0

New York NY – Whether embarking on an adventurous

first_imgNew York, NY – Whether embarking on an adventurous safari or attending a quick business meeting, a trip to the Mideast or Africa is always exhilarating. Elite Traveler, the private jet lifestyle magazine, has released its selections of the top suites at the top luxury hotels in the Mideast and Africa at www.elitetraveler.com. The comprehensive editorial guide to the top suites of top hotels and resorts is designed for elite travelers and the magazine’s typical reader who flies by private jet.“The readers of Elite Traveler make 41 trips per year, including 11 intercontinental trips,” noted Douglas Gollan, President and Editor-in-Chief of Elite Traveler. “These accomodations are hidden wonders that encompass the private, yet exotic nature of an excursion to the Mideast or Africa.”The luxury hotels and resorts featured in the Elite Traveler guide to Top Hotel Suites of The Mideast & Africa are:-Banyan Tree Desert Spa and Resort, Al Areen, Bahrain -Shangri-La’s Barr Al Jissah Resort & Spa -Burj Al Arab -Kwandwe Private Game Reserve -Twelve Apostles Hotel And Spa -Grande Provence Wine Estate -The Melrose Arch Hotel -Banyan Tree Seychelles -Bateleur Camp at Kichwa TemboFor each hotel or resort, the guide provides beautiful pictures of the top suites and insider information on special services, plus direct contact information to the hotel or resort.“Elite Traveler readers spend over $350,000 on stays and events at luxury hotels and resorts, so this is a great way to provide our readers updated and relevant content on the top suites at the top hotels and resorts at the tip of their fingers,” said Gollan.The Mideast and Africa luxury guide can be found at www.elitetraveler.com plus additional guides on luxury hotel and resort suites to more than 40 cities, including Monaco, London, Los Angeles, New York and Dubai.last_img read more

0

Bostons subway cars hold fewer harmful microbes than our guts

first_imgIf you’re a fan of public transportation, you probably expect subway cars to be crawling with bacteria—after all, thousands of people ride them daily. But a new analysis of Boston’s subway system says that may not be the case: The seats, hanging straps, and even the ticket machines in the transit system contained no higher levels of dangerous microbes than most people encounter in daily life. In the first survey of mass transit microbes to look at a variety of surfaces and materials, scientists took 100 samples from three separate rail lines, six different types of train surfaces, and the ticketing machines in stations. After sequencing the swabs, researchers found fewer microbes associated with antibiotic resistance than are found in a normal person’s intestines, they report today in mSystems. Overall, only 46 antibiotic-resistant genes were found in the Boston subway system, far fewer than the roughly 1000 antibiotic-resistant genes found in the human gut. The most common microbe found was Propionibacterium acnes, the common and harmless skin bacterium known for causing acne. Human gut, oral, and even vaginal microbes were found in smaller quantities throughout the system. The most bacteria-laden surface was the subway’s hanging grips, followed by seats and ticket machine touch screens. Researchers concluded that outside of flu or other outbreaks, the disease risks from riding the subway are fairly low. They aren’t saying how their findings will apply to other mass transit systems, but they do hope they can be used to better design public spaces to contain outbreaks. In the meantime, though, there’s no need to wear gloves while commuting.last_img read more