resources such as food and water. These impacts are already occurring, and the scope, scale, and intensity of these impacts are projected to increase over time.”Our global leadership: President Trump has announced that the U.S., the world’s largest polluter after China, will withdraw from the 2015 Paris climate accord, an international agreement, signed by the United States with 196 other countries, which commits the world community to a concerted effort in combating climate change. Our withdrawal would leave the U.S. isolated as one of a tiny handful of nations in the world that is not a member the pact.China, however, has signed the agreement and sees climate action as a way to fill the leadership vacuum left by the U.S., announcing plans to invest more than $360 billion in renewable energy by the end of this decade. Moreover, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, China is accelerating its foreign investments in renewable technologies and related equipment, a growing international market in which China may soon become the dominant player.Our announced withdrawal from the Paris agreement amounts to abdication of leadership in the global effort to combat climate change, at our cost and to China’s benefit.Let it therefore be said that President Trump’s agenda on climate change not only fails to put “America first” by ignoring the hard facts, it also puts in jeopardy our critical interests as a nation both at home and in the global arena.How Trump is failing to put America firstlast_img read more

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Indonesian urban consumers more optimistic than global peers: Survey

first_imgTopics : “Indonesian consumers are actually quite optimistic and intend to spend more in the future. And we can see that from a global perspective, that optimism is not shared,” PwC retail and consumer leader Peter Hohtoulas said during a webinar on Thursday. The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply affected Indonesian consumer’s purchasing power, as many have lost their jobs while businesses and factories ground to a halt. A significant decrease in consumer spending is evident by recently released data from Statistics Indonesia (BPS) that said household spending contracted by 5.51 percent year-on-year (yoy) in the second quarter of this year. The Indonesian government has rolled out programs to cushion the economic impact of the pandemic. Among others, it is subsidizing electricity fees to accelerate recovery in business operations and household spending. Indonesian consumers’ optimism is particularly unique as more consumers in Indonesia have been financially affected by the pandemic in comparison to global consumers.  According to the PwC survey, 65 percent of the Indonesian respondents said they had experienced a decrease in household income, meanwhile, only 45 percent of the global consumers reported likewise. The decrease in income is also accompanied by an increase in household bills, including expenses for food and electricity. Around 63 percent of Indonesian consumers say they have experienced an increase in household bills, while that figure is 41 percent for global consumers. Peter explained that the optimism was mainly driven by the country’s younger cohort, including millennials. Being a country with a relatively young population, the future of consumer spending looked good from an Indonesian perspective, Peter said. “Consumers will come back to the market and we have seen this in other markets as they have opened up,” Peter noted, adding that despite the positive signals, businesses would still need to plan with cautions as a rebound might be short-lived due to new outbreaks.center_img Indonesian urban consumers are more optimistic than their global peers despite more consumers being impacted financially as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, a survey has shown. According to the recently launched Global Consumer Insights Survey 2020 by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), 64 percent of Indonesian consumers say that they are going to spend more over the next few months, compared to 33 percent seen in the global survey results.Respondents in Europe, for example, are fairly more pessimistic, with 71 percent saying they will either spend around the same or less in the upcoming months. Meanwhile, the same survey said 19 percent of Indonesians would spend around the same and 17 percent of respondents said they would spend less.  last_img read more

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No bail bond for rape suspect

first_imgOfficers of the Talisay City policestation served the warrant issued by Judge Eduardo De Los Santos of theRegional Trial Court Branch 46 in Bacolod City dated April. 17, 1995. Gilbert Begueras had been hiding fromthe police for about 25 years. BACOLOD City – No bail bond wasrecommended for the temporary liberty of a rape suspect in Barangay DosHermanas, Talisay City, Negros Occidental. His apprehension was staged on thestrength of an arrest warrant around 7 a.m. on Jan.18, police said. Begueras was detained in the custodialfacilty of the Talisay City police station./PNlast_img read more

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Solvay, Marcellus goes to 2-0; Ludden stuns Westhill

first_img Tags: Bishop LuddenfootballSolvayWesthill More than ever, the Solvay football team has a reason to think that a decade mostly spent in despair is about to end, replaced by the sort of gridiron glory the Bearcats once claimed on a regular basis.Taking a long road trip north to South Jefferson on Friday night, Solvay broke out with its high-flying attack in the second quarter and continued to pull away until it had defeated the Spartans 40-14.The Bearcats share first place in Class B West with Marcellus, who again had no trouble on its home field, cruising to a 39-13 victory over the Cortland Purple Tigers.As that went on, Bishop Ludden, beaten by South Jefferson in its Sept. 6 opener, turned it around against its next-door neighbors from Westhill with timely big plays that led to a 26-6 victory over the Warriors.Solvay’s hot start, combined with a favorable early schedule, could mean that the Bearcats secure a long-elusive Section III playoff berth by October.A scoreless first quarter at South Jefferson caused some brief concern, but that faded away when Brock Bagozzi, from the Spartans’ 41, went deep and found a wide-open Blaine Franklin for the go-ahead touchdown two minutes into the second period.Less than three minutes later, it was 12-0, the Bearcats driving to the Spartans’ one before Bagozzi scored on a sneak. And with 38 seconds left in the half, Bagozzi drilled a 10-yard TD pass to Franklin.South Jefferson did grab a quick TD of its own seconds later and cut Solvay’s lead to 18-8 at the break, but instead of rattling the Bearcats, it only made them more determined to put the game away.Tyriq Block scored from 25 yards out on Solvay’s first possession of the second half. Late in the third quarter, another Bearcats drive started and Elijah Wright capped it off with a three-yard TD plunge.Block capped it off with a 35-yard dash to the end zone with 8:04 to play as he gained 90 yards on nine carries, with Jaimen Bliss running 16 times for 105 yards.Bagozzi completed 13 of 24 passes for 144 yards, most of his passes going to Franklin or Brendon Carolina, who had nine completions for 78 yards.It turned out just as lopsided with Marcellus against Cortland, though in this case it was the Mustangs relying on an unstoppable ground game to wear the Purple Tigers down.Nick Kermes led the way, gaining 201 yards on 20 carries and scoring three touchdowns. Sean Tierney added 115 yards on 14 carries and Wilvon McKee scored twice while gaining 85 yards on nine carries.Meanwhile, Westhill, fresh off its Sept. 6 season-opening win over Homer, expected to roll again when it faced Bishop Ludden, but instead found itself unable to score early, stopped inside the Gaelic Knights’ 10-yard line during the opening period.The Gaelic Knights took control with two plays. Early in the second quarter, pinned at his own three-yard line, Ludden quarterback Nazier Kinsey found a seam in Westhill’s defense and outran everyone on a 97-yard dash to the other end zone.Still reeling from this, Westhill saw Kinsey strike again when, from his own 25, he threw deep and found Antwon McMullen, the 75-yard touchdown extending the Gaelic Knights’ edge to 13-0 by halftime.Even when Garvin Kinney’s 13-yard scoring pass to Jose Gonzalez got the Warriors on the board in the third quarter, Ludden absorbed it and put together two clutch drives, Kinsey finishing each of them with TD runs of 13 and three yards. In defeat, Westhill’s Riley McNitt ran for 108 yards on 23 carries, but never broke the big run his team needed. Kinney completed 11 of 22 passes for just 67 yards, running for 67 yards on eight carries.Now Westhill would go to Cortland this Friday, just as Ludden would try and challenge Solvay on the Gaelic Knights’ home field and Marcellus would make a crucial trip to Homer.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story last_img read more