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FCC raises 2 billion in second 5G spectrum auction

first_img Sarah Tew/CNET Angela Lang/CNET $90 at Daily Steals via Google Express 5G AT&T FCC Verizon,I’m shocked — shocked! — to learn that stores are turning Labor Day into an excuse to sell stuff. Wait — no, I’m not. As much as I respect the original intent of the holiday (which became official back in 1894), to most of us, it’s just a bonus day off — one that’s blissfully tacked onto a weekend. So, yeah, stores; go ahead, run your sales. I’m listening. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Labor Day doesn’t bring out bargains to compete with the likes of Black Friday (which will be here before you know it), but there are definitely some sales worth your time.For example:We’ve rounded up the best Labor Day mattress deals.We’ve also gathered the best Labor Day laptop deals at Best Buy.The 2019 Vizio P Series Quantum is back under $999.Be sure to check out Amazon’s roughly three dozen Labor Day deals on TVs and audio. Google Express is having a big sale as well, one that includes deals on game consoles, AirPods, iPhones, laptops and more.Below I’ve rounded up a handful of individual items I consider to be the cream of the crop, followed by a handy reference guide to other Labor Day sales. Keep in mind, of course, that products may sell out at any time, even if the sale itself is still running. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Other Labor Day sales you should check out Best Buy: In addition to some pretty solid MacBook deals that have been running for about a week already, Best Buy is offering up to 40% off major appliances like washers, dryers and stoves. There are also gift cards available with the purchase of select appliances. See it at Best BuyDell: Through Aug. 28, Dell is offering an extra 12% off various laptops, desktops and electronics. And check back starting Aug. 29 for a big batch of Labor Day doorbusters. See it at DellGlassesUSA: Aug. 29 – Sept. 3 only, you can save 65% on all frames with promo code labor65. See it at GlassesUSALenovo: The tech company is offering a large assortment of deals and doorbusters through Labor Day, with the promise of up to 56% off certain items — including, at this writing, the IdeaPad 730S laptop for $700 (save $300).See it at LenovoLensabl: Want to keep the frames you already love and paid for? Lensabl lets you mail them in for new lenses, based on your prescription. From now through Sept. 2 only, you can save 20% on the blue light-blocking lens option with promo code BLOCKBLUE. See it at LensablSears: Between now and Sept. 7, you can save up to 40% on appliances (plus an additional 10% if you shop online), up to 60% on mattresses, up to 50% on Craftsman products and more. The store is also offering some fairly hefty cashback bonuses. See it at SearsNote: This post was published previously and is continuously updated with new information.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page, and find more great buys on the CNET Deals page. See at Amazon See It Read the Rylo camera preview Comments Though not technically a Labor Day sale, it’s happening during Labor Day sale season — and it’s too good not to share. Nationwide Distributors, via Google Express, has just about the best AirPods deal we’ve seen (when you apply promo code ZBEDWZ at checkout). This is for the second-gen AirPods with the wireless charging case. Can’t imagine these will last long at this price, so if you’re interested, act fast. DJI’s answer to GoPro’s action cameras is rugged little model that’s shockproof, dustproof and waterproof down to 11 meters. It normally runs $350, but this deal drops it to $261 when you apply promo code 19LABOR10 at checkout. $999 Verizon speeds on 5G. Jessica Dolcourt/CNET The Federal Communications Commission’s second 5G spectrum auction has ended, raising $2 billion in gross bids.5G, already launched in the US by Verizon and AT&T, is the next-generation network being used by smartphones to provide faster speeds and more capacity.Through its second auction, the FCC sold off a batch of millimeter-wave (mmWave) high-bandwidth spectrum in the 24GHz band, with 2,904 of the 2,909 licenses offered being awarded on Tuesday. The licenses mean carriers can launch mobile services across multiple frequencies, improving latency, speeds and capacity.”American leadership in 5G means deploying more airwaves for the next generation of wireless connectivity,” FCC Chair Ajit Pai said in a statement. “By making more spectrum available, we’ll ensure that American consumers reap the substantial benefits that 5G innovation will bring and we’ll extend US leadership in 5G.”In total, the second auction raised $2,024,268,941. The FCC has yet to reveal who won what.The first 5G spectrum auction ending in Jan. saw the FCC raise $702,572,410 in gross bids, awarding 2,965 of the 3,072 licenses offered in the 28GHz mmWave band after opening up bidding in November.The third 5G spectrum auction will kick off on Dec. 10, with licenses in the 37GHz, 39GHz and 47GHz bands up for sale. I thought this might be a mistake, but, no, the weirdly named HP Laptop 15t Value is indeed quite the value at this price. Specs include an Intel Core i7 processor, 12GB of RAM, a 256GB solid-state drive and a 15.6-inch display. However, I strongly recommend paying an extra $50 to upgrade that display to FHD (1,920×1,080), because you’re not likely to be happy with the native 1,366×768 resolution. Read Google Home Hub review Post a comment $299 at Amazon DJI Osmo Action camera: $261 (save $89) Chris Monroe/CNET Use promo code 19LABOR10 to get an unusually good deal on JBL’s interesting hybrid product — not quite headphones, and not quite a traditional speaker, but something you wear like neckphones to listen to music on the go. $520 at HP The problem with most entry-level laptops: They come with mechanical hard drives. That makes for a mighty slow Windows experience. This Lenovo model features a 128GB solid-state drive, so it should be pretty quick to boot and load software, even with its basic processor. Plus, it has a DVD-burner! That’s not something you see in many modern laptops, especially at this price. Sarah Tew/CNET Free Echo Dot with an Insignia or Toshiba TV (save $50) The Cheapskate HP Laptop 15t Value: $520 (save $780) Apple iPhone XS $60 at Best Buy Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Rylo $59 at eBay JBL Soundgear wearable speaker: $90 (save $160) Share your voice Mobile Tech Industry Internet Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Read Lenovo Smart Clock review An Echo Dot makes a fine match for any Fire edition TV, because you can use the latter to say things like, “Alexa, turn on the TV.” Right now, the 24-inch Insignia Fire TV Edition starts at just $100, while the 32-inch Toshiba Fire TV Editions is on sale for $130. Just add any Fire TV Edition to your cart, then add a third-gen Echo Dot, and presto: The latter is free. Sarah Tew/CNET See it Read the AirPods reviewcenter_img Tags Rylo 5.8K 360 Video Camera: $250 (save $250) Amazon Read DJI Osmo Action preview Turo is kind of like Uber meets Airbnb: You borrow someone’s car, but you do all the driving. I’ve used it many times and found it a great alternative to traditional car-rental services — in part because you get to choose exactly the vehicle you want (not just, say, “midsize”) and in part because you can often do pickup and dropoff right outside baggage claim.Between now and Sept. 1, the first 300 people to check out can get $30 off any Turo rental with promo code LDW30. Formerly known as the Google Home Hub, Google’s Nest Hub packs a wealth of Google Assistant goodness into a 7-inch screen. At $59, this is within a buck of the best price we’ve seen. It lists for $129 and sells elsewhere in the $89-to-$99 range.This is one item of many available as part of eBay’s Labor Day Sale (which, at this writing, doesn’t specifically mention Labor Day, but that’s how it was pitched to us). Turo Google Nest Hub: $59 (save $70) What’s cooler: A snapshot of a firework exploding in front of you, or full 360-degree video of all the fireworks and all the reactions to seeing them? Oooh, ahhh, indeed. At $250, the compact Rylo dual-lens camera is selling for its lowest price yet. And for an extra $50, you can get the bundle that includes the waterproof housing.This deal runs through Sept. 3; it usually costs $500. Turo: Save $30 on any car rental $210 at Best Buy $155 at Google Express See at Turo Best Buy Lenovo Smart Clock: $59.99 (save $20) Lenovo 130-15AST 15.6-inch laptop: $210 (save $90) Spotify and most other streaming services rely on compressed audio, which robs the listener of full fidelity. Enter Tidal, the only “major” service that delivers lossless audio — meaning at least on par with CD quality, if not better. Want to see (er, hear) the difference for yourself? Grab this excellent extended trial while you can. It’s just $6 for three months, and it’s good for up to six listeners. 7 Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) See It $999 0 Recently updated to include digital-photo-frame capabilities, the Lenovo Smart Clock brings Google Assistant goodness to your nightstand. It’s a little smaller than the Amazon Echo Show 5, but also a full $30 less (and tied with Prime Day pricing) during this Best Buy Labor Day sale. Boost Mobile Tidal 3-month family subscription: $5.99 (save $54) See It CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Share your voice Sarah Tew/CNET Apple AirPods with Wireless Charging Case: $155 (save $45) Sprint $999 $6 at Tidal Tags $999 TVs Speakers Mobile Accessories Cameras Laptops Automobiles Smart Speakers & Displays $261 at Daily Steals via Google Expresslast_img read more

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Life through her lenses

first_imgOne winter morning in 2013, when filmmaker Chitvan Gill, witnessed a grim patch of land turning overnight into a Kashmiri shantytown, she assumed the migration resulted from yet another turbulence in the valley.“I used to go to this area in East Delhi very often and suddenly out of the blue one morning, I come across a camp, just overnight. With the ongoing unrest in Kashmir in 2013, I thought it had got something to do with that. They must have fled their homes,” said Gill. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’But, as she delved deeper into their homes, stories unfurled breaking stereotypes associated with the lives of those hailing from Jammu and Kashmir.Gill has captured their stories and way of life that has endured unnoticed in hidden corners of the national capital, in her two-day photo exhibition, Winterlude: A season in Delhi held at Alliance Francaise de Delhi.“When I started enquiring, I realised there’s nothing to do with any trouble, there’s nothing to do with any terrorism,” she says. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“This was a journey that thousands of impoverished peasants and farmers of Kashmir have been making to Delhi for more than four decades. Each year, as a mantle of snow descends over the idyllic Kashmir Valley, they flee here, to this flattened remain of a landfill, to escape the bitter chill,” says the photographer.The exhibition, which is a visual inquiry, into the lives of the unlikely nomads, captured and communicated their varied moods through a collection of 65 photographs. Almost like an oxymoron, gleaming faces of children with cracked cheeks, running noses and greased limbs, running amidst squalor, were recurrent in Gill’s exhibition.“The children were what was most remarkable about the camp. You forgot the filth and acid smoke and were drawn into their sheer joy, their laughter. Oblivious to the ugliness and degradation, it is a carnival, a time of unbridled exuberance and play for them,” said Gill. Gill says she has captured them in some of the most ordinary postures, but the freshness in expression, makes the pictures stand out.Other pictures document several aspects of their daily lives, from setting up their hutments, to their means of survival.“Stakes are driven into the ground, bamboo poles and splints form flimsy scaffoldings, blanketed over by bright sheets of tarpaulin,” she added.Hailing from an agricultural background, most of them, she says, “live off their earnings from their seven months in the valley, while a few engage in the uncanny business of ‘chanda’ collection.” The exhibition was an outcome of Gill’s photographing in East Delhi over a span of two winters, of 2013 and 2014.“Both the years, they came much later due to floods and elections,” she said.“While they were very happy being photographed, there was an evident ‘worriness’ about coming out into the open, for the obvious reason of being associated with violence,” she says vindicating why she has deliberately refrained from mentioning the exact location of the settlement.last_img read more

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Buy Leaseor Move to Cloud Computing

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Your trusty old office computers are likely chugging along with the power of a 20-year-old Oldsmobile climbing Mt. Everest, gamely working hard to complete ever more complicated and varied tasks for your company’s employees. But while it might be time to replace the outdated PCs, with today’s credit crunch, you may be considering alternatives to simply buying new hardware as a way to save your business money.So should you lease new hardware, forgoing boxed software? Or try the new cloud computing solutions that are being touted as the next big thing? We’ll look into a variety of options for your business and let you know which ones will save you money, and which could potentially cost you big.Leasing vs. Buying: Good Deal or Bad Idea? According to a 2007 study by IDC, cutting your PC’s life cycle to three years, versus five or six years, will save you on the overall cost of maintaining that system. As presented in the study, keeping two generations of leased desktop PCs (held for three years each) is 20.5 percent less expensive than buying and holding one machine for six years.Lifecycle implications aside, there are other considerations to mull over before signing a hardware lease, such as end-of-lease costs and other fees that can accrue if not monitored, according to Joe Loiselle, Vice President of Global IT Advisory Services at IDC.”Leasing is not a bad thing, if you manage it. Unmanaged, it will be a big liability. Most [leases] favor the lack of discipline a buyer has, and most favor a mobile device–it moves, breaks, and changes hands,” he says. Unless you are going to send back the equipment on time and address end-of-lease issues, Loiselle believes that your organization is going to bleed cash. Most people don’t pay attention to a lease once they sign it, he adds, and lease agreements aren’t exactly designed to save you money in the long run.”Companies are making a mass exodus from leasing,” says Loiselle. Leasing “is a Venus flytrap: it’s tough to get into and tougher to get out of.” Of course, given today’s credit crunch, it will be more difficult to get a lease or financing in the first place.When it comes to servers, it can be even more difficult to return equipment, as data, applications, and network connections are all affected when you remove a server. Servers are not as easy thing to rip out of your network, and most small businesses don’t have redundancies in place, according to Loiselle.A final consideration before signing a lease: Businesses are often able to write off as much as $15,000 for new equipment, so it may make sense to buy the equipment outright. Be sure to check with your accountant or tax preparer before making a move to either option.Cost Comparisons: Is Leasing Cost Effective?We looked at lease deals on three computer manufacturers’ sites, comparing pricing options for ten laptops. Overall, we found that leasing is the costlier option in the long run, even if it’s cheaper at the outset.At HP’s site, we selected the option to purchase ten business notebooks at a cost of $15,590. HP lists the lease price for these same notebooks as $413 per month for a 48-month lease. That’s $19,824 for a 48-month lease, or an additional $4824 to lease the machines, rather than buy them outright. (To find out about other lease lengths, pricing, or options, check HP’s site.)On Dell’s site, the company lists finance options that include both fixed purchase options (FPO) and full market value (FMV) options for leasing with 24-, 30-, 36-, or 48-month financing. Both options require a $75 processing fee. Our total for ten similarly equipped laptops, sans shipping and tax, was $15,695.Displayed right beside the total on Dell’s site are links to the lease options. (Before you go through the process of getting qualified, you can estimate your payments based on your credit level–Excellent, Good, or Fair–and the total purchase amount.) The 48-month lease on $15,695 was $460.96 per month for FMV and $461.04 for $1 Buy-Out. That’s $22,126.08 for FMV and $22,129.92 for $1 Buy Out over 48 months. You do the math: Purchasing equipment outright saves you at least $6500 here.Next, we clicked over to Fujitsu’s site, where the company offers lease purchase options of $1, 10 percent, or FMV, and provides a lease calculator to figure out your costs. Fujitsu doesn’t offer a 48-month lease, but its 36-month lease on ten laptops totaling $15,000 was $473 on the FMV plan, $483 on 10 Percent Purchase, and $522 on $1 Buyout. So that was $17,028, $17,388, or $18,792, respectively on a $15,000 equipment purchase.In the end, the ten laptops we researched on the three vendor sites on average cost $4000 more if you were to lease them for 48 months, as opposed to buying them outright. While leasing does mean you won’t be strapped with a steep initial cost, buying saves a bunch of cash in the long run.Buying also potentially saves more money down the line, as lease contracts can stipulate that a vendor can charge extra should you return your equipment late or without a clean hard drive.Printer Leasing and Online Faxing: Panacea or Problematic?If your office needs also include high-volume printing, collating, and all the bells and whistles of a big-budget printer, many companies offer equipment leases. HP and Xerox both offer lease options for high-end, high-volume models.For example, the high-volume black-and-white HP LaserJet M5000 MFP series starts at $4000 retail, and the Color LaserJet CM6030 MFP series starts at $7000. But to lease, you’ll have to pay $115 per month for the M5000, or $190 per month for the CM6030 for a 48-month lease. (That means you’ll spend $5520 for the M5000, or $9120 for the CM6030, over the course of 48 months.)Though high-volume printers don’t have quite as short a lifecycle as a notebook or desktop, it pays to do your research to understand the lease options, what’s expected at the end of the lease, and what your total cost will be over the life of the lease.For expensive office equipment, such as a high-volume printer, you may find that the extra money spent over the course of a lease makes sense, as it’s only one device that will remain in your office, and it’s easier to track than a laptop. As with any lease, make sure you understand the terms and whether you’ll be stuck shipping a giant printer back to the vendor once the lease is up.Your needs may include less printing and more faxing, however. These days, a new fax machine ranges in price from less than $100 to $350, depending on feature set. But if you don’t send faxes often enough to justify a machine or a separate phone line, many free and low-cost online services let you send faxes online. These “virtual fax machine” services let you send faxes via e-mail and receive them; some offer a free local landline number.Do a Google search for “online fax” and you’ll find that there are literally thousands of Internet faxing services available, with a range of prices and features. Some are free, some let you send faxes only, and others let you both send and receive–all without a physical fax machine.One popular service, Myfax, offers plans that start at $10 per month or $110 a year to send 100 pages and receive 200 per month. The service also includes one year of online storage and either a local or a toll-free fax number.Efax is another Internet fax provider. It offers free, Plus, and Pro plans. The paid plans run around $20 per month, and you can receive faxes free. You can send 30 pages per month, and additional pages run 10 cents each. To read or create faxes, you’ll need the service’s free eMessenger application. The site does not offer storage, and larger faxes may take up a large chunk of your inbox.Overall, online faxes are a great deal if you don’t want to pay a monthly fee for a phone line, buy the equipment, or lack a permanent office space. Online faxes can also be more secure than a fax that sits out in a public area. But if you want the dependability of a landline and a permanent fax number, online faxes may not be the best option.Reach for the Clouds: Storage, Servers, and Services You may decide to simply forgo new equipment and software in favor of cloud computing, which has been gaining in popularity and hype in recent months. Companies like Google, Dell, HP, Oracle, Amazon, Salesforce.com, and even Microsoft are providing applications, Web space, and computing power via the Web. But does this mean that your traditional software applications and servers will be unnecessary?Gartner believes that 80 percent of Fortune 1000 companies will be using some form of cloud computing services by 2012. Cloud computing lets large companies spend more money on infrastructure and less money on the actual hardware, but as cloud computing gains in popularity, some industry experts argue that costs will increase as adoption takes hold.”Windows isn’t going away, but more and more services will be offered from the cloud, rather than installed and managed on specific on-premises platforms,” says Thomas Bittman, a Gartner analyst, on his blog. “Not to say that Amazon, Salesforce or Google have all the kinks worked out–but they sure have lowered the barrier to entry for a developer looking to build a global-class application on the cheap.”You don’t need to buy hardware or software, but you will often have to pay for space and the use of cloud computing applications. (You may need a consultant to set up some of these, however.)Some examples of cloud computing offerings include Salesforce.com, a customizable online customer-relationship management database service that offers tools to track contacts and sales leads, run campaigns, generate reports, and track revenue. You can also store files online. Its AppExchange lets you browse and install applications from partners and third-party developers. The company offers a 30-day trial, and pricing varies depending on your needs and the number of users. Check the Salesforce site for specific pricing.Amazon’s recently launched EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud) service lets you forgo buying Web servers and rent instead. The term “elastic” means you can rent what you need on demand and pay for the bandwidth and server processes you use. Storage via Amazon’s S3 (Simple Storage Service) lets you store and retrieve any amount of data, starting at 15 cents per gigabyte per month. Amazon’s EC2 pricing model is based on a number of factors, including data transfer–but there is no minimum fee or activation.And Microsoft is getting into the act with its Windows Azure, a cloud-computing platform that allows developers to build and host their services on Microsoft infrastructure. Azure is not available yet, but it will reportedly eliminate the need to update your desktop applications.Of course, when it comes to cloud computing, Google Docs has been the long-standing application king. Google offers free word processing, calendaring, e-mail, spreadsheets, and collaboration tools as well as paid services that include e-mail archiving, the ability to disable ads, and support. On its site, Google lists side-by-side benefits of both free and paid plans.Though every cloud has a silver lining, these cloud services aren’t all dreamy. For one, you are at the mercy of the provider, and if they suffer an outage, so do you. Google’s recent Gmail outage left customers stranded without e-mail and their online applications for days. Security is also up to the provider, so make sure to check out whether its security level meets your needs.Whether you go the traditional route of buying your software in a box, renting server space online, buying hardware outright, or leasing, it pays to do your research, and to understand the risks. And remember, if something sounds too good to be true, it almost always is. 11 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » Brought to you by PCWorld November 20, 2008last_img read more