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Prices of Commodities Skyrocket in Greenville

first_imgAs the roads of Liberia’s Southeast’s continue to worsen, prices of essential commodities have sky rocketed beyond the reach of ordinary citizens and residents of Greenville City in Sinoe County.In addition, several feeder roads leading to the various districts are inaccessible due to the fact that most of the farm-to-market roads have not been rehabilitated nor are there any plans in the offing to fix them.   Sadly, prices of most essential commodities have soared so much that the lives of ordinary citizens and residents in the port city of Greenville could be described as grave and worrisome.Amongst many of the essential commodities whose prices have hit the roof are sardines, plastic dishes, rice, palm (imported), drinks and locally produced foodstuffs.Consequently, according to businessmen and women operating stores and shops in Greenville City, prices of essential commodities have dramatically escalated owing to hike in transportation fares from Monrovia and other parts of the country.Transportation fares from the commercial district of Red-light Market in Paynesville to Greenville City in Sinoe County have been stepped up LD$8,000.00 for a to and fro trip.Previously, a round trip from Monrovia to Greenville was LD$6000.00 per commuter with the exception one’s personal effects.Businesswomen and men taking goods, services and things told the Daily Observer last week in Greenville City that due to the hike in transport fares, their entities are not doing well economically in Sinoe County.The nation’s staple food rice a 25-pounds of bag is now been sold for LD$1,700.00, bottle of stout LD$175.00, canned of sardine LDS115.00, bottle of large beer LD$210.00, finger size batteries LD$40.00 and all frozen food commodities have climbed the hiking ladder at the port city of Greenville in Sinoe County.In separate interviews with both residents and businesspeople last week, they expressed grave concern over the escalating price increases in Greenville City and other parts of that county.Businessman Francis Tugbeh Doe said that until urgent steps are taken to rehabilitate the most life threatening deplorable spots on the Sinoe-River Cess highways, the situation will continue to deteriorate rapidly on commodities’ prices in Greenville City.“I think the Liberian Government needs to re-examine, evaluate and monitor the construction works being carried out on the between River Cess and Sinoe Counties in terms of durability and sustainability,” Mr. Doe stressed.Businessman George Browne Nimely told the Daily Observer that the Rainy Season by all engineering standards is not best time to work on unpaved roads in the country.“We want to reduce the prices of essential commodities but, the transportation fares are retarding the undertaken of such a realistic venture in Greenville City,” businessman Nimely asserted.For her part, businesswoman Betty Sumo Wesseh stressed the need for the complete reconstruction of the Sinoe-River Cess in order to save the citizens and residents of Greenville City.Madam Wesseh added that they were really catching hard times on the highways of Sinoe and River Cess counties owing to the deplorable conditions of dangerous spots and life threatening potholes.“I want the Liberian Government to bring pressure to bear on the road construction company that currently responsible for the rehabilitation of the River Cess-Sinoe Highway in Greenville and other areas in Sinoe County, Madam Wesseh concluded.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Martian encounter

first_imgLA CA ADA FLINTRIDGE – For the past seven months, NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been tearing toward the outer solar system at a blistering 6,000 mph. But by mid-afternoon today, if all goes as planned, it will be looping around Mars, on its way to becoming the Red Planet’s newest observer. At 1:24 p.m. PST, as scientists and engineers pace nervously at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory here and at Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver, the orbiter should fire thrusters that slow it enough to be captured by Mars’ gravity. It’s a challenge that Jim Graf, the project manager at JPL, likened to exiting the Pasadena (110) Freeway – slowing from the high speeds of the left lanes to the crawl required to navigate the exit. As with the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, he said, “If you don’t make the offramp, then you’re doomed.” Nevertheless, despite many sleepless nights leading up to today, “I’m anxiously optimistic,” he said. The orbiter, which will study the planet’s atmosphere, surface and underground features, has been performing well thus far, JPL scientists said. “We’ve sent many commands to the spacecraft to date, and it’s always done everything we’ve asked it to,” said Peter Xaypraseuth. But Mars is an unforgiving destination, where only one-third of past missions have arrived successfully. Even if all goes as scheduled today, the peril isn’t over for the $720 million probe. In two weeks, after a weekend of rest for the mission crews followed by days of renewed testing, engineers will send the orbiter into more than 500 smaller ovals around the planet. In a process called aerobraking, the orbiter will slow and spiral inward until it is low enough for the science missions to begin. If the craft survives, dodging dust storms and billowing waves of hot air that could knock it off course, researchers can finally start collecting data from the craft’s six instruments. Among those instruments is High-RISE, a high-resolution camera capable of photographing coffee table-size surface features, said JPL deputy project scientist Sue Smrekar. “Every time we look at the planet at higher resolution, we get a very different picture of what’s happening on the planet, of the geology on the surface,” Smrekar said. “We’re anticipating we’ll see a lot of different processes we’ve never seen before.” One of the mission’s objectives is to search for landing sites for future spacecraft. Another top priority is the search for water, which is generally considered a necessity for life. An onboard radar will look for thick layers of ice beneath the surface and pockets of liquid water under Mars’ frozen poles. Other instruments will study the composition of the atmosphere and the minerals on the planet’s surface. If successful, the orbiter will return more data than all previous Mars missions combined, Graf said. But, said JPL’s Mars program manager Fuk Li, “there is this matter of turning \ from a cruiser to Mars to a true orbiter of Mars.” And if something goes wrong, Graf said, “there is no time for the team as a whole to react. The spacecraft has to do it all on its own.” JPL flight engineer elise.kleeman@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4451 AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more