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FairPoint to expand broadband coverage to East Dover

first_imgConsolidated Communications,FairPoint Communications, a leading telecommunications provider in northern New England, is working with the town of Dover to bring high-speed Internet access to more than 200 homes and businesses in East Dover for the first time. FairPoint will be in East Dover at the Town Hall on Wednesday, December 7, from 6 to 8:30 pm, to answer questions and start signing up people for high-speed access.Dover town officials turned to FairPoint to expand its VantagePoint services in East Dover where residents do not have high-speed Internet access. VantagePoint services are provided over FairPoint’s IP-based network, the largest network of its kind in northern New England. ‘We understand the critical need for high-speed broadband services for both business and residential needs,’ said Ken Black, economic development specialist with the town of Dover. ‘In an effort to expand this to a group of rural, non-serviced users, the town of Dover approved funds to engage FairPoint to build and supply this capability.’Refreshments will be served and there will be prizes and giveaways for all who join in this high-speed, high-fun event. Interested residents can also find out more about FairPoint’s products and promotions prior to December 7 by calling 877.491.6706, or by requesting a call from a customer service representative through the Contact Us form at www.FairPoint.com/contactus(link is external). The expansion project consists of three zones. FairPoint is finishing work in Zone 1, which includes approximately 120 locations along these streets: Elva’s Way; 77-133 Goose City Road; 141-169 Holland Road; 7-16 Jenne Road; Jockey Hollow; 5-87 Locust; 6-295 North Street; 21-60 Robbins Way; 1-5 Rocky Lane; 6-52 Sherman Road; 11-34 Turner Road; 2-58 Wakelee Road and 15-95 Whites Hill Road. The Dover Select Board approved $59,000 to cover Zone 2, which includes approximately 110 locations along these streets: 6-14 Beech Tree Lane; 1-109 Captain Copeland Road; 5-117 Cooper Hill Road; 178-261A Dover Hill Road; 235 Dover Road; 1-51 Harris Road; 8-100 Higley; 22-109 Holland Road; 5 Morse Road; Rice Hill; 13-14 Robbins Road; 20 Robins Road; 138-193 Taft Brook Road and 6 Timberview Road. Pending town approval, a third project is being considered for 2012 to bring high-speed service to Zone 3, covering approximately 175 locations along these streets: 1-40 Brickyard Road; 90-129 Captain Copeland Road; 15-80 Carroll; 35-160 Dover Hill Road; 23-64 Goose City Road; 52 Harris Road; 12-26 Mandy’s Road; 2-79 North Street; 20-36 O’Neil Road; 8-101 Snow Road; 4-111 Taft Brook Road; 5-11 Thomas Lane and 15-179 Yeaw Road. FairPoint, which completed Vermont’s largest broadband expansion project to date, now provides access to nearly 90 percent of its Vermont customers. ‘This is an exciting opportunity for FairPoint,’ said Mike Smith, Vermont state president. ‘When it comes to getting high-speed access to more Vermonters, FairPoint has led the way. We thank the town of Dover for their confidence in us.’ About FairPoint Communications, Inc.FairPoint Communications, Inc. (NasdaqCM: FRP) is a leading communications provider of high-speed Internet access, local and long-distance phone, television and other broadband services to customers in communities across 18 states. Through its fast, reliable network, FairPoint delivers affordable data and voice networking communications solutions to residential, business and wholesale customers. FairPoint delivers VantagePointSM services through its resilient IP-based network in northern New England. This state-of-the-art network provides Ethernet connections that support video conferencing, e-learning and other broadband based applications. Additional information about FairPoint products and services is available at www.FairPoint.com(link is external). You can also connect with FairPoint on Twitter (http://www.twitter.com/myfairpoint(link is external)) and Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/myfairpoint(link is external)).SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (Nov. 29, 2011) ‘ FairPoint Communications ###last_img read more

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Syracuse Chiefs look to improve on league-worst 2014 attendance numbers

first_img Published on April 13, 2015 at 11:20 pm Contact Justin: jmatting@syr.edu | @jmattingly306 Dave Smolnycki does it for the game of baseball. When he takes his seat in Section 204, Row 8 on Thursday he’ll be in attendance for the 45th-consecutive Syracuse Chiefs home opener.“I know nowadays, you need all the fancy stuff with the entertainment, but to me, it’s always been the game itself,” he said.But the number of fans like Smolnycki is steadily decreasing.Minor league baseball teams are having to rely on entertainment and promotions to bring fans out to the ballpark. As the Chiefs are set to have their home opener at NBT Bank Stadium on Thursday, the club will look to rebound from a season in which it placed last in the International League in attendance. But now second-year general manager Jason Smorol is confident that there’s a turnaround coming up.Smorol came to the Chiefs — the Triple-A affiliate of the Washington Nationals — with more than a decade’s worth of minor league baseball experience. When he took over in October 2013, Smorol had the mentality of being all about the fans and being “more minor league-y.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I just came in with my philosophy,” Smorol said. “I don’t know that that’s any different than someone else’s philosophy, it’s just what I was taught to do in baseball and that is to be about the fans.”Despite extensive efforts to try and bring fans to the 11,117-seat ballpark, the Chiefs finished last in both total and average attendance in the International League in 2014. The paid total of 247,046 was the lowest in the history of the Chiefs’ ballpark, which opened in 1997 and is now called NBT Bank Stadium after two name changes.Smorol said that while the club announced a more than 100,000-person decrease in attendance from 2013, concession sales were up and there were actually more people physically in the ballpark than in previous years—during which attendance tracking wasn’t as accurately portrayed, said Benjamin Hill, who covers minor league baseball for MiLB.com.Smorol took over as general manager following 44 years of either Tex or John Simone running the ball club and said the Chiefs are still essentially starting a brand-new franchise from scratch. It was often the case where fans could go to a local grocery store or bank and get free Chiefs tickets. Smorol said no more — there were no free tickets last year, except for the city of Syracuse buying out the July 4 game.“Our product has value,” he said. “So we established that value of $12, $10, $5 a ticket and then more people came last year.”To generate that value and build some buzz, the Chiefs held promotions such as Deport Justin Bieber Night, Boy Band Night and Tattoo Night to go along with the classics of Fireworks Night and Giveaway Saturdays.Promotions are more important in minor league baseball than in the major sports because in minor league baseball the average fan is not a fan of the team, Hill said.The most effective promotions, Hill said, are ones that don’t have to be explained, such as fireworks. The Chiefs currently have 20 fireworks shows planned for this year, compared to 13 last year.“Owning a ball club is like owning a restaurant with live entertainment,” said Lloyd Johnson, editor of the Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball.The club is continuing to try and improve attendance through promotions, adjusting to what’s popular — such as selling beer for $2 on Thursdays.Promotions aren’t the only factor that goes into attendance, but also the weather. During 2014 Chiefs home games, about 2,300 fewer fans on average came to the ballpark when there was precipitation.In 2010, Stephen Strasburg made four starts for the Chiefs at then-named Alliance Bank Stadium. Strasburg was the consensus No. 1 prospect in baseball and a former No. 1 overall draft pick. Smolnycki described the ballpark as “jam-packed” and “bedlam.”“It just was a whole different atmosphere,” he said. “People were into the game.”In Strasburg’s four starts in Syracuse, the Chiefs averaged 5,678 more people per game than their average attendance for 2010.But having Strasburg, and eventually top prospect Bryce Harper in 2011, come to Syracuse was “lightning in a bottle.”“There’s just really not enough baseball fandom intensity in the minors for top prospects to get that kind of attention, unless they’re true outliers like Strasburg or Harper,” Hill said.Right-handed pitcher A.J. Cole is the Chiefs’ highest-rated prospect to start the season, coming in at No. 30 on the Baseball Prospectus Top 101 Prospects list. He’s the only current Chief on the list.Even without a top prospect, sometimes a winning team isn’t enough automatically help boost attendance.The Chiefs won the International League North Division last year by two and a half games, but still finished last in attendance for the entire league. In 47 of their 66 home games, they had the higher winning percentage of the two teams going in.Marshall Adesman, a former general manager for the Waterloo Indians, said winning is the best promotion, but is not necessary to have good attendance. The Chiefs largest total attendance for a season, 1999, came in a year when the team finished two games above .500.There are many factors that go into attendance, both for the Chiefs and minor league baseball as a whole. What Smorol and other managers can do is “control the controllables.”While Chiefs management can’t control the weather, the on-field performance or the roster, they can control the fan experience.“We want to really engage our fans and we want them to have fun,” Smorol said. “Again, that’s what it’s all about — just the fans having fun, wanting to come to the ballpark, spend some time with their families, spend some time with their friends and by the way, there’s a really good baseball game going on.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Fred VanVleet injury update: Raptors guard to have thumb surgery, report says

first_imgFred VanVleet is expected to miss more time than originally thought.The Raptors guard is set to have surgery to repair ligament damage in his left thumb, according to The Athletic, and he is expected to miss five weeks.  Toronto Raptors guard Fred VanVleet will undergo surgery for ligament damage in his left thumb and miss approximately five weeks, league sources tell @TheAthleticNBA @Stadium.— Shams Charania (@ShamsCharania) February 13, 2019The team initially expected the 24-year-old to miss three weeks after suffering the injury in the second quarter of Saturday’s win against the Knicks, however, it appears his time away from the court will be at least two weeks longer. VanVleet, in his third season with the Raptors, is averaging 10.5 points and 4.6 assists in 26.8 minutes per game this season. He had been holding down a key role in Toronto’s rotation as the team continues to manage Kyle Lowry’s recurring back issues.  Related News NBA free agency rumors: Lakers, Rockets, Raptors interested in forward Markieff Morrislast_img read more

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Atoning

first_imgYes, I admit I am a weakling. Ask my good friends and family and they will attest to my lack of physical strength. I’ve made a second career of avoiding exercise, albeit a poor one. It’s a job without payoff or benefits and while I might have been working hard at avoiding hard workouts, my body has paid the price. I was tone deaf.But not any longer. A few weeks ago I began my latest mission — strength training and cardio workouts with my personal trainer Jenny Costello. Everyone should have someone like Jenny. She cares about my nutrition and how I feel overall, she motivates and inspires me. I was at a point in my life where it no longer made sense to avoid a structured exercise routine. Hiring Jenny made complete sense. It was an investment in me — in my well being.Jenny and I were a natural pairing from the start. And knowing how I love a good story, Jenny had one. A resourceful person, she made a career change from finance to fitness so that she could be closer to home to care for her young children. She turned her passion into a business. I love that kind of story.My recent dedication to fitness has helped in all areas of my life. I’m enjoying more of what I took for granted for many years: preserving the precious gift of living well. We all deserve this.Here’s to progress.For more information about Jenny Costello’s personal training sessions and boot camps, call (732) 778-2385.Please e-mail me at emccarthy@tworivertimes.com.last_img read more

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Two Education Officials Join Brookdale Board

first_imgLINCROFT – Henry Cram, Ed.D. of Long Branch and Paul Crupi of Ocean were sworn in as the newest members of the Brookdale Community College board of trustees during the board’s Nov. 20 annual meeting.Cram, a former teacher, college instructor and school superintendent, is current president of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools’ (MSA) Commissions on Elementary and Secondary Schools.In his nine-year career with the MSA, Cram has visited and worked with schools in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Central and South America and the Caribbean.He formerly served as director of professional development for the New Jersey Association of School Administrators and is a past recipient of the Education Best Practices Award from the state Department of Education.Cram holds a doctorate in educational administration from Rutgers University, a professional diploma in educational administration from Fordham University and master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Montclair State College and William Patterson College, respectively.Crupi currently serves as legislative liaison for the state education department. He has previously worked as special assistant to the department’s chief of staff and as a policy advisor in the Office of the Governor.A lifelong Monmouth County resident, Crupi holds a master’s degree in public policy from the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University.Cram and Crupi replace outgoing trustees Lucille Jones and Brian Butch, both of whom had served on the board since 2005.last_img read more