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Vermont Yankee expected back on line soon

first_imgAs of today, Vermont Yankee reports that the refueling and maintenance outage is in Day 24 and work activities continue to noticeably wind down. Work at the cooling towers involving the third (and final) phase of the cooling tower upgrades continue, and the safety-related section of the west tower is complete. Also complete is the replacement of service water piping to “A” Emergency Diesel Generator and the routine cleaning of the intake bays.VY completed leak testing of tubes in the main condenser through the use of specialized “dimple” plugs, designed to identify even the smallest of leaks.  The source of power for the outage was transferred to the main transformer.  This allowed the next phase of work on the new Vernon Substation to commence.Preparations for start up continue on the refuel floor. The reactor pressure vessel has been reassembled and is being pressure tested today. In conjunction with this test, control rods will be tested. Tomorrow, the Integrated Leak Rate Test of the primary containment will be started. The test involves pressurizing the primary containment and then measuring the leakage rate or pressure drop over a several hour period.The test of the Emergency Core Cooling System was successfully conducted on Sunday, and all of the Emergency Core Cooling Systems responded as expected, but an unanticipated action occurred during the test. The initiating conditions for the test set the water level higher than normal in the reactor vessel. When the test began and steam valves automatically realigned, some of the excess water (above the steam lines) drained through a steam line to the torus which contains a back up supply of cooling water and is located in the reactor building. According to VY, there were no safety consequences and the incident was not immediately reportable. Still, plant management has taken steps to ensure this is not repeated in future tests. VY has also shared the issue with other nuclear plants. The steam lines will be drained and verified free of moisture.Work on the soil remediation from the tritium leak continued through the outage and is on schedule to be completed in the coming weeks. The rerouting of steam trap piping from the Advanced Off Gas system is complete and the reachable areas of the AOG pipe tunnel have been cleaned.The final stage of the outage will be switching and valve alignment of plant systems from their maintenance mode to their normal operations mode, and conducting final tests in preparation for start up. Once the plant is phased back on the grid, it will take several days to achieve full power. The outage is not considered over until the plant reaches 100 percent power. The staff will continue to test and monitor plant systems during the power ascension.Source: Vermont Yankee. May 18, 2010last_img read more

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Trail Mix – Andrew Alli

first_imgI first learned of Andrew Alli’s music late last summer.Andrew and his musical compadre, Josh Small, were a part of a contingent of musicians from Virginia who traveled to the United Kingdom to perform at the Long Road Music Festival. I was blown away at first listen and began scheming as to when and how I could see him live.Last month, I was lucky enough to host Andrew and Josh for a listening room show here in Wise.It was an incredible evening of music.The energy in the music that this duo is able to create with just a harmonica and acoustic guitar is palpable. Alli’s blues harp combines effortlessly with Small’s jazz-inflected guitar playing. The crowd gathered here was wowed for sure.Andrew Alli and Josh Small recently released a self-titled EP featuring six tracks that prove the spirit of the blues lives and breathes still.I recently caught up with Andrew to chat about the blues, playing the harmonica, and his day job in trail maintenance at James River Park in Richmond, Virginia.BRO – What got you into playing the blues?AA – Well, I technically found the harmonica before I got into the blues. Ten years ago, when I was in college, I was inspired by a guy who was playing harp on the street. That day I went to the store and bought a cheap harp and instantly fell in love with it. Shortly after that, I discovered all of the legendary blues harp players and the rest is history.BRO – Who is on your Mt. Rushmore of harp players?AA – That’s easy. Big Walter Horton, Little Walter, Sonny Boy Williamson II, and George Harmonica Smith.BRO – Best part about playing music with Josh Small?AA – Josh and I have been playing together so long that we anticipate where the other is going. He’s also just a real down to Earth and easy going friend with great musical taste.BRO – We are featuring “My Stomp” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?AA – I wrote this song a while ago when I was a bit younger and playing out with other bands. I would often be questioned about my place in the blues community being so young. I feel that the blues is nothing but a feeling and experience. “My Stomp” tells a bit of my story and relationship with what we call the blues.BRO – Plan a great day in James River Park for me.AA – I would start the morning with a nice mountain bike ride on the North Bank and Buttermilk Loop Trail. After that, it’s down the river for a canoe trip to Williams Island to pick freshly ripened paw paws. Finally, we would hit the Texas Beach rocks for some swimming and a beverage and watch the sunset.You can catch Andrew Alli and Josh Small live at Hardywood Craft Brewery in Richmond later this month and in early February.For more information on Andrew Alli, when you can catch him live with Josh Small, and how you can get a copy of the new EP, check out his website.And be sure to take a listen to “My Stomp,” along with brand new tracks from Pierce Pettis, Melody Guy, and Amelia White on this month’s Trail Mix.last_img read more